History Main / ComputerEqualsMonitor

12th May '16 8:49:53 AM AceOfScarabs
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** The IPC [=MyGenie=], a consumer desktop that was on the market in the late 1990s, was a whole desktop with several other kinds of multimedia hardware, including a FM TV-and-Radio tuner; the whole PC fitted into a tall monitor setup.
7th Apr '16 5:52:04 AM Aetol
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** [[InvertedTrope Inverted]] in [[https://notalwaysright.com/all-in-wonder/2547 this entry]]: when confronted with an all-in-one [=iMac=], the caller assumed the actual computer was missing.



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8th Feb '16 5:17:42 PM DanMat6288
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* The supercomputer in ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'', while known to fall under half the tropes in the entire MagicComputer database, very notably averts this trope. The parts of the computer most often seen are the three-screen monitor and holographic map in the center of the top floor of the lab, and then there's the three scanners in the room below. The actual supercomputer ''itself'', however, is a giant cylindrical machine another floor below, which wasn't seen until near the end of the first season. Doing any damage to the equipment above won't damage Lyoko, since the actual hard drives are on the bottom floor.

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* The supercomputer in ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'', while known to fall under half the tropes in the entire MagicComputer MagicalComputer database, very notably averts this trope. The parts of the computer most often seen are the three-screen monitor and holographic map in the center of the top floor of the lab, and then there's the three scanners in the room below. The actual supercomputer ''itself'', however, is a giant cylindrical machine another floor below, which wasn't seen until near the end of the first season. Doing any damage to the equipment above won't damage Lyoko, since the actual hard drives are on the bottom floor.
8th Feb '16 5:15:12 PM DanMat6288
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Added DiffLines:

* The supercomputer in ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'', while known to fall under half the tropes in the entire MagicComputer database, very notably averts this trope. The parts of the computer most often seen are the three-screen monitor and holographic map in the center of the top floor of the lab, and then there's the three scanners in the room below. The actual supercomputer ''itself'', however, is a giant cylindrical machine another floor below, which wasn't seen until near the end of the first season. Doing any damage to the equipment above won't damage Lyoko, since the actual hard drives are on the bottom floor.
15th Jan '16 6:27:53 AM Anddrix
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* Justified in an episode of ''Series/{{NCIS}}'', when computer-averse Gibbs tries to fix the e-mail client on his computer by ''[[Funny/{{NCIS}} whacking the monitor with a baseball bat he apparently kept under the desk for just this purpose]]''. Gibbs is the type to believe this, and his attempt doesn't accomplish anything. However, played straight later in the same episode when Gibbs is faced with a mainframe that needs to be shut down, which he does by shooting it up; the bullet that apparently serves as the killshot goes through (one of!) the monitors. (If you're feeling generous, you could say that it was an all-in-one system that was part of a CnC cluster, and they just used the term "mainframe" because it would [[ViewersAreMorons make more sense to the audience.]] If you're feeling generous.[[note]]On the other hand, it's very likely the NCIS writers are intentionally trolling their techie fans on a regular basis anyway...[[/note]])

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* Justified in an episode of ''Series/{{NCIS}}'', when computer-averse Gibbs tries to fix the e-mail client on his computer by ''[[Funny/{{NCIS}} whacking the monitor with a baseball bat he apparently kept under the desk for just this purpose]]''. Gibbs is the type to believe this, and his attempt doesn't accomplish anything. However, played straight later in the same episode when Gibbs is faced with a mainframe that needs to be shut down, which he does by shooting it up; the bullet that apparently serves as the killshot goes through (one of!) the monitors. (If you're feeling generous, you could say that it was an all-in-one system that was part of a CnC cluster, and they just used the term "mainframe" because it would [[ViewersAreMorons make more sense to the audience.]] audience. If you're feeling generous.[[note]]On the other hand, it's very likely the NCIS writers are intentionally trolling their techie fans on a regular basis anyway...[[/note]])
24th Nov '15 8:29:11 PM jormis29
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** Averted in ''Chaos Theory'', where in order to remote-hack any computer, Sam must locate the actual hard drive instead of the usually more visible monitors. Averted even further in that computers with the monitors turned off or even destroyed can still be remotely hacked.
** Also in the first game: when bad guys are removing all the evidence from the computers, one of the {{mooks}} shoots the monitor and is convinced that the job is done. Another one scolds him, telling him that he needs to wipe the hard drive, collect the USB sticks, and ''then'' shoot the mainframe.

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** Averted in ''Chaos Theory'', where in order to remote-hack any computer, Sam must locate the actual hard drive instead of the usually more visible monitors. Averted even further in that computers with the monitors turned off or even destroyed can still be remotely hacked.
** Also in
In the first game: when bad guys are removing all the evidence from the computers, one of the {{mooks}} shoots the monitor and is convinced that the job is done. Another one scolds him, telling him that he needs to wipe the hard drive, collect the USB sticks, and ''then'' shoot the mainframe.mainframe.
** Averted in ''[[VideoGame/SplinterCellChaosTheory Chaos Theory]]'', where in order to remote-hack any computer, Sam must locate the actual hard drive instead of the usually more visible monitors. Averted even further in that computers with the monitors turned off or even destroyed can still be remotely hacked.
17th Sep '15 12:36:26 AM Tuckerscreator
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* {{Subverted|Trope}} [[PlayedForLaughs in humorous fashion]] in ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier''. Steve decides he's heard enough of [[spoiler:[[BrainUploading brain-uploaded]] Arnim Zola's]] EvilPlan and smashes his computer monitor. [[spoiler:Dr. Zola]] simply switches to a second monitor and continues the interrupted spiel.

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* {{Subverted|Trope}} [[PlayedForLaughs in humorous fashion]] in ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier''. Steve decides he's heard enough of [[spoiler:[[BrainUploading brain-uploaded]] Arnim Zola's]] EvilPlan and [[ShutUpHannibal smashes his computer monitor.primary screen]]. [[spoiler:Dr. Zola]] simply switches to a second monitor and continues the interrupted spiel.
21st Aug '15 12:45:25 PM Kadorhal
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** Averted in ''Chaos Theory'', where in order to remote-hack any computer, Sam must locate the actual hard drive instead of the usually more visible monitors. Averted even further in that computers with destroyed monitors can still be remotely hacked.

to:

** Averted in ''Chaos Theory'', where in order to remote-hack any computer, Sam must locate the actual hard drive instead of the usually more visible monitors. Averted even further in that computers with the monitors turned off or even destroyed monitors can still be remotely hacked.
5th Aug '15 6:14:38 PM evdebs
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* Justified in an episode of ''Series/{{NCIS}}'', when computer-averse Gibbs tries to fix the e-mail client on his computer by ''[[Funny/{{NCIS}} whacking the monitor with a baseball bat he apparently kept under the desk for just this purpose]]''. Gibbs is the type to believe this, and his attempt doesn't accomplish anything. However, played straight later in the same episode when Gibbs is faced with a mainframe that needs to be shut down, which he does by shooting it up; the bullet that apparently serves as the killshot goes through (one of!) the monitors. (If you're feeling generous, you could say that it was an all-in-one system that was part of a CnC cluster, and they just used the term "mainframe" because it would [[ViewersAreMorons make more sense to the audience.]] If you're feeling generous.)

to:

* Justified in an episode of ''Series/{{NCIS}}'', when computer-averse Gibbs tries to fix the e-mail client on his computer by ''[[Funny/{{NCIS}} whacking the monitor with a baseball bat he apparently kept under the desk for just this purpose]]''. Gibbs is the type to believe this, and his attempt doesn't accomplish anything. However, played straight later in the same episode when Gibbs is faced with a mainframe that needs to be shut down, which he does by shooting it up; the bullet that apparently serves as the killshot goes through (one of!) the monitors. (If you're feeling generous, you could say that it was an all-in-one system that was part of a CnC cluster, and they just used the term "mainframe" because it would [[ViewersAreMorons make more sense to the audience.]] If you're feeling generous.)[[note]]On the other hand, it's very likely the NCIS writers are intentionally trolling their techie fans on a regular basis anyway...[[/note]])
19th Jul '15 6:13:14 AM jormis29
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* In the game ''VideoGame/{{Hitman}} 2: Silent Assassin'', in a mission in Kuala Lumpur, you have to shoot a screen in order to complete one of the mission's objectives. {{Justified|Trope}} [[VoodooShark somewhat]] as there is no CPU visible.

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* In the game ''VideoGame/{{Hitman}} 2: Silent Assassin'', ''VideoGame/Hitman2SilentAssassin'', in a mission in Kuala Lumpur, you have to shoot a screen in order to complete one of the mission's objectives. {{Justified|Trope}} [[VoodooShark somewhat]] as there is no CPU visible.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ComputerEqualsMonitor