History Main / CollegeIsHighSchoolPart2

23rd Sep '16 12:07:50 PM cdrood
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* Averted in one episode of ''Series/{{FamilyTies}}''. Alex is given an F on a college term paper because the professor felt he was just regurgitating the arguments of well know historical figures instead of coming up with an argument of his own and backing it up with facts.
** On the other hand, Alex is of the opinion that Grant College, where his sister Mallory attends, is High School Part 2.
27th Jul '16 8:01:20 PM Discar
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->'''Title Card''':''This is an Iowa State College production.''
->'''Tom Servo''': "Iowa State College, the high school ''after'' high school."

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->'''Title Card''':''This Card''': ''This is an Iowa State College production.''
->'''Tom
''\\
'''Tom
Servo''': "Iowa Iowa State College, the high school ''after'' high school."
10th May '16 8:32:10 PM Thespian101
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* YYMV, but this trope can be TruthInTelevision, depending on the individual. In particular, some small liberal arts colleges/universities in the US have been referred to by students as "high school all over again." It depends on the person and the college, but this trope does happen in real life.
17th Apr '16 5:46:52 PM DavidDelony
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Many television and movie writers, however, seem unusually clueless about how different college life really is from high school life. Thus, they'll apply many popular high school tropes to university settings. Sometimes this makes sense, and a few, such as the SadistTeacher, are if anything ''more'' plausible in a college setting. Far more often, however, the opposite is true, because they're either unrealistically below the maturity level of your typical college student, or simply not feasible within the general structure of university life. For example, a team of thuggish [[JerkJock football players]] [[BarbaricBully perpetually bullying a shy/awkward freshman]] is ''highly'' unlikely in a university setting since they will not live in the same building, attend the same classes, or have remotely the same schedule. Just as unlikely is a close-knit group of students having the exact same class schedule each semester.

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Many television and movie writers, however, seem unusually clueless about how different college life really is from high school life.life despite the fact that most of them are college-educated themselves. Thus, they'll apply many popular high school tropes to university settings. Sometimes this makes sense, and a few, such as the SadistTeacher, are if anything ''more'' plausible in a college setting. Far more often, however, the opposite is true, because they're either unrealistically below the maturity level of your typical college student, or simply not feasible within the general structure of university life. For example, a team of thuggish [[JerkJock football players]] [[BarbaricBully perpetually bullying a shy/awkward freshman]] is ''highly'' unlikely in a university setting since they will not live in the same building, attend the same classes, or have remotely the same schedule. Just as unlikely is a close-knit group of students having the exact same class schedule each semester.
16th Mar '16 1:13:46 PM MsChibi
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The transition from high school to college is typically one of the biggest transitions you'll make in your entire life [[note]] although arguably not as momentous as transitioning from elementary school to high, if only because [[NothingIsTheSameAnymore the change seems a lot scarier]] when you're four years younger [[/note]]. Abruptly gone are things like principal's offices, standardized school scheduling, and forced/required teacher compassion. Similarly, "popular crowds" are mostly relegated to certain dormitories. And bullying becomes PassiveAggressiveKombat if anything. In college, no matter how athletic or smart you are, you're basically a nobody in the midst of a large and culturally-diverse student body. And, unlike in high school, your instructors and parents will not determine your general course of action. Your life plan is now completely up to you. On the plus side, it is easy to make friends by finding groups that match your interests, and thus lifelong outcasts can finally have a place where they belong.

to:

The transition from high school to college is typically one of the biggest transitions you'll make in your entire life [[note]] although arguably not as momentous as transitioning from elementary school to high, if only because [[NothingIsTheSameAnymore the change seems a lot scarier]] when you're four years younger [[/note]]. Abruptly gone are things like principal's offices, standardized school scheduling, and forced/required teacher compassion. Similarly, "popular crowds" are mostly relegated to certain dormitories. And bullying becomes PassiveAggressiveKombat if anything. In college, no matter how athletic or smart you are, you're basically a nobody in the midst of a large and culturally-diverse student body. And, unlike in high school, your instructors and parents will not determine your general course of action. Your life plan is now completely up to you. On the plus side, it is easy to make friends by finding groups that match your interests, although cliques ''typically'' are much more flexible (if not entirely nonexistent) and people don't ''entirely'' define themselves by music or fashion, and thus lifelong outcasts can finally have a place where they belong.
20th Feb '16 8:58:24 PM 10-13-2
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One could argue that the reason why this trope exists is because most college-themed works are aimed at a high school audience (or, perhaps, because [[TheCoconutEffect college students are imagined to]] ''[[TheCoconutEffect look]]'' [[TheCoconutEffect like high-school students]] thanks to DawsonCasting). And, since most people would be uncomfortable watching "naive" high school students (for example) engaging in raunchy/anti-social behavior, writers instead use a college setting, while implementing enough high school tropes that their works will still be relatable to the average high schooler. In other instances, it's simply a matter of [[CriticalResearchFailure not doing the research]]. Sometimes, however, this trope will be justified by depicting the work's respective university as a sub-par school where all the burnouts and slackers go. Some countries, particularly any that have ever been communist, actually do have universities that are like super high schools in that they lack freedom and choice.

to:

One could argue that the reason why this trope exists is because most college-themed works are aimed at a high school audience (or, perhaps, because [[TheCoconutEffect college students are imagined to]] ''[[TheCoconutEffect look]]'' [[TheCoconutEffect like high-school students]] thanks to DawsonCasting). And, since most people would be uncomfortable watching "naive" high school students (for example) engaging in raunchy/anti-social behavior, writers instead use a college setting, while implementing enough high school tropes that their works will still be relatable to the average high schooler. In other instances, it's simply a matter of [[CriticalResearchFailure not doing the research]]. Sometimes, however, this trope will be justified by depicting the work's respective university as a sub-par school where all the burnouts and slackers go. Some countries, particularly any that have ever been communist, actually do have universities that are like super high schools in that they lack freedom and choice.
choice; also, the students themselves will probably be a lot more innocent due to their education ''in general'' having been throttled (think of Cultural Revolution-era China, where ''no one'' was educated for several years until the schools were finally reopened) and thus will probably have the social skills of teenagers or even younger children.
20th Feb '16 8:53:36 PM 10-13-2
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One could argue that the reason why this trope exists is because most college-themed works are aimed at a high school audience. And, since most people would be uncomfortable watching "naive" high school students (for example) engaging in raunchy/anti-social behavior, writers instead use a college setting, while implementing enough high school tropes that their works will still be relatable to the average high schooler. In other instances, it's simply a matter of [[CriticalResearchFailure not doing the research]]. Sometimes, however, this trope will be justified by depicting the work's respective university as a sub-par school where all the burnouts and slackers go. Some countries, particularly any that have ever been communist, actually do have universities that are like super high schools in that they lack freedom and choice.

to:

One could argue that the reason why this trope exists is because most college-themed works are aimed at a high school audience.audience (or, perhaps, because [[TheCoconutEffect college students are imagined to]] ''[[TheCoconutEffect look]]'' [[TheCoconutEffect like high-school students]] thanks to DawsonCasting). And, since most people would be uncomfortable watching "naive" high school students (for example) engaging in raunchy/anti-social behavior, writers instead use a college setting, while implementing enough high school tropes that their works will still be relatable to the average high schooler. In other instances, it's simply a matter of [[CriticalResearchFailure not doing the research]]. Sometimes, however, this trope will be justified by depicting the work's respective university as a sub-par school where all the burnouts and slackers go. Some countries, particularly any that have ever been communist, actually do have universities that are like super high schools in that they lack freedom and choice.
20th Feb '16 8:50:59 PM 10-13-2
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The transition from high school to college is typically one of the biggest transitions you'll make in your entire life. Abruptly gone are things like principal's offices, standardized school scheduling, and forced/required teacher compassion. Similarly, "popular crowds" are mostly relegated to certain dormitories. And bullying becomes PassiveAggressiveKombat if anything. In college, no matter how athletic or smart you are, you're basically a nobody in the midst of a large and culturally-diverse student body. And, unlike in high school, your instructors and parents will not determine your general course of action. Your life plan is now completely up to you. On the plus side, it is easy to make friends by finding groups that match your interests, and thus lifelong outcasts can finally have a place where they belong.

to:

The transition from high school to college is typically one of the biggest transitions you'll make in your entire life.life [[note]] although arguably not as momentous as transitioning from elementary school to high, if only because [[NothingIsTheSameAnymore the change seems a lot scarier]] when you're four years younger [[/note]]. Abruptly gone are things like principal's offices, standardized school scheduling, and forced/required teacher compassion. Similarly, "popular crowds" are mostly relegated to certain dormitories. And bullying becomes PassiveAggressiveKombat if anything. In college, no matter how athletic or smart you are, you're basically a nobody in the midst of a large and culturally-diverse student body. And, unlike in high school, your instructors and parents will not determine your general course of action. Your life plan is now completely up to you. On the plus side, it is easy to make friends by finding groups that match your interests, and thus lifelong outcasts can finally have a place where they belong.
2nd Feb '16 6:46:22 PM fenyx4
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The transition from high school to college is typically one of the biggest transitions you'll make in your entire life. Abruptly gone are things like principal's offices, standardized school scheduling and forced/required teacher compassion. Similarly, "popular crowds" are mostly relegated to certain dormitories. And bullying becomes PassiveAggressiveKombat if anything. In college, no matter how athletic or smart you are, you're basically a nobody in the midst of a large and culturally-diverse student body. And, unlike in high school, your instructors and parents will not determine your general course of action. Your life plan is now completely up to you. On the plus side, it is easy to make friends by finding groups that match your interests, and thus lifelong outcasts can finally have a place where they belong.

Many television and movie writers, however, seem unusually clueless about how different college life really is from high school life. Thus, they'll apply many popular high school tropes to university settings. Sometimes this makes sense, and a few, such as the SadistTeacher, are if anything ''more'' plausible in a college setting. Far more often, however, the opposite is true, because they're either unrealistically below the maturity level of your typical college student, or simply not feasible within the general structure of university life. For example, a team of thuggish [[JerkJock football players]] [[BarbaricBully perpetually bullying a shy/awkward freshman]] is ''highly'' unlikely in a university setting since they will not live in the same building, attend the same classes or have remotely the same schedule. Just as unlikely is a close-knit group of students having the exact same class schedule each semester.

One could argue that the reason why this trope exists is because most college-themed works are aimed at a high school audience. And, since most people would be uncomfortable watching "naive" high school students (for example) engaging in raunchy/anti-social behavior, writers instead use a college setting, while implementing enough high school tropes that their works will still be relatable to the average high schooler. In other instances, it's simply a matter of [[CriticalResearchFailure not doing the research]]. Sometimes, however, this trope will be justified by depicting the work's respective university as a subpar school where all the burnouts and slackers go. Some countries, particularly any that have ever been communist, actually do have universities that are like super high schools in that they lack freedom and choice.

This trope occurs in college-themed comedies a lot. Also, expect to see this in television shows starring a group of high schoolers that go off to [[CaliforniaUniversity college]] mid-series.

to:

The transition from high school to college is typically one of the biggest transitions you'll make in your entire life. Abruptly gone are things like principal's offices, standardized school scheduling scheduling, and forced/required teacher compassion. Similarly, "popular crowds" are mostly relegated to certain dormitories. And bullying becomes PassiveAggressiveKombat if anything. In college, no matter how athletic or smart you are, you're basically a nobody in the midst of a large and culturally-diverse student body. And, unlike in high school, your instructors and parents will not determine your general course of action. Your life plan is now completely up to you. On the plus side, it is easy to make friends by finding groups that match your interests, and thus lifelong outcasts can finally have a place where they belong.

Many television and movie writers, however, seem unusually clueless about how different college life really is from high school life. Thus, they'll apply many popular high school tropes to university settings. Sometimes this makes sense, and a few, such as the SadistTeacher, are if anything ''more'' plausible in a college setting. Far more often, however, the opposite is true, because they're either unrealistically below the maturity level of your typical college student, or simply not feasible within the general structure of university life. For example, a team of thuggish [[JerkJock football players]] [[BarbaricBully perpetually bullying a shy/awkward freshman]] is ''highly'' unlikely in a university setting since they will not live in the same building, attend the same classes classes, or have remotely the same schedule. Just as unlikely is a close-knit group of students having the exact same class schedule each semester.

One could argue that the reason why this trope exists is because most college-themed works are aimed at a high school audience. And, since most people would be uncomfortable watching "naive" high school students (for example) engaging in raunchy/anti-social behavior, writers instead use a college setting, while implementing enough high school tropes that their works will still be relatable to the average high schooler. In other instances, it's simply a matter of [[CriticalResearchFailure not doing the research]]. Sometimes, however, this trope will be justified by depicting the work's respective university as a subpar sub-par school where all the burnouts and slackers go. Some countries, particularly any that have ever been communist, actually do have universities that are like super high schools in that they lack freedom and choice.

This trope occurs in college-themed comedies a lot. Also, expect to see this trope in television shows starring a group of high schoolers that go off to [[CaliforniaUniversity college]] mid-series.
25th Nov '15 12:31:32 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Film/{{Accepted}}''
** Actually Justified and enforced, as it is a fake college for people who couldn't get into any real college due to a variety of reasons, mostly personality disorders, and are acting like immature people because that's what they believe college to be like.

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* ''Film/{{Accepted}}''
**
''Film/{{Accepted}}'': Actually Justified and enforced, as it is a fake college for people who couldn't get into any real college due to a variety of reasons, mostly personality disorders, and are acting like immature people because that's what they believe college to be like.
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