History Main / ClonesArePeopleToo

28th Apr '17 2:33:07 PM Kereea1
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Season six has a scene where Fives has a variation of this discussion with a droid, someone who is actually less of a person.

to:

** Season six has a scene where Fives has a variation of this discussion with a droid, someone who is actually less of a person. Interestingly enough part of his own affirmation of this trope two season before was "We are not droids."
27th Apr '17 2:03:39 PM JoeMerl
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Bizarre circumstances cause Grass Sword and Finn Sword to turn into a grass version of Finn, including with scrambled memories. After figuring out what's going on, Finn decides to help him adjust to new his existence. At first called "Grass Finn," the clone eventually decides to call himself Fern the Human.
27th Apr '17 1:59:24 PM JoeMerl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''ComicBook/PS238'', [[spoiler:Tyler]] is eventually cloned: The clone is an EmptyShell, however, with a remote control in place of a brain to let the original control it. The clone eventually, through some odd set of coincidences, gains a mind and sentience of its own, takes on the name "Toby", is legally accepted into the original's family as his brother, and becomes a character in his own right. [[spoiler:Furthermore, Toby is revealed to have superpowers -- something Tyler still hasn't got (and probably never will), leading to a brief stint of Tyler becoming afraid that his parents will accept Toby as their "real son" and disown Tyler (which ends up not only happening but his parents actually forgetting all about their actual son existing).]]

to:

* In ''ComicBook/PS238'', [[spoiler:Tyler]] is eventually cloned: The cloned, the clone is an EmptyShell, however, specifically designed with a remote control in place only part of a brain to let so that the original control it. The clone eventually, through some could use him as a spare body. (For the record, the original didn't know any of this.) Through an odd set of coincidences, gains a mind circumstances, the clone gained sapience, (politely) kicked [[spoiler:Tyler]] out of his body, grew the rest of his brain and sentience of its own, takes on the name "Toby", is legally accepted into wound up being adopted as the original's family as his brother, and becomes a character in his own right. [[spoiler:Furthermore, "Toby." [[spoiler:In fact, Toby is revealed to have winds up with ParentalFavoritism, since he has superpowers -- something and Tyler still hasn't got (and probably never will), leading to a brief stint of Tyler becoming afraid that his parents will accept Toby as their "real son" and disown Tyler (which ends up not only happening but his parents actually forgetting all about their actual son existing).]]doesn't]].



* ComicBook/TheVision is a [[BrainUploading mental clone]] of Wonder Man (even though, in practice, [[InformedAbility the two have never actually behaved very much alike)]], and his entire character arc has revolved around his attempts to live his own life. His lot in life has varied a lot over the years DependingOnTheWriter. Some writers give him a fair shake, but others seem to just inexplicably hate the poor guy.

to:

* ComicBook/TheVision is a [[BrainUploading mental clone]] of Wonder Man (even though, in practice, [[InformedAbility the two have never actually behaved very much alike)]], alike]]), and his entire character arc has revolved around his attempts to live his own life. His lot in life has varied a lot over the years DependingOnTheWriter. Some writers give him a fair shake, but others seem to just inexplicably hate the poor guy.
25th Apr '17 3:09:23 PM fruitstripegum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/BladeRunner'' - Rachael is a replicant designed to be as human-like as possible and to have a more complex backstory (in the form of implanted memories) than the others. Her creator treats her like a human, and ii's only when Deckard shows up that she starts to suspect that she isn't human.

to:

* ''Film/BladeRunner'' - Rachael is a replicant designed to be as human-like as possible and to have a more complex backstory (in the form of implanted memories) than the others. Her creator treats her like a human, and ii's it's only when Deckard shows up that she starts to suspect that she isn't human.



%% * ''{{Film/Moon}}''

to:

%% * ''{{Film/Moon}}''''{{Film/Moon}}'' - Despite the way Lunar Industries treats them, both Sam clones act very much like normal human beings.
22nd Apr '17 4:49:44 PM AthenaBlue
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Explored thoroughly in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E5TheAlmostPeople "The Almost People"]]/[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E6TheRebelFlesh "The Rebel Flesh"]]. The clones in this case are doppelgängers controlled by humans used to mine acid. During a solar storm, the doppelgängers gain consciousness. Since they retain all the memories of the humans, a conflict over whether or not both versions can exist ensues. Ultimately, only one version of each person survives, but some of the survivors are doppelgängers.

to:

** Explored thoroughly in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E5TheAlmostPeople [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E5TheRebelFlesh "The Rebel Flesh"]]/[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E6TheAlmostPeople "The Almost People"]]/[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E6TheRebelFlesh "The Rebel Flesh"]].People"]]. The clones in this case are doppelgängers controlled by humans used to mine acid. During a solar storm, the doppelgängers gain consciousness. Since they retain all the memories of the humans, a conflict over whether or not both versions can exist ensues. Ultimately, only one version of each person survives, but some of the survivors are doppelgängers.
22nd Apr '17 4:47:19 PM AthenaBlue
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In Creator/CJCherryh's ''Literature/AllianceUnion'' universe, the Union uses cloning extensively to build up their population. These are divided into "Parental Replicants" commissioned specifically by certain people (or to replace the deceased) who are treated as human beings, and "azi" (artificial zygote insemination) who are genetically engineered and copied for use as indentured servants, though the children of azi have the same rights as naturally born humans. In ''Literature/FortyThousandInGehenna'', a bunch of mostly azi colonists are dumped on a planet in order to create a LostColony (denying the planet to the Alliance).
* In Creator/RichardKMorgan's ''[[Literature/TakeshiKovacs Altered Carbon]]'', the protagonist uses BrainUploading to make a duplicate of himself near the end because his plan to bring down the BigBad requires him to be in two places at once. Each version of him acknowledges the other to be just as real and deserving of existence, but one of them has to go, and they settle it by reasonable conversation [[spoiler:and ultimately with a game of rocks/paper/scissors, with the loser being the one who gets deleted.]]
* In ''Literature/CourtshipRite'', most clans are busy with their {{super breeding program}}s, and don't bother with cloning, since identical genes are, by definition, not improved genes. The Liethe are the exception. Every Liethe secretly has a number of clone-sisters of varying ages, and no outsider ever learns the true identity of a Liethe. The outside world only meets fake personas which can be played by different clone-sisters in turn. The clones are very much different individuals with different skills. Some members of a clone group like the se-Tufi are always trained as assassins; the se-Tufi Who Walks In Humility is one such.
* ''Literature/{{Edenborn}}'': Halloween clones himself and sends the clone through the same virtual reality child-rearing he experienced, expecting another copy of himself. He is surprised when Deuce exhibits unique personality choices, but recognizes his individuality and takes him as a son.
* Cloning is commonplace in ''Literature/{{Genome}}'', and clones have all the same rights as normal people. In fact, highly-skilled people are often cloned multiple times in order to preserve their genetics. Clones often take the name of the original but add a middle name that consists of "C" (for "clone") and an ordinal number. For example, Peter C-the-forty-fourth Valk is the 44th clone of Peter Valk. While not outright mentioned, it can be assumed that the problems of CloneDegeneration have been solved, given that the main theme of the novel is that GeneticEngineeringIsTheNewNuke. This doesn't stop [[FantasticRacism some people from hating clones]], partly for the same reason people in RealLife hate illegal immigrants (i.e. taking jobs).
** The ''Dancing in the Snow'' prequel takes place a century earlier, prior to the genetic engineering boom, and the novel's central theme is cloning and free will. It's revealed that the BigBad of the novel is, in fact, a female clone of a genetic engineering genius (the only character to appear in the original novel), who resolves to change humanity with the help of dozens of clones of her own (both male and female). Whenever they find another clone, they explain the situation and then give the clone a choice, whether to accept a new set of memories from the original or not. Either way, the clone is welcome. [[spoiler:The protagonist turns out to be one of the clones but refuses to join them]].
* ''Literature/{{Heroics}}'': Part of the way to tell who the worst characters are is to see which ones treat [[CastingAShadow Alix]] [[CloningBlues Tolvaj]] as an actual person instead of a thing. Resident {{Jerkass}} Justin explicitly refers to her as an 'it'; BigBad Alice- [[AbusiveParents who Alix was cloned from]] -[[ExpendableClone treats her (and others like her) as a completely expendable tool]]; BigBad John Wechsler doesn't interact with her much but clearly sees her as nothing more than a wayward experiment; and [[spoiler: EvilAllAlong Stephanie]] wants her to be executed mostly just for existing. The rest of the main cast is much, ''much'' more welcoming.



* Most clones in the Literature/VorkosiganSaga world, where a clone is considered to be the child or sibling of person whose DNA it was made from, or the child of the person who commissioned the clone, depending on the planet and its laws. Mark Vorkosigan (Miles's clone) is an example of this, as he is considered Miles's brother and is treated as a completely different person. Clones as expendable property still exist on the lawless Jackson's Whole, though.
* Franchise/StarWarsLegends:
** This is the whole point of the ''Literature/RepublicCommandoSeries'' by Creator/KarenTraviss.
** Earlier, it was a subplot in the ''Literature/HandOfThrawn'' duology. A group of Imperial agents are all [[spoiler: clones of Baron Soontir Fel, ace pilot]], but they simply want to live out a normal life as farmers.
*** Even earlier, this got completely averted in the Thrawn trilogy. Clones are flash-grown expendable soldiers who feel wrong in the Force, the BigBad clone is a mentally unstable monster, and everyone's still terrified of clones because of what happened in the Clone Wars. [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness All because nobody told Zahn what happened in the Clone Wars.]] This got chalked up to inferior cloning tech after the fact.
** In ''Literature/DarkLordTheRiseOfDarthVader'', the clone troopers have unique personalities and disagree about how best to interpret orders. When Ion Team hears about Order 66 secondhand, they refuse to kill the Jedi they've worked under and allow Roan Shryne, Bol Chatak, and Olee Starstone to escape. Shryne and Starstone experience strongly mixed feelings when they find themselves forced to kill other clone troopers to survive. Some clones even allow for a bit of levity; when Climber meets up with Shryne again, they share a common joke about how the clones are hard to tell apart.
--->'''Shryne:''' The voice is familiar...\\
'''Climber:''' The face even more so.



* In ''Literature/LineOfDelirium'', cloning is highly illegal in TheEmpire, along with [[GeneticEngineeringIsTheNewNuke genetic engineering]]. It's eventually revealed that the protagonist Kay is a genetically-engineered "super" with enhanced strength, speed, intelligence, and linguistic capabilities. He finds out that the boy he's been escorting, who is supposed to be the son of Curtis van Curtis, the wealthiest man in the Empire, is, in fact, van Curtis's clone, although he's, more or less, raised as his son. Despite this, their personalities couldn't be more different, especially since Arthur (the clone) has already [[ResurrectiveImmortality died so many times]] that Kay doesn't think that Arthur can ever truly grow up (mentally that is). He also finds a boy named Tommy Arano, who turns out to be the original clone of Curtis van Curtis, who had his memory erased by aliens and adopted by a human family. Arthur was created under the mistaken assumption that the previous one was dead (memory erasure triggers [=aTan=] just like death). When they finally meet, Tommy is noticeably order than Arthur and considers himself Arthur's older brother. At the end of the novel, [[spoiler:Arthur joins his "father" beyond the Line, while Tommy opts to leave with Kay, proving that they're different]]. Inverted at the end of the sequel ''Emperors of Illusions'', where [[spoiler:Tommy is the one who decides to leave this universe and have another one created for him, while Arthur takes his place at Kay's side]]. It's stated that, if anyone finds out the truth about either Kay or Arthur/Tommy, his life would be forfeit under Imperial law.
* Played with in ''Literature/{{Neuromancer}}'' The Tessier-Ashpools made multiple clones of their children, of whom only 3Jane (the second clone of Jane Tessier-Ashpool) is a significant character, but old man Ashpool raped and killed multiple clones of his daughter.
* ''Literature/ThePrideOfParahumans'': Parahumans are sterile, so they reproduce by cloning. On Vesta Guild leaders buy so many clone progeny that they form "Cloneclans", most of whom go into the family business. But a few, such as Olga of Clan Wolf and [[spoiler: Maximus Griggs]] have a few differences of opinion from their progenitors.



* Cloning is commonplace in ''Literature/{{Genome}}'', and clones have all the same rights as normal people. In fact, highly-skilled people are often cloned multiple times in order to preserve their genetics. Clones often take the name of the original but add a middle name that consists of "C" (for "clone") and an ordinal number. For example, Peter C-the-forty-fourth Valk is the 44th clone of Peter Valk. While not outright mentioned, it can be assumed that the problems of CloneDegeneration have been solved, given that the main theme of the novel is that GeneticEngineeringIsTheNewNuke. This doesn't stop [[FantasticRacism some people from hating clones]], partly for the same reason people in RealLife hate illegal immigrants (i.e. taking jobs).
** The ''Dancing in the Snow'' prequel takes place a century earlier, prior to the genetic engineering boom, and the novel's central theme is cloning and free will. It's revealed that the BigBad of the novel is, in fact, a female clone of a genetic engineering genius (the only character to appear in the original novel), who resolves to change humanity with the help of dozens of clones of her own (both male and female). Whenever they find another clone, they explain the situation and then give the clone a choice, whether to accept a new set of memories from the original or not. Either way, the clone is welcome. [[spoiler:The protagonist turns out to be one of the clones but refuses to join them]].
* In ''Literature/CourtshipRite'', most clans are busy with their {{super breeding program}}s, and don't bother with cloning, since identical genes are, by definition, not improved genes. The Liethe are the exception. Every Liethe secretly has a number of clone-sisters of varying ages, and no outsider ever learns the true identity of a Liethe. The outside world only meets fake personas which can be played by different clone-sisters in turn. The clones are very much different individuals with different skills. Some members of a clone group like the se-Tufi are always trained as assassins; the se-Tufi Who Walks In Humility is one such.
* In Creator/CJCherryh's ''Literature/AllianceUnion'' universe the Union uses cloning extensively to build up their population. These are divided into "Parental Replicants" commissioned specifically by certain people (or to replace the deceased) who are treated as human beings, and "azi" (artificial zygote insemination) who are genetically engineered and copied for use as indentured servants, though the children of azi have the same rights as naturally born humans. In ''Literature/FortyThousandInGehenna'' a bunch of mostly azi colonists are dumped on a planet in order to create a LostColony (denying the planet to the Alliance).
* ''Literature/{{Edenborn}}'': Halloween clones himself and sends the clone through the same virtual reality child-rearing he experienced, expecting another copy of himself. He is surprised when Deuce exhibits unique personality choices, but recognizes his individuality and takes him as a son.

to:

* Cloning ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'':
** This
is commonplace the whole point of the ''Literature/RepublicCommandoSeries'' by Creator/KarenTraviss.
** Earlier, it was a subplot
in ''Literature/{{Genome}}'', and the ''Literature/HandOfThrawn'' duology. A group of Imperial agents are all [[spoiler: clones have all the same rights as of Baron Soontir Fel, ace pilot]], but they simply want to live out a normal people. In fact, highly-skilled people are often cloned multiple times in order to preserve their genetics. Clones often take the name of the original but add a middle name that consists of "C" (for "clone") and an ordinal number. For example, Peter C-the-forty-fourth Valk is the 44th clone of Peter Valk. While not outright mentioned, it can be assumed that the problems of CloneDegeneration have been solved, given that the main theme of the novel is that GeneticEngineeringIsTheNewNuke. This doesn't stop [[FantasticRacism some people from hating clones]], partly for the same reason people in RealLife hate illegal immigrants (i.e. taking jobs).
** The ''Dancing in the Snow'' prequel takes place a century
life as farmers.
*** Even
earlier, prior to this got completely averted in the genetic engineering boom, and Thrawn trilogy. Clones are flash-grown expendable soldiers who feel wrong in the novel's central theme is cloning and free will. It's revealed that Force, the BigBad of the novel is, in fact, a female clone of is a genetic engineering genius (the only character to appear in the original novel), who resolves to change humanity with the help of dozens mentally unstable monster, and everyone's still terrified of clones because of her own (both male what happened in the Clone Wars. [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness All because nobody told Zahn what happened in the Clone Wars.]] This got chalked up to inferior cloning tech after the fact.
** In ''Literature/DarkLordTheRiseOfDarthVader'', the clone troopers have unique personalities
and female). Whenever disagree about how best to interpret orders. When Ion Team hears about Order 66 secondhand, they refuse to kill the Jedi they've worked under and allow Roan Shryne, Bol Chatak, and Olee Starstone to escape. Shryne and Starstone experience strongly mixed feelings when they find another clone, they explain the situation and then give the themselves forced to kill other clone a choice, whether troopers to accept survive. Some clones even allow for a new set bit of memories from the original or not. Either way, the clone is welcome. [[spoiler:The protagonist turns out to be one of levity; when Climber meets up with Shryne again, they share a common joke about how the clones but refuses to join them]].
* In ''Literature/CourtshipRite'', most clans
are busy with their {{super breeding program}}s, and don't bother with cloning, since identical genes are, by definition, not improved genes. hard to tell apart.
--->'''Shryne:'''
The Liethe are the exception. Every Liethe secretly has a number of clone-sisters of varying ages, and no outsider ever learns the true identity of a Liethe. voice is familiar...\\
'''Climber:'''
The outside world only meets fake personas which can be played by different clone-sisters in turn. The clones are very much different individuals with different skills. Some members of a clone group like the se-Tufi are always trained as assassins; the se-Tufi Who Walks In Humility is one such.
* In Creator/CJCherryh's ''Literature/AllianceUnion'' universe the Union uses cloning extensively to build up their population. These are divided into "Parental Replicants" commissioned specifically by certain people (or to replace the deceased) who are treated as human beings, and "azi" (artificial zygote insemination) who are genetically engineered and copied for use as indentured servants, though the children of azi have the same rights as naturally born humans. In ''Literature/FortyThousandInGehenna'' a bunch of mostly azi colonists are dumped on a planet in order to create a LostColony (denying the planet to the Alliance).
* ''Literature/{{Edenborn}}'': Halloween clones himself and sends the clone through the same virtual reality child-rearing he experienced, expecting another copy of himself. He is surprised when Deuce exhibits unique personality choices, but recognizes his individuality and takes him as a son.
face even more so.



* Played with in ''Literature/{{Neuromancer}}'' The Tessier-Ashpools made multiple clones of their children, of whom only 3Jane (the second clone of Jane Tessier-Ashpool) is a significant character, but old man Ashpool raped and killed multiple clones of his daughter.
* ''Literature/ThePrideOfParahumans'': Parahumans are sterile, so they reproduce by cloning. On Vesta Guild leaders buy so many clone progeny that they form "Cloneclans", most of whom go into the family business. But a few, such as Olga of Clan Wolf and [[spoiler: Maximus Griggs]] have a few differences of opinion from their progenitors.
* ''[[Literature/{{Heroics}} Heroics]]'': Part of the way to tell who the worst characters are is to see which ones treat [[CastingAShadow Alix]] [[CloningBlues Tolvaj]] as an actual person instead of a thing. Resident {{Jerkass}} Justin explicitly refers to her as an 'it'; BigBad Alice- [[AbusiveParents who Alix was cloned from]] -[[ExpendableClone treats her (and others like her) as a completely expendable tool]]; BigBad John Wechsler doesn't interact with her much but clearly sees her as nothing more than a wayward experiment; and [[spoiler: EvilAllAlong Stephanie]] wants her to be executed mostly just for existing. The rest of the main cast is much, ''much'' more welcoming.
* In Creator/RichardKMorgan's ''[[Literature/TakeshiKovacs Altered Carbon]]'', the protagonist uses BrainUploading to make a duplicate of himself near the end because his plan to bring down the BigBad requires him to be in two places at once. Each version of him acknowledges the other to be just as real and deserving of existence, but one of them has to go, and they settle it by reasonable conversation [[spoiler:and ultimately with a game of rocks/paper/scissors, with the loser being the one who gets deleted.]]
* In ''Literature/LineOfDelirium'', cloning is highly illegal in TheEmpire, along with [[GeneticEngineeringIsTheNewNuke genetic engineering]]. It's eventually revealed that the protagonist Kay is a genetically-engineered "super" with enhanced strength, speed, intelligence, and linguistic capabilities. He finds out that the boy he's been escorting, who is supposed to be the son of Curtis van Curtis, the wealthiest man in the Empire, is, in fact, van Curtis's clone, although he's, more or less, raised as his son. Despite this, their personalities couldn't be more different, especially since Arthur (the clone) has already [[ResurrectiveImmortality died so many times]] that Kay doesn't think that Arthur can ever truly grow up (mentally that is). He also finds a boy named Tommy Arano, who turns out to be the original clone of Curtis van Curtis, who had his memory erased by aliens and adopted by a human family. Arthur was created under the mistaken assumption that the previous one was dead (memory erasure triggers [=aTan=] just like death). When they finally meet, Tommy is noticeably order than Arthur and considers himself Arthur's older brother. At the end of the novel, [[spoiler:Arthur joins his "father" beyond the Line, while Tommy opts to leave with Kay, proving that they're different]]. Inverted at the end of the sequel ''Emperors of Illusions'', where [[spoiler:Tommy is the one who decides to leave this universe and have another one created for him, while Arthur takes his place at Kay's side]]. It's stated that, if anyone finds out the truth about either Kay or Arthur/Tommy, his life would be forfeit under Imperial law.

to:

* Played with in ''Literature/{{Neuromancer}}'' The Tessier-Ashpools made multiple Most clones of their children, of whom only 3Jane (the second in the ''Literature/VorkosiganSaga'' world, where a clone of Jane Tessier-Ashpool) is a significant character, but old man Ashpool raped and killed multiple clones of his daughter.
* ''Literature/ThePrideOfParahumans'': Parahumans are sterile, so they reproduce by cloning. On Vesta Guild leaders buy so many clone progeny that they form "Cloneclans", most of whom go into
considered to be the family business. But a few, such as Olga child or sibling of Clan Wolf and [[spoiler: Maximus Griggs]] have a few differences of opinion from their progenitors.
* ''[[Literature/{{Heroics}} Heroics]]'': Part
person whose DNA it was made from, or the child of the way to tell who the worst characters are is to see which ones treat [[CastingAShadow Alix]] [[CloningBlues Tolvaj]] as an actual person instead of a thing. Resident {{Jerkass}} Justin explicitly refers to her as an 'it'; BigBad Alice- [[AbusiveParents who Alix was cloned from]] -[[ExpendableClone treats her (and others like her) commissioned the clone, depending on the planet and its laws. Mark Vorkosigan (Miles's clone) is an example of this, as he is considered Miles's brother and is treated as a completely different person. Clones as expendable tool]]; BigBad John Wechsler doesn't interact with her much but clearly sees her as nothing more than a wayward experiment; and [[spoiler: EvilAllAlong Stephanie]] wants her to be executed mostly just for existing. The rest of property still exist on the main cast is much, ''much'' more welcoming.
* In Creator/RichardKMorgan's ''[[Literature/TakeshiKovacs Altered Carbon]]'', the protagonist uses BrainUploading to make a duplicate of himself near the end because his plan to bring down the BigBad requires him to be in two places at once. Each version of him acknowledges the other to be just as real and deserving of existence, but one of them has to go, and they settle it by reasonable conversation [[spoiler:and ultimately with a game of rocks/paper/scissors, with the loser being the one who gets deleted.]]
* In ''Literature/LineOfDelirium'', cloning is highly illegal in TheEmpire, along with [[GeneticEngineeringIsTheNewNuke genetic engineering]]. It's eventually revealed that the protagonist Kay is a genetically-engineered "super" with enhanced strength, speed, intelligence, and linguistic capabilities. He finds out that the boy he's been escorting, who is supposed to be the son of Curtis van Curtis, the wealthiest man in the Empire, is, in fact, van Curtis's clone, although he's, more or less, raised as his son. Despite this, their personalities couldn't be more different, especially since Arthur (the clone) has already [[ResurrectiveImmortality died so many times]] that Kay doesn't think that Arthur can ever truly grow up (mentally that is). He also finds a boy named Tommy Arano, who turns out to be the original clone of Curtis van Curtis, who had his memory erased by aliens and adopted by a human family. Arthur was created under the mistaken assumption that the previous one was dead (memory erasure triggers [=aTan=] just like death). When they finally meet, Tommy is noticeably order than Arthur and considers himself Arthur's older brother. At the end of the novel, [[spoiler:Arthur joins his "father" beyond the Line, while Tommy opts to leave with Kay, proving that they're different]]. Inverted at the end of the sequel ''Emperors of Illusions'', where [[spoiler:Tommy is the one who decides to leave this universe and have another one created for him, while Arthur takes his place at Kay's side]]. It's stated that, if anyone finds out the truth about either Kay or Arthur/Tommy, his life would be forfeit under Imperial law.
lawless Jackson's Whole, though.



* ''Series/StargateSG1'':
** O'Neill's 16 year-old clone (who disturbingly does have his memories) is given the right to live his own life (paid for by the US Air Force no less). The (commented-on) difference between them as individuals comes at the end of the episode, when Young O'Neill chooses to go "back" to high school and do better this time, which Colonel O'Neill doesn't see the appeal of. Before that, they are exactly alike (which makes sense, as he (and the audience) was initially led to believe he was the colonel de-aged).
** Somewhat zigzagged with SG-1's robot clones, who are given the right to live and all... so long as they remain on their planet. The real SG-1 gets annoyed when their copies don't do this. [=Robot!O'Neill=] points out that they should have known they themselves would never have accepted such conditions. However, the duplicates get killed in action in their second appearance despite proving themselves "real" to the team.
* ''Series/StargateAtlantis'':
** The robots of the Atlantis team (via different means) are proven to be equals and real people to the team but still treated as {{redshirt}}s by the plot. It's kinda glaring whenever this happens - they've got all the skills that let the 'real' team survive ''hundreds'' of these scrapes and worse - ''plus'' they're made of much sturdier stuff than human flesh (the Atlantis versions even have a HealingFactor!). Though one possibility (with both the Atlantis team clones and the above) would be that the clones really ''don't want to live'' deep down and find ways to end their lives heroically.
** Dr Beckett's clone is welcomed by the team and treated immediately as an equal. It helps that the real Carson is dead so the clone is just filling the old one's position. This is the first to get the same PlotArmor the original enjoyed as well - apparently, so long as one is left, it doesn't matter which one. Rodney goes out of his way to make sure it's the case, due in part to SurvivorsGuilt over the original's death. When the clone suggests he joins a rescue mission, Rodney is the only one that refused, concerned that the others accepted "because he's a clone and they see him as expendable."
* In ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', it's revealed that during a TeleporterAccident on a planet where it's only safe to beam down every 4 years, a clone of Will Riker was left behind for the next 8 years. He's eventually rescued and welcomed as a full member of Starfleet under the name "Thomas Riker", though he later leaves to join the Maquis. Interestingly, since the Will Riker who came back from the planet was the result of a secondary transporter beam to shore up the failing pattern lock, it's debatable whether or not ''he'' should technically be considered the clone and Thomas the original.
* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'': In the episode where someone tried to frame Odo for murder, he did so by cloning himself, then disguising himself and killing the clone. When he's eventually found out, he is told "killing your own clone is still murder." The heroes accidentally create another clone and he is said to be welcomed into Bajoran society as a regular member (and hopefully will lead a better life than the original).
* Both times in ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' when the ship and crew were copied, they treated them with respect and allowed them to be their own beings. The copies from the Y/Demon class planet parted on good terms with the originals and were allowed to live their own life [[spoiler:and when they eventually forgot that they were clones, they went on the same journey as the originals. This ended badly as both crew and ship deteriorated without their original atmosphere, and at the end when they all die within a stone's throw of the crew (the only ones who could have saved them), it's played for all the drama it deserves.]] The second time was when a NegativeSpaceWedgie created two Voyagers in overlapping space with crew included; the only mistreatment brought out was an accident out of ignorance to the situation. [[spoiler:When the ships come under attack, one of the ships is sacrificed to save the other, and a couple of the crew come to the other whose counterparts had died in the accident; now and for the rest of the series, Harry Kim and Naomi Wildman are the ones from the ship that ''didn't'' survive, and thus would be considered the 'cloned' or 'alternate' versions. The real kicker, though, is that no one figures out which ship is the copy.]]
* Alexander Luthor is considered his own person in Series/{{Smallville}}, and not just a clone of Lex. Tess even raises him as her own son in an attempt to keep him from turning out like his progenitor. Eventually we find out that [[spoiler: half of his DNA comes from Clark]] and he changes his name to Conner Kent, becoming like Clark's little brother. As per the "[[NotWearingTights no tights, no flights]]" rule, we never hear the name "ComicBook/{{Superboy}}."
* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'':
** One episode has several characters "doubled" for the nefarious purposes of a [[ImAHumanitarian villain of weird tastes]], who repeatedly states that this is not cloning, but perfect duplication- or as he liked to call it, "twinning". Both copies of the protagonist, John Crichton, survive the episode, remaining as crew members and participating in a LoveTriangle with "himself" over their LoveInterest, Aeryn. When she made a choice (somewhat forced by the situation at hand), CloningBlues set in for the other guy.
-->"I hope he's having a good time-- No, wait, I hope he's having a TERRIBLE time. I just hope he treats her well."
** There's a reason for the villain's InsistentTerminology. The twinning process appears to distill some of the original's essence into each double - and neither is the original. People the villain had done it to over and over again, producing a horde of duplicates, had been reduced to (a horde of) savages.
** Eventually one Crichton gets killed, but not before conceiving a child with Aeryn, who will go on to raise the baby with the other Crichton.
* ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers:'' At the end of the late season 2 two-parter "Return Of The Green Ranger", Tom (the formerly evil clone of Tommy) stays in colonial Angel Grove to live out his life. And possibly becomes Tommy's ancestor.
* ''Series/{{Sliders}}:'' An episode late in the series revolves around this trope, on an alternate Earth where clones of wealthy individuals are grown and kept like animals for the purpose of organ transplants and blood transfusions. Naturally, one of the protagonists gets mistaken for his alternate's clone.

to:

* ''Series/StargateSG1'':
** O'Neill's 16 year-old clone (who disturbingly does
The humanoid-model Cylons in ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' vary on this. Numbers One, Two, Three, Four and Five don't get distinguishing characteristics from others of their own model, but Numbers Six and Eight (Seven is extinct) have his memories) is given the right to live his own life (paid for by the US Air Force no less). The (commented-on) difference between them as unique individuals comes at like Caprica-Six, Shelly Godfrey, Tough Six, Gina Inviere, Natalie Faust, Lida and Sonja (Sixes) and Boomer, Athena, "Fakeathena" and Sweet Eight (Eights) in addition to the end generic Sixes and Eights. They also vary on the memory-sharing factor. Athena downloaded Boomer's up to the point of the episode, when Young O'Neill chooses to go "back" to high school Miniseries and do better this time, which Colonel O'Neill doesn't see "Fakeathena" downloaded Athena's up to the appeal of. Before that, point of "Rapture", but they are exactly alike (which makes sense, as he (and the audience) was initially led to believe he was the colonel de-aged).
** Somewhat zigzagged with SG-1's robot clones, who are given the right to live and all... so long as they remain on their planet. The real SG-1 gets annoyed when their copies
don't do this. [=Robot!O'Neill=] points out that they should have known they themselves would never have accepted such conditions. However, the duplicates get killed in action in their second appearance despite proving themselves "real" this automatically and ([[AllThereInTheManual according to the team.
* ''Series/StargateAtlantis'':
** The robots
producers]]) models vary on how often they do it. Even sharing a good chuck of the Atlantis team (via memories didn't stop Boomer and Athena from developing in radically different means) are proven to be equals and real people to the team but still treated as {{redshirt}}s by the plot. It's kinda glaring whenever this happens - they've got all the skills that let the 'real' team survive ''hundreds'' of these scrapes and worse - ''plus'' they're made of much sturdier stuff than human flesh (the Atlantis versions even have a HealingFactor!). Though one possibility (with both the Atlantis team clones and the above) would be that the clones really ''don't want to live'' deep down and find ways to end their lives heroically.
** Dr Beckett's clone is welcomed by the team and treated immediately as an equal. It helps that the real Carson is dead so the clone is just filling the old one's position. This is the first to get the same PlotArmor the original enjoyed as well - apparently, so long as one is left, it doesn't matter which one. Rodney goes out of his way to make sure it's the case, due in part to SurvivorsGuilt over the original's death. When the clone suggests he joins a rescue mission, Rodney is the only one that refused, concerned that the others accepted "because he's a clone and they see him as expendable."
* In ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', it's revealed that during a TeleporterAccident on a planet where it's only safe to beam down every 4 years, a clone of Will Riker was left behind for the next 8 years. He's eventually rescued and welcomed as a full member of Starfleet under the name "Thomas Riker", though he later leaves to join the Maquis. Interestingly, since the Will Riker who came back from the planet was the result of a secondary transporter beam to shore up the failing pattern lock, it's debatable whether or not ''he'' should technically be considered the clone and Thomas the original.
* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'': In the episode where someone tried to frame Odo for murder, he did so by cloning himself, then disguising himself and killing the clone. When he's eventually found out, he is told "killing your own clone is still murder." The heroes accidentally create another clone and he is said to be welcomed into Bajoran society as a regular member (and hopefully will lead a better life than the original).
* Both times in ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' when the ship and crew were copied, they treated them with respect and allowed them to be their own beings. The copies from the Y/Demon class planet parted on good terms with the originals and were allowed to live their own life [[spoiler:and when they eventually forgot that they were clones, they went on the same journey as the originals. This ended badly as both crew and ship deteriorated without their original atmosphere, and at the end when they all die within a stone's throw of the crew (the only ones who could have saved them), it's played for all the drama it deserves.]] The second time was when a NegativeSpaceWedgie created two Voyagers in overlapping space with crew included; the only mistreatment brought out was an accident out of ignorance to the situation. [[spoiler:When the ships come under attack, one of the ships is sacrificed to save the other, and a couple of the crew come to the other whose counterparts had died in the accident; now and for the rest of the series, Harry Kim and Naomi Wildman are the ones from the ship that ''didn't'' survive, and thus would be considered the 'cloned' or 'alternate' versions. The real kicker, though, is that no one figures out which ship is the copy.]]
* Alexander Luthor is considered his own person in Series/{{Smallville}}, and not just a clone of Lex. Tess even raises him as her own son in an attempt to keep him from turning out like his progenitor. Eventually we find out that [[spoiler: half of his DNA comes from Clark]] and he changes his name to Conner Kent, becoming like Clark's little brother. As per the "[[NotWearingTights no tights, no flights]]" rule, we never hear the name "ComicBook/{{Superboy}}."
* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'':
** One episode has several characters "doubled" for the nefarious purposes of a [[ImAHumanitarian villain of weird tastes]], who repeatedly states that this is not cloning, but perfect duplication- or as he liked to call it, "twinning". Both copies of the protagonist, John Crichton, survive the episode, remaining as crew members and participating in a LoveTriangle with "himself" over their LoveInterest, Aeryn. When she made a choice (somewhat forced by the situation at hand), CloningBlues set in for the other guy.
-->"I hope he's having a good time-- No, wait, I hope he's having a TERRIBLE time. I just hope he treats her well."
** There's a reason for the villain's InsistentTerminology. The twinning process appears to distill some of the original's essence into each double - and neither is the original. People the villain had done it to over and over again, producing a horde of duplicates, had been reduced to (a horde of) savages.
** Eventually one Crichton gets killed, but not before conceiving a child with Aeryn, who will go on to raise the baby with the other Crichton.
* ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers:'' At the end of the late season 2 two-parter "Return Of The Green Ranger", Tom (the formerly evil clone of Tommy) stays in colonial Angel Grove to live out his life. And possibly becomes Tommy's ancestor.
* ''Series/{{Sliders}}:'' An episode late in the series revolves around this trope, on an alternate Earth where clones of wealthy individuals are grown and kept like animals for the purpose of organ transplants and blood transfusions. Naturally, one of the protagonists gets mistaken for his alternate's clone.
directions.



* In ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', Buffy's sister Dawn is technically a clone of Buffy, having been "made from the Slayer" by the Monks of Dagon. Initially, after this is discovered, some of the Scooby Gang want to treat Dawn as a made thing, but Buffy insists that she be treated as her sister.



* The humanoid-model Cylons in ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' vary on this. Numbers One, Two, Three, Four and Five don't get distinguishing characteristics from others of their own model, but Numbers Six and Eight (Seven is extinct) have unique individuals like Caprica-Six, Shelly Godfrey, Tough Six, Gina Inviere, Natalie Faust, Lida and Sonja (Sixes) and Boomer, Athena, "Fakeathena" and Sweet Eight (Eights) in addition to the generic Sixes and Eights. They also vary on the memory-sharing factor. Athena downloaded Boomer's up to the point of the Miniseries and "Fakeathena" downloaded Athena's up to the point of "Rapture", but they don't do this automatically and ([[AllThereInTheManual according to the producers]]) models vary on how often they do it. Even sharing a good chuck of memories didn't stop Boomer and Athena from developing in radically different directions.
* The whole point of ''Series/OrphanBlack''. The main character and several others are all from a batch of clones, but they have '''completely''' different personalities, in an absolute tour de force by the actress, Creator/TatianaMaslany.
** In fact, the clones having independent lives is part of the experiment, since most of them were put into fairly normal households and are allowed to live "normal" lives, while [[spoiler: being observed by "monitors" who report back to the Dyad.]]
* In ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'' episode "Replica", the clone in question, complete with the memories of the original, was created to replace the wife of a bioengineer who was wrongly thought to be irreversibly comatose. When the original awakens, a discussion begins of how to handle the copy, but murder is clearly off the table and instead their plan would allow the clone to have her own independent life.
* In ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', Buffy's sister Dawn is technically a clone of Buffy, having been "made from the Slayer" by the Monks of Dagon. Initially, after this is discovered, some of the Scooby Gang want to treat Dawn as a made thing, but Buffy insists that she be treated as her sister.



** In "The Doctor's Daughter," the Doctor's OppositeSexClone is a true badass who eventually earns her "father's" respect.
** In "Journey's End", the Doctor's duplicate is a ''very'' different individual from his progenitor and is given a happy ending as Rose Tyler's DoppelgangerReplacementLoveInterest.
** Explored thoroughly in "The Almost People"/"The Rebel Flesh." The clones in this case are doppelgängers controlled by humans used to mine acid. During a solar storm, the doppelgängers gain consciousness. Since they retain all the memories of the humans, a conflict over whether or not both versions can exist ensues. Ultimately, only one version of each person survives, but some of the survivors are doppelgängers.

to:

** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E6TheDoctorsDaughter "The Doctor's Daughter," Daughter"]]: the Doctor's OppositeSexClone is a true badass who eventually earns her "father's" respect.
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E13JourneysEnd "Journey's End", End"]], the Doctor's duplicate is a ''very'' different individual from his progenitor and is given a happy ending as Rose Tyler's DoppelgangerReplacementLoveInterest.
** Explored thoroughly in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E5TheAlmostPeople "The Almost People"/"The People"]]/[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E6TheRebelFlesh "The Rebel Flesh." Flesh"]]. The clones in this case are doppelgängers controlled by humans used to mine acid. During a solar storm, the doppelgängers gain consciousness. Since they retain all the memories of the humans, a conflict over whether or not both versions can exist ensues. Ultimately, only one version of each person survives, but some of the survivors are doppelgängers.



* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'':
** One episode has several characters "doubled" for the nefarious purposes of a [[ImAHumanitarian villain of weird tastes]], who repeatedly states that this is not cloning, but perfect duplication -- or as he liked to call it, "twinning". Both copies of the protagonist, John Crichton, survive the episode, remaining as crew members and participating in a LoveTriangle with "himself" over their LoveInterest, Aeryn. When she made a choice (somewhat forced by the situation at hand), CloningBlues set in for the other guy.
-->"I hope he's having a good time-- No, wait, I hope he's having a TERRIBLE time. I just hope he treats her well."
** There's a reason for the villain's InsistentTerminology. The twinning process appears to distill some of the original's essence into each double -- and neither is the original. People the villain had done it over and over again, producing a horde of duplicates, had been reduced to (a horde of) savages.
** Eventually one Crichton gets killed, but not before conceiving a child with Aeryn, who will go on to raise the baby with the other Crichton.




to:

* ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'': At the end of the late season 2 two-parter "Return of the Green Ranger", Tom (the formerly evil clone of Tommy) stays in colonial Angel Grove to live out his life. And possibly becomes Tommy's ancestor.
* The whole point of ''Series/OrphanBlack''. The main character and several others are all from a batch of clones, but they have '''completely''' different personalities, in an absolute tour de force by the actress, Creator/TatianaMaslany.
** In fact, the clones having independent lives is part of the experiment, since most of them were put into fairly normal households and are allowed to live "normal" lives, while [[spoiler: being observed by "monitors" who report back to the Dyad.]]
* In ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'' episode "Replica", the clone in question, complete with the memories of the original, was created to replace the wife of a bioengineer who was wrongly thought to be irreversibly comatose. When the original awakens, a discussion begins of how to handle the copy, but murder is clearly off the table and instead their plan would allow the clone to have her own independent life.
* ''Series/{{Sliders}}:'' An episode late in the series revolves around this trope, on an alternate Earth where clones of wealthy individuals are grown and kept like animals for the purpose of organ transplants and blood transfusions. Naturally, one of the protagonists gets mistaken for his alternate's clone.
* Alexander Luthor is considered his own person in Series/{{Smallville}}, and not just a clone of Lex. Tess even raises him as her own son in an attempt to keep him from turning out like his progenitor. Eventually we find out that [[spoiler: half of his DNA comes from Clark]] and he changes his name to Conner Kent, becoming like Clark's little brother. As per the "[[NotWearingTights no tights, no flights]]" rule, we never hear the name "ComicBook/{{Superboy}}."
* ''Series/StargateSG1'':
** O'Neill's 16 year-old clone (who, disturbingly, does have his memories) is given the right to live his own life (paid for by the US Air Force no less). The (commented-on) difference between them as individuals comes at the end of the episode, when Young O'Neill chooses to go "back" to high school and do better this time, which Colonel O'Neill doesn't see the appeal of. Before that, they are exactly alike (which makes sense, as he (and the audience) was initially led to believe he was the colonel de-aged).
** Somewhat zigzagged with SG-1's robot clones, who are given the right to live and all... so long as they remain on their planet. The real SG-1 gets annoyed when their copies don't do this. [=Robot!O'Neill=] points out that they should have known they themselves would never have accepted such conditions. However, the duplicates get killed in action in their second appearance despite proving themselves "real" to the team.
* ''Series/StargateAtlantis'':
** The robots of the Atlantis team (via different means) are proven to be equals and real people to the team but still treated as {{redshirt}}s by the plot. It's kinda glaring whenever this happens - they've got all the skills that let the 'real' team survive ''hundreds'' of these scrapes and worse - ''plus'' they're made of much sturdier stuff than human flesh (the Atlantis versions even have a HealingFactor!). Though one possibility (with both the Atlantis team clones and the above) would be that the clones really ''don't want to live'' deep down and find ways to end their lives heroically.
** Dr Beckett's clone is welcomed by the team and treated immediately as an equal. It helps that the real Carson is dead so the clone is just filling the old one's position. This is the first to get the same PlotArmor the original enjoyed as well - apparently, so long as one is left, it doesn't matter which one. Rodney goes out of his way to make sure it's the case, due in part to SurvivorsGuilt over the original's death. When the clone suggests he joins a rescue mission, Rodney is the only one that refused, concerned that the others accepted "because he's a clone and they see him as expendable."
* In ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', it's revealed that during a TeleporterAccident on a planet where it's only safe to beam down every 4 years, a clone of Will Riker was left behind for the next 8 years. He's eventually rescued and welcomed as a full member of Starfleet under the name "Thomas Riker", though he later leaves to join the Maquis. Interestingly, since the Will Riker who came back from the planet was the result of a secondary transporter beam to shore up the failing pattern lock, it's debatable whether or not ''he'' should technically be considered the clone and Thomas the original.
* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'': In the episode where someone tried to frame Odo for murder, he did so by cloning himself, then disguising himself and killing the clone. When he's eventually found out, he is told "killing your own clone is still murder." The heroes accidentally create another clone and he is said to be welcomed into Bajoran society as a regular member (and hopefully will lead a better life than the original).
* Both times in ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' when the ship and crew were copied, they treated them with respect and allowed them to be their own beings. The copies from the Y/Demon class planet parted on good terms with the originals and were allowed to live their own life [[spoiler:and when they eventually forgot that they were clones, they went on the same journey as the originals. This ended badly as both crew and ship deteriorated without their original atmosphere, and at the end when they all die within a stone's throw of the crew (the only ones who could have saved them), it's played for all the drama it deserves.]] The second time was when a NegativeSpaceWedgie created two Voyagers in overlapping space with crew included; the only mistreatment brought out was an accident out of ignorance to the situation. [[spoiler:When the ships come under attack, one of the ships is sacrificed to save the other, and a couple of the crew come to the other whose counterparts had died in the accident; now and for the rest of the series, Harry Kim and Naomi Wildman are the ones from the ship that ''didn't'' survive, and thus would be considered the 'cloned' or 'alternate' versions. The real kicker, though, is that no one figures out which ship is the copy.]]



* ''{{WesternAnimation/The Batman}}'' has the episode "The Everywhere Man" exploring this. The villain of the show is the clone of an inventor who created a duplication device. Each clone starts as an identical copy of its original, until it gains self-awareness (and, for some reason, becomes increasingly worse than its original), and sometimes grows disgruntled with its creator. Clone n°1 deals with this by basically killing his clones [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness once they're no longer useful to him]] or if they start rebelling. Some of the clones are okay with this, some of them... aren't.

to:

* ''{{WesternAnimation/The Batman}}'' In ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'', Lemongrab's clone was specifically made to be a friend (or [[HoYay boyfriend]]) to the original Lemongrab. He and Lemongrab get along exceedingly well and clearly love each other. (They even start a family together. However, they do still bicker every once in a while.) Other people treat the second Lemongrab in the same manner that they treat the original. Princess Bubblegum treats both of them like her two annoying children- with clear impatience, but compassion.
** In "Another Five More Short Graybles", [[spoiler:Lemongrab 2 ends up rebelling against the original and getting partially eaten for his trouble. From here on out, he becomes more independent, showing mercy toward their Lemon-children and encouraging Lemonhope to flee with Bubblegum before being devoured whole.]]
* ''WesternAnimation/TheBatman''
has the episode "The Everywhere Man" exploring this. The villain of the show is the clone of an inventor who created a duplication device. Each clone starts as an identical copy of its original, until it gains self-awareness (and, for some reason, becomes increasingly worse than its original), and sometimes grows disgruntled with its creator. Clone n°1 deals with this by basically killing his clones [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness once they're no longer useful to him]] or if they start rebelling. Some of the clones are okay with this, some of them... aren't.



* In the pilot of ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'', despite the fact that the clones were created as {{Expendable Clone}}s, Yoda takes this attitude, telling the clones with him, "Smaller in number are we, but larger in mind." The Clonetroopers themselves naturally take this attitude, seeing each other as brothers, and over any period of time tend to start differentiating themselves with varying hairstyles, facial hair, and tattoos in addition to customizing and marking their armor.
** Other episodes have looked into this as well - Captain Rex and Commander Cody are treated as unique characters with different personalities, one deserter has a life outside the war, yet another betrayed the Republic out of resentment towards the clones' status, and so on.
** One time saw Rex telling off [[GeneralRipper General Krell]] about treating his men as expendable and that not only did he have a duty to follow orders, but also to see them through. [[spoiler: Unfortunately, Krell had different reasons for wanting so many clones dead...]]
** "The Hidden Enemy": [[spoiler: TheMole is a clone who realized the Clone Army was slavery]].
** Season six has a scene where Fives has a variation of this discussion with a droid, someone who is actually less of a person.
* By the time we see the three clones again in the SequelSeries ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'', [[RetiredBadass Rex, Gregor, and Wolffe]] are even more individuated both in temperament and appearance. See the three old wardogs in the trope image.
* In ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' the copy of Enzo is ''encouraged'' to be a different person than the original Enzo. [[NinetiesAntiHero Given what happened to the original]], this is a good idea.
** Bob's friends (including the copy of Enzo) attempt to cheer him up by citing this trope when he's led to believe that he's a copy of another Bob that shows up in Mainframe. [[spoiler: Subverted when they find out that the other Bob is actually a trojan horse with stolen bits of Bob's code.]]

to:

* In the pilot Cubert of ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'', despite the fact that the clones were created as {{Expendable Clone}}s, Yoda takes this attitude, telling the clones with him, "Smaller in number are we, but larger in mind." The Clonetroopers themselves naturally take this attitude, seeing each other as brothers, and over any period of time tend to start differentiating themselves with varying hairstyles, facial hair, and tattoos in addition to customizing and marking their armor.
** Other episodes have looked into this as well - Captain Rex and Commander Cody are treated as unique characters with different personalities, one deserter has a life outside the war, yet another betrayed the Republic out of resentment towards the clones' status, and so on.
** One time saw Rex telling off [[GeneralRipper General Krell]] about treating his men as expendable and that not only did he have a duty to follow orders, but also to see them through. [[spoiler: Unfortunately, Krell had different reasons for wanting so many clones dead...]]
** "The Hidden Enemy": [[spoiler: TheMole
''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' is a clone who realized the Clone Army was slavery]].
** Season six has a scene where Fives has a variation
of this discussion with a droid, someone who is actually less of a person.
* By the time we see the three clones again in the SequelSeries ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'', [[RetiredBadass Rex, Gregor,
Professor Farnsworth. He's treated like his son and Wolffe]] are even more individuated both in temperament and appearance. See the three old wardogs in the trope image.
* In ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' the copy of Enzo
is ''encouraged'' to be a different person than the original Enzo. [[NinetiesAntiHero Given what happened to the original]], this is a good idea.
** Bob's
friends (including the copy of Enzo) attempt with Hermes' son Dwight. The only time being a clone seemed to cheer him up by citing affect his personal life was when it became apparent that he didn't technically have a birthday but this trope when he's led to believe that he's a copy of another Bob that shows up in Mainframe. [[spoiler: Subverted when they find out that was remedied by celebrating the other Bob is actually a trojan horse with stolen bits of Bob's code.]]day the professor scraped the growth off his back he used to create him instead.



* In ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'', Lemongrab's clone was specifically made to be a friend (or [[HoYay boyfriend]]) to the original Lemongrab. He and Lemongrab get along exceedingly well and clearly love each other. (They even start a family together. However, they do still bicker every once in a while.) Other people treat the second Lemongrab in the same manner that they treat the original. Princess Bubblegum treats both of them like her two annoying children- with clear impatience, but compassion.
** In "Another Five More Short Graybles," [[spoiler:Lemongrab 2 ends up rebelling against the original and getting partially eaten for his trouble. From here on out, he becomes more independent, showing mercy toward their Lemon-children and encouraging Lemonhope to flee with Bubblegum before being devoured whole.]]



* In ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'', the copy of Enzo is ''encouraged'' to be a different person than the original Enzo. [[NinetiesAntiHero Given what happened to the original]], this is a good idea.
** Bob's friends (including the copy of Enzo) attempt to cheer him up by citing this trope when he's led to believe that he's a copy of another Bob that shows up in Mainframe. [[spoiler: Subverted when they find out that the other Bob is actually a trojan horse with stolen bits of Bob's code.]]
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': In [[Recap/StarWarsTheCloneWarsS1E1Ambush "Ambush"]], the series premiere, despite the fact that the clones were created as {{Expendable Clone}}s, Yoda takes this attitude, telling the clones with him, "Smaller in number are we, but larger in mind." The clone troopers themselves naturally take this attitude, seeing each other as brothers, and over any period of time tend to start differentiating themselves with varying hairstyles, facial hair, and tattoos in addition to customizing and marking their armor.
** Other episodes have looked into this as well -- Captain Rex and Commander Cody are treated as unique characters with different personalities, one deserter has a life outside the war, yet another betrayed the Republic out of resentment towards the clones' status, and so on.
** One time saw Rex telling off [[GeneralRipper General Krell]] about treating his men as expendable and that not only did he have a duty to follow orders, but also to see them through. [[spoiler: Unfortunately, Krell had different reasons for wanting so many clones dead...]]
** "The Hidden Enemy": [[spoiler: TheMole is a clone who realized the Clone Army was slavery.]]
** Season six has a scene where Fives has a variation of this discussion with a droid, someone who is actually less of a person.
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'': By the time we see the three clones again, [[RetiredBadass Rex, Gregor, and Wolffe]] are even more individuated both in temperament and appearance. See the three old wardogs in the trope image.
* This is explored in an episode of the second season of ''WesternAnimation/{{WITCH}}'' when Will creates a copy who are normally little more than mindless drones, but the BigBad gives the copy sentience. [[spoiler: Unfortunately Clone!Will ends up preforming a HeroicSacrifice, though her and Will combine.]]



* Cubert of ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' is a clone of Professor Farnsworth. He's treated like his son and is good friends with Hermes' son Dwight. The only time being a clone seemed to affect his personal life was when it became apparent that he didn't technically have a birthday but this was remedied by celebrating the day the professor scraped the growth off his back he used to create him instead.
* This is explored in an episode of the second season of ''WesternAnimation/{{WITCH}}'' when Will creates a copy who are normally little more than mindless drones, but the BigBad gives the copy sentience. [[spoiler: Unfortunately Clone!Will ends up preforming a HeroicSacrifice, though her and Will combine.]]
14th Apr '17 11:55:56 AM fruitstripegum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


%% * ''Film/BladeRunner''

to:

%% * ''Film/BladeRunner''''Film/BladeRunner'' - Rachael is a replicant designed to be as human-like as possible and to have a more complex backstory (in the form of implanted memories) than the others. Her creator treats her like a human, and ii's only when Deckard shows up that she starts to suspect that she isn't human.
14th Apr '17 8:00:48 AM fruitstripegum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


%% * Bizarro. He even has his own planet.

to:

%% * Bizarro. Bizarro is an imperfect clone of Superman. He even has his own planet.planet, consisting of imperfect clones of Superman's friends and family.
13th Apr '17 5:28:33 AM fruitstripegum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''[[FanFic/SovereignGFCOrigins Origins]]'', a ''VideoGame/MassEffect''[=/=]''Franchise/StarWars''[[spoiler:[=/=]''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}''[=/=]''[=Halo=]'']] MassiveMultiplayerCrossover Athena is a [[LEGOGenetics fusion]] of her highly-trained predecessors, relying on GeneticMemory to take only the best from each. However, she is her own character and the fact that she is a clone never really comes up. Her sisters created by Atlas (later taken by Jakobs) were made for an [[ExpendableClone entirely different purpose]].

to:

* In ''[[FanFic/SovereignGFCOrigins Origins]]'', a ''VideoGame/MassEffect''[=/=]''Franchise/StarWars''[[spoiler:[=/=]''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}''[=/=]''[=Halo=]'']] ''VideoGame/MassEffect''[=/=]''Franchise/StarWars''[[spoiler:[=/=]''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}''[=/=]''VideoGame/{{Halo}}'']] MassiveMultiplayerCrossover Athena is a [[LEGOGenetics fusion]] of her highly-trained predecessors, relying on GeneticMemory to take only the best from each. However, she is her own character and the fact that she is a clone never really comes up. Her sisters created by Atlas (later taken by Jakobs) were made for an [[ExpendableClone entirely different purpose]].
9th Apr '17 12:06:19 PM fruitstripegum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''[[FanFic/SovereignGFCOrigins Origins]]'', a ''VideoGame/MassEffect''[=/=]''Franchise/StarWars''[[spoiler:[=/=]''[=Borderlands=]''[=/=]''[=Halo=]'']] MassiveMultiplayerCrossover Athena is a [[LEGOGenetics fusion]] of her highly-trained predecessors, relying on GeneticMemory to take only the best from each. However, she is her own character and the fact that she is a clone never really comes up. Her sisters created by Atlas (later taken by Jakobs) were made for an [[ExpendableClone entirely different purpose]].

to:

* In ''[[FanFic/SovereignGFCOrigins Origins]]'', a ''VideoGame/MassEffect''[=/=]''Franchise/StarWars''[[spoiler:[=/=]''[=Borderlands=]''[=/=]''[=Halo=]'']] ''VideoGame/MassEffect''[=/=]''Franchise/StarWars''[[spoiler:[=/=]''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}''[=/=]''[=Halo=]'']] MassiveMultiplayerCrossover Athena is a [[LEGOGenetics fusion]] of her highly-trained predecessors, relying on GeneticMemory to take only the best from each. However, she is her own character and the fact that she is a clone never really comes up. Her sisters created by Atlas (later taken by Jakobs) were made for an [[ExpendableClone entirely different purpose]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 371. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ClonesArePeopleToo