History Main / ChainedToARailway

5th Nov '17 12:26:04 PM Kickisund
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* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'', this was Bluto's first very first method of capturing Olive. There he tied her up ''with the tracks''. Olive Oyl would pull her arms out of the constricting tracks to wave and holler, then ''put them back into the tracks''. How does Popeye save her? By ''punching the train into scrap with '''''one''''' blow!''

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* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'', this was Bluto's first very first method of capturing Olive. There When he tied her up ''with the tracks''. tracks'', Olive Oyl would pull her arms out of the constricting tracks to wave and holler, then ''put them back into the tracks''. How does Popeye save her? By ''punching the train into scrap with '''''one''''' blow!''
19th Oct '17 6:06:24 AM Joyce13
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* This trope is referenced in the song "The Happiest Home in These Hills" from ''Film/PetesDragon1977", with the two sons in the Gogan family singing (among the many awful things they plan to do to Pete for running away) "Tie him screaming to a railroad track".

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* This trope is referenced in the song "The Happiest Home in These Hills" from ''Film/PetesDragon1977", ''Film/PetesDragon1977'', with the two sons in the Gogan family singing (among the many awful things they plan to do to Pete for running away) "Tie him screaming to a railroad track".
19th Oct '17 6:05:16 AM Joyce13
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* This trope is referenced in the song "The Happiest Home in These Hills" from ''Film/PetesDragon1977", with the two sons in the Gogan family singing (among the many awful things they plan to do to Pete for running away) "Tie him screaming to a railroad track".
16th Oct '17 5:46:14 PM nombretomado
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* The No Way Out poster for 2012 had DanielBryan be the victim of this at the hands of former love interest Wrestling/AJLee The coloring of the poster and the costumes of both played up the melodramatic stereotype of the act.

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* The No Way Out poster for 2012 had DanielBryan Wrestling/DanielBryan be the victim of this at the hands of former love interest Wrestling/AJLee The coloring of the poster and the costumes of both played up the melodramatic stereotype of the act.
5th Oct '17 9:46:51 PM KidDynamite
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* Chicago's 1974 TV special "Meanwhile Back At The Ranch" is filled with old silent movie gags. One has a gender flip of this, with guitarist Terry Kath being tied up on the tracks by the villain, Anne Murray.

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* Chicago's Music/{{Chicago}}'s 1974 TV special "Meanwhile Back At The Ranch" is filled with old silent movie gags. One has a gender flip of this, with guitarist Terry Kath being tied up on the tracks by the villain, Anne Murray.
16th Aug '17 1:34:16 AM foxley
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* [[ComicBook/SergioAragonesDestroysDC Sergio Aragones Destroys DC]] has one pair of tied damsels on the splash panel for his Superman story (keep magnifying glass handy).

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* [[ComicBook/SergioAragonesDestroysDC ''[[ComicBook/SergioAragonesDestroysDC Sergio Aragones Destroys DC]] DC]]'' has one pair of tied damsels on the splash panel for his Superman story (keep magnifying glass handy).handy).
* In ''Sensation Comics'' #26, ComicBook/WonderWoman is tied to the railway tracks with what she thinks is her magic lasso. It isn't as [[ItMakesSenseInContext her mother has stolen her lasso and replaced it with a copy]]. Once she realises it is a fake, she is able to break loose and [[{{Trainstopping}} stop the train by lifting the locomotive off the tracks]].
12th Aug '17 12:39:30 PM john_e
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* An [[http://www.bromley-coppard.com/Stoatsnest/ attempt]] to film such a scene in 1907 ended in disaster when [[FatalMethodActing the train didn't stop in time]].
28th Jul '17 2:46:11 PM jamespolk
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This familiar scenario first appeared in the 1867 short story "[[http://cdl.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/moa/pageviewer?frames=1&cite=http%3A%2F%2Fcdl.library.cornell.edu%2Fcgi-bin%2Fmoa%2Fmoa-cgi%3Fnotisid%3DACB8727-0003-99&coll=moa&view=50&root=%2Fmoa%2Fgala%2Fgala0003%2F&tif=00672.TIF&pagenum=653 Captain Tom's Fright]]", although a more rudimentary form of it was seen on stage in 1863 in the play ''The Engineer''. However, it really entered the meme pool as a result of its inclusion in the 1867 play ''[[http://www.josephhaworth.com/images/Producers%20&%20Managers/Augustin%20Daly/Under_the_Gaslight-Poster-cepia-Resized.jpg Under the Gaslight]]'', by Augustin Daly. (Interestingly, in ''Gaslight'' the victim is a male, not a fair maiden) By 1868, it reportedly could be found in five different London plays all running at the same time, and remained a theatre staple for decades. The earliest known use of this trope in movies was the 1913 Keystone Komedy film ''Barney Oldfield's Race for a Life'', where it was played for comedy. It's commonly associated with the 1914 film serial ''ThePerilsOfPauline'', but [[BeamMeUpScotty this is probably due to confusion]] (no one knows for sure, since neither the full serial nor the script have survived).

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This familiar scenario first appeared in the 1867 short story "[[http://cdl.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/moa/pageviewer?frames=1&cite=http%3A%2F%2Fcdl.library.cornell.edu%2Fcgi-bin%2Fmoa%2Fmoa-cgi%3Fnotisid%3DACB8727-0003-99&coll=moa&view=50&root=%2Fmoa%2Fgala%2Fgala0003%2F&tif=00672.TIF&pagenum=653 Captain Tom's Fright]]", although a more rudimentary form of it was seen on stage in 1863 in the play ''The Engineer''. However, it really entered the meme pool as a result of its inclusion in the 1867 play ''[[http://www.josephhaworth.com/images/Producers%20&%20Managers/Augustin%20Daly/Under_the_Gaslight-Poster-cepia-Resized.jpg Under the Gaslight]]'', by Augustin Daly. (Interestingly, in ''Gaslight'' the victim is a male, not a fair maiden) By 1868, it reportedly could be found in five different London plays all running at the same time, and remained a theatre staple for decades. The earliest known use of this trope in movies was the 1913 Keystone Komedy film ''Barney Oldfield's Race for a Life'', where it was played for comedy. It's commonly associated with the 1914 film serial ''ThePerilsOfPauline'', ''Film/ThePerilsOfPauline'', but [[BeamMeUpScotty this is probably due to confusion]] (no one knows for sure, since neither the full serial nor the script have survived).
21st Jun '17 11:26:26 AM nighttrainfm
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* In ''WesternAnimation/MarvelsSpiderMan'', Peter does this to himself accidentally. During a fight in the subway, he gets knocked into a tunnel wall - and the impact damages his web-shooter, pinning him there with webbing just as a train's coming. He uses the other shooter to throw a lever that makes the train change tracks.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/MarvelsSpiderMan'', Peter does this to himself accidentally. During a fight in the subway, he gets knocked into a tunnel wall - and the impact damages his web-shooter, pinning him there with webbing just as a train's coming.train approaches. He uses the other shooter to throw a lever that makes the train change tracks.
21st Jun '17 11:26:14 AM nighttrainfm
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''WesternAnimation/MarvelsSpiderMan'', Peter does this to himself accidentally. During a fight in the subway, he gets knocked into a tunnel wall - and the impact damages his web-shooter, pinning him there with webbing just as a train's coming. He uses the other shooter to throw a lever that makes the train change tracks.
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