History Main / BreakableWeapons

20th May '17 10:16:36 AM nombretomado
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* Many of the games in the ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'' series had a glass sword which could kill almost any enemy in one shot, but would break afterwards.

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* Many of the games in the ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Ultima}}'' series had a glass sword which could kill almost any enemy in one shot, but would break afterwards.
16th Apr '17 3:56:59 PM DastardlyDemolition
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* The weapons in ''VideoGame/FarCry 2'' degrade over time, losing effectiveness. Eventually, they'll start jamming more and more often, and will [[ShurFineGuns blow up altogether]] if the player continues using them. Luckily, weapons purchased from the gun stores are always brand-new, and you get an infinite supply of replacements for any gun you've purchased before. Guns picked up from enemies, on the other hand, tend to be rather old and beat-up; it's better just to snag their ammo. The guns themselves are ridiculously bad, however. There is no way a dart rifle (with no propellant fouling) explodes after 15 shots. The actual ridiculing [[http://www.imfdb.org/index.php/Far_Cry_2 can be found at IMFDB]].

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* The weapons in ''VideoGame/FarCry 2'' ''VideoGame/FarCry2'' degrade over time, losing effectiveness. Eventually, they'll start jamming more and more often, and will [[ShurFineGuns blow up altogether]] if the player continues using them. Luckily, weapons purchased from the gun stores are always brand-new, and you get an infinite supply of replacements for any gun you've purchased before. Guns picked up from enemies, on the other hand, tend to be rather old and beat-up; it's better just to snag their ammo. The guns themselves are ridiculously bad, however. There is no way a dart rifle (with no propellant fouling) explodes after 15 shots. The actual ridiculing [[http://www.imfdb.org/index.php/Far_Cry_2 can be found at IMFDB]]. The most practical weapons are the ones least likely to break in long fire fights: the AK-47, M79 grenade launcher, the LPO-90 Flamethrower, and the SVD sniper rifle.
27th Feb '17 12:12:02 AM Arivne
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** The ''Oriental Adventures'' sourcebook had a "weapon breaker" combat manouever that had a chance to break an opponents weapon - however if used on an "unbreakable" weapon it would fail and there was a good chance you'd break your own weapon instead.

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** The ''Oriental Adventures'' sourcebook had a "weapon breaker" combat manouever that had a chance to break an opponents weapon - however opponent's weapon. However, if used on an "unbreakable" weapon it would fail and there was a good chance you'd break your own weapon instead.
27th Feb '17 12:10:12 AM Arivne
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14th Feb '17 2:53:02 PM ILikeRobots
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** The series has had this trope since the beginning ([[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness with the exception of Gaiden]], and ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates''), and broken weapons usually cannot be repaired. This is the case for ''every'' unit, even ones without physical weapons (such as healers and mages). Even the legendary weapons have limited durability (except in certain cases like the Falchion in [[VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea the original]] and ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Awakening]],'' and the Ragnell in ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Path of Radiance]]''). Certain games have repairable weapons (that when broken gain a statset and a name of "Broken Sword"), but most of the time if a weapon breaks it's gone. One interesting piece is that weapons have always had a fixed number of uses (A "Steel Sword" will always break after exactly 35 hits), rather than random rolls or a a "durability" stats that goes down at an unknown rate, and that Fire Emblem generally has limited money, making money management another factor of the game's strategy. As a general rule, cheaper weapons and staves have more uses, and are still quite effective in the right hands, so it's strategic to have run-of-the-mill equipment as a back-up for fights/heals that don't need the good stuff.

to:

** The series has had this trope since the beginning ([[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness with the exception of Gaiden]], and ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates''), and broken weapons usually cannot be repaired. This is the case for ''every'' unit, even ones without physical weapons (such as healers and mages). Even the legendary weapons have limited durability (except in certain cases like the Falchion in [[VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea [[VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight the original]] and ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Awakening]],'' and the Ragnell in ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Path of Radiance]]'').''VideoGame/FireEmblemPathOfRadiance''). Certain games have repairable weapons (that when broken gain a statset and a name of "Broken Sword"), but most of the time if a weapon breaks it's gone. One interesting piece is that weapons have always had a fixed number of uses (A "Steel Sword" will always break after exactly 35 hits), rather than random rolls or a a "durability" stats that goes down at an unknown rate, and that Fire Emblem generally has limited money, making money management another factor of the game's strategy. As a general rule, cheaper weapons and staves have more uses, and are still quite effective in the right hands, so it's strategic to have run-of-the-mill equipment as a back-up for fights/heals that don't need the good stuff.



** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Path of Radiance/Radiant Dawn]]'', there's a skill called Corrosion that can wear down opponents' equipped weapons.

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** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Path of Radiance/Radiant Dawn]]'', ''VideoGame/FireEmblemPathOfRadiance'' and its sequel ''Videogame/FireEmblemRadiantDawn'', there's a skill called Corrosion that can wear down opponents' equipped weapons.



** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]'', [[spoiler: a Goddess blesses all your character's currently equipped weapons, making them unbreakable like the Ragnell and Alondite.]]
** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Genealogy of the Holy War]]'', you can repair pretty much any and all weapons, including broken ones, simply by visiting the castle town shops and paying a corresponding fee (up to 1000 gold per use on legendary weapons). Which is rather more less convenient than it sounds when you realize that each unit has its own bag of cash that can only be transferred to another unit under very limited circumstances and healers tend to have trouble acquiring money. Particularly ironic in that if a legendary weapon isn't one of the Unbreakable Weapons, it's a lot more brittle than a run of the mill Iron Sword.
** ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon]]'' has an item that when held in one's inventory nullifies weapon degradation. Also, one can buy character specific weapons like the Rapier and Wing Spear from some shops. Also, two used weapons of the same type can be combined into a single, more durable weapon between battles. There's also a single repair item, and Falchion itself, once you get it, is indestructible. (Amusingly, the main character Chrom is still using Falchion hundreds of years later in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening,'' and yes, it's still indestructible.)
** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: The Blazing Blade]]'', Lyn's Legendary Weapon, the Mani Katti, has its uses restored between the two times when you get to use her, or a new Mani Katti will be given to Lyn altogether if you manage to break it in the first part. Since the game's main story, which is part of the prequel canon for ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade'', starts with Eliwood in Chapter 11, and it's been some time between Lyn's 10th chapter and Eliwood's 11th chapter, it's assumed that it didn't literally break in Lyn's little story mode, even if the player did so while playing through that section.

to:

** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]'', ''VideoGame/FireEmblemRadiantDawn'', [[spoiler: a Goddess blesses all your character's currently equipped weapons, making them unbreakable like the Ragnell and Alondite.]]
** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Genealogy of the Holy War]]'', ''VideoGame/FireEmblemGenealogyOfTheHolyWar'', you can repair pretty much any and all weapons, including broken ones, simply by visiting the castle town shops and paying a corresponding fee (up to 1000 gold per use on legendary weapons). Which is rather more less convenient than it sounds when you realize that each unit has its own bag of cash that can only be transferred to another unit under very limited circumstances and healers tend to have trouble acquiring money. Particularly ironic in that if a legendary weapon isn't one of the Unbreakable Weapons, it's a lot more brittle than a run of the mill Iron Sword.
** ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon]]'' has an item that when held in one's inventory nullifies weapon degradation. Also, one can buy character specific weapons like the Rapier and Wing Spear from some shops. Also, two used weapons of the same type can be combined into a single, more durable weapon between battles. There's also a single repair item, and Falchion itself, once you get it, is indestructible. (Amusingly, the main character Chrom is still using Falchion hundreds of years later in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening,'' and yes, it's still indestructible.)
** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: The Blazing Blade]]'', ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBlazingBlade'', Lyn's Legendary Weapon, the Mani Katti, has its uses restored between the two times when you get to use her, or a new Mani Katti will be given to Lyn altogether if you manage to break it in the first part. Since the game's main story, which is part of the prequel canon for ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade'', starts with Eliwood in Chapter 11, and it's been some time between Lyn's 10th chapter and Eliwood's 11th chapter, it's assumed that it didn't literally break in Lyn's little story mode, even if the player did so while playing through that section.
14th Feb '17 1:20:50 PM ILikeRobots
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** The series has had this trope since the beginning, ([[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness with the exception of Gaiden]], and ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates''), and broken weapons usually cannot be repaired. This is the case for ''every'' unit, even ones without physical weapons (such as healers and mages). Even the legendary weapons have limited durability (except in certain cases like the Falchion in [[VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea the original]] and ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Awakening]],'' and the Ragnell in ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Path of Radiance]]''). Certain games have repairable weapons (that when broken gain a statset and a name of "Broken Sword"), but most of the time if a weapon breaks it's gone. One interesting piece is that weapons have always had a fixed number of uses (A "Steel Sword" will always break after exactly 35 hits), rather than random rolls or a a "durability" stats that goes down at an unknown rate, and that Fire Emblem generally has limited money, making money management another factor of the game's strategy. As a general rule, cheaper weapons and staves have more uses, and are still quite effective in the right hands, so it's strategic to have run-of-the-mill equipment as a back-up for fights/heals that don't need the good stuff.

to:

** The series has had this trope since the beginning, beginning ([[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness with the exception of Gaiden]], and ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates''), and broken weapons usually cannot be repaired. This is the case for ''every'' unit, even ones without physical weapons (such as healers and mages). Even the legendary weapons have limited durability (except in certain cases like the Falchion in [[VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea the original]] and ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Awakening]],'' and the Ragnell in ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Path of Radiance]]''). Certain games have repairable weapons (that when broken gain a statset and a name of "Broken Sword"), but most of the time if a weapon breaks it's gone. One interesting piece is that weapons have always had a fixed number of uses (A "Steel Sword" will always break after exactly 35 hits), rather than random rolls or a a "durability" stats that goes down at an unknown rate, and that Fire Emblem generally has limited money, making money management another factor of the game's strategy. As a general rule, cheaper weapons and staves have more uses, and are still quite effective in the right hands, so it's strategic to have run-of-the-mill equipment as a back-up for fights/heals that don't need the good stuff.
14th Feb '17 1:19:57 PM ILikeRobots
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** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: The Blazing Blade]]'', Lyn's Legendary Weapon, the Mani Katti, has its uses restored between the two times when you get to use her, or a new Mani Katti will be given to Lyn altogether if you manage to break it in the first part. Since the game's main story, which is part of the prequel canon for ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade]]'', starts with Eliwood in Chapter 11, and it's been some time between Lyn's 10th chapter and Eliwood's 11th chapter, it's assumed that it didn't literally break in Lyn's little story mode, even if the player did so while playing through that section.

to:

** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: The Blazing Blade]]'', Lyn's Legendary Weapon, the Mani Katti, has its uses restored between the two times when you get to use her, or a new Mani Katti will be given to Lyn altogether if you manage to break it in the first part. Since the game's main story, which is part of the prequel canon for ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade]]'', ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade'', starts with Eliwood in Chapter 11, and it's been some time between Lyn's 10th chapter and Eliwood's 11th chapter, it's assumed that it didn't literally break in Lyn's little story mode, even if the player did so while playing through that section.
14th Feb '17 1:19:00 PM ILikeRobots
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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' has had this trope since the beginning ([[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness except Gaiden]] and ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates''), and broken weapons usually cannot be repaired. This is the case for ''every'' unit, even ones without physical weapons (such as healers and mages). Even the legendary weapons have limited durability (except in certain cases like the Falchion in [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia the original]] and ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Awakening]]'' and the Ragnell in ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Path of Radiance]]''). Certain games have repairable weapons (that when broken gain a statset and a name of "Broken Sword"), but most of the time if a weapon breaks it's gone. One interesting piece is that weapons have always had a fixed number of uses (A "Steel Sword" will always break after exactly 35 hits), rather than random rolls or a a "durability" stats that goes down at an unknown rate, and that Fire Emblem generally has limited money, making money management another factor of the game's strategy. As a general rule, cheaper weapons and staves have more uses, and are still quite effective in the right hands, so it's strategic to have run-of-the-mill equipment as a back-up for fights\heals that don't need the good stuff.

to:

* ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblem:''
** The series
has had this trope since the beginning beginning, ([[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness except Gaiden]] with the exception of Gaiden]], and ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates''), and broken weapons usually cannot be repaired. This is the case for ''every'' unit, even ones without physical weapons (such as healers and mages). Even the legendary weapons have limited durability (except in certain cases like the Falchion in [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia [[VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea the original]] and ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Awakening]]'' Awakening]],'' and the Ragnell in ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Path of Radiance]]''). Certain games have repairable weapons (that when broken gain a statset and a name of "Broken Sword"), but most of the time if a weapon breaks it's gone. One interesting piece is that weapons have always had a fixed number of uses (A "Steel Sword" will always break after exactly 35 hits), rather than random rolls or a a "durability" stats that goes down at an unknown rate, and that Fire Emblem generally has limited money, making money management another factor of the game's strategy. As a general rule, cheaper weapons and staves have more uses, and are still quite effective in the right hands, so it's strategic to have run-of-the-mill equipment as a back-up for fights\heals fights/heals that don't need the good stuff.



** ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon]]'' has an item that when held in one's inventory nullifies weapon degradation. Also, one can buy character specific weapons like the Rapier and Wing Spear from some shops. Also, two used weapons of the same type can be combined into a single, more durable weapon between battles. There's also a single repair item, and Falchion itself, once you get it, is indestructible. (Amusingly, the main character Chrom is still using Falchion hundreds of years later in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening,'' and yes, it's still indestructible.)
** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword]]'', Lyn's Legendary Weapon, the Mani Katti, has its uses restored between the two times when you get to use her, or a new Mani Katti will be given to Lyn altogether if you manage to break it in the first part. Since the game's main story, which is part of the prequel canon for ''Sword of Seals'', starts with Eliwood in Chapter 11, and it's been some time between Lyn's 10th chapter and Eliwood's 11th chapter, it's assumed that it didn't literally break in Lyn's little story mode, even if the player did so while playing through that section.

to:

** ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon]]'' has an item that when held in one's inventory nullifies weapon degradation. Also, one can buy character specific weapons like the Rapier and Wing Spear from some shops. Also, two used weapons of the same type can be combined into a single, more durable weapon between battles. There's also a single repair item, and Falchion itself, once you get it, is indestructible. (Amusingly, the main character Chrom is still using Falchion hundreds of years later in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening,'' and yes, it's still indestructible.)
** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: The Blazing Sword]]'', Blade]]'', Lyn's Legendary Weapon, the Mani Katti, has its uses restored between the two times when you get to use her, or a new Mani Katti will be given to Lyn altogether if you manage to break it in the first part. Since the game's main story, which is part of the prequel canon for ''Sword of Seals'', ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade]]'', starts with Eliwood in Chapter 11, and it's been some time between Lyn's 10th chapter and Eliwood's 11th chapter, it's assumed that it didn't literally break in Lyn's little story mode, even if the player did so while playing through that section.
17th Jan '17 3:53:07 PM GothicProphet
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1st Jan '17 1:24:40 PM BattleMaster
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** Early editions had optional rules where a player who makes a very unfortunate attack roll could break his own weapon, or suffer some other similar calamity, at the referee's discretion. With 3rd Edition rules, players can specifically attack an opponent's weapon or shield in an attempt to break ("sunder") it, just like any other object or material.

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** Early editions had optional rules where a player who makes a very unfortunate attack roll could break his own weapon, or suffer some other similar calamity, at the referee's discretion. With 3rd Edition rules, players can specifically attack an opponent's weapon or shield in an attempt to break ("sunder") it, just like any other object or material. Due to its complexity and the fact that it meant that it meant destroying valuable magical equipment, it was largely regarded as a ScrappyMechanic rather than a viable tactic.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.BreakableWeapons