History Main / BodyBackupDrive

9th Sep '16 12:40:22 AM PaulA
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* In the Creator/OrsonScottCard short story "Fat Farm", the protagonist, a glutton, has his mind moved to new, svelte cloned bodies on a regular basis. The KarmicTwistEnding is that the "cast-off bodies," who expect to be coddled, are instead pressed into slave labor. The 'original' is their boss.

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* In the Creator/OrsonScottCard short story "Fat Farm", Farm" (collected in ''Literature/MapsInAMirror''), the protagonist, a glutton, has his mind moved to new, svelte cloned bodies on a regular basis. The KarmicTwistEnding is that the "cast-off bodies," who expect to be coddled, are instead pressed into slave labor. The 'original' is their boss.boss, who treats them harshly because he hates them as tangible evidence that the version of him now living his life keeps on making the same bad decisions.
13th Aug '16 7:23:51 PM FactoidCow
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It's not uncommon for death not to be permanent in {{Fiction}}. In this case, a character survives their death by having their consciousness (and/or mind and/or soul) transferred to a replacement body, prepared just for that eventuality. This body is often a clone of the character, although this is not the case for robotic characters, naturally.

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It's not uncommon for death not to be permanent in {{Fiction}}. In this case, a character survives their death by having their consciousness (and/or mind and/or soul) transferred to a replacement body, prepared just for that eventuality. This body is often a [[CloningGambit clone of the character, character]], although this is not the case for robotic characters, naturally.



See also BrainUploading, BornAsAnAdult, JustifiedExtraLives, OnlyOneMeAllowedRightNow, and HeartDrive.

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See also BrainUploading, BornAsAnAdult, CloningGambit, JustifiedExtraLives, OnlyOneMeAllowedRightNow, and HeartDrive.
16th Jul '16 8:24:53 PM siberia82
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* ''Film/XMenApocalypse'': En Sabah Nur is introduced performing a transfer of his consciousness into another body (that of a regenerating mutant) through a ritual inside a pyramid that is [[ThePowerOfTheSun powered by the sun]]. Later in the film, he builds a new gigantic pyramid in Cairo to perform the ritual on [[spoiler:Charles Xavier]].
7th Jun '16 5:26:45 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''VideoGame/AssaultOnDarkAthena'': The Athena uses disposable cyborg drones as meat suits that can be accessed by anyone from a drone control station. Riddick at one point breaks into one and turns it against the mercs. Every time they kill a drone, Riddick can just "jack in" again and activate the next one in line; this is even necessary to advance beyond a DeadlyRotaryFan.
7th Apr '16 4:21:33 AM HellYesOtters
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* In ''Literature/AncillaryJustice'', [[TheEmperor Anaander Mianaai]] has [[HiveMind a few thousand]] running around to oversee [[TheEmpire the Radch's]] expansion, giving him an odd sort of functional immortality.

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* In ''Literature/AncillaryJustice'', [[TheEmperor Anaander Mianaai]] has [[HiveMind a few thousand]] running around to oversee [[TheEmpire the Radch's]] expansion, giving him her an odd sort of functional immortality.
20th Mar '16 1:44:40 PM MarkLungo
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* Spartan from ''WildCATs'' had this ability, being an android and all.

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* Spartan from ''WildCATs'' ''ComicBook/WildCATs'' had this ability, being an android and all.



* In the MarvelUniverse, the original Hate-Monger is what you get if you apply this concept to UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler.

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* In the MarvelUniverse, Franchise/MarvelUniverse, the original Hate-Monger is what you get if you apply this concept to UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler.



* In ''FanFic/{{Fractured}}'', a ''MassEffect''[=/=]''StarWars''[=/=]''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' [[MassiveMultiplayerCrossover crossover]], the Reapers destroy Pandora's New-U system, forcing the Vault Hunters to be extremely careful as they attempt to hijack a Hyperion starship. [[{{Badass}} They survive anyway.]] The system remains out of commission in [[FanFic/SovereignGFCOrigins the sequel]] as well, in which several characters [[DiscussedTrope comment on]] missing the tech.

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* In ''FanFic/{{Fractured}}'', a ''MassEffect''[=/=]''StarWars''[=/=]''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' ''Franchise/MassEffect''[=/=]''Franchise/StarWars''[=/=]''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' [[MassiveMultiplayerCrossover crossover]], the Reapers destroy Pandora's New-U system, forcing the Vault Hunters to be extremely careful as they attempt to hijack a Hyperion starship. [[{{Badass}} They survive anyway.]] The system remains out of commission in [[FanFic/SovereignGFCOrigins the sequel]] as well, in which several characters [[DiscussedTrope comment on]] missing the tech.



* In the Literature/TakeshiKovacs series everyone is implanted with a cortical stack that essentially acts as a hard drive for the brain and allows people to be [[BrainUploading "resleeved"]] in a new body when they die. However most people can't afford to be resleeved more than once and unless they shell out a lot of cash they have to go through the whole aging process again.

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* In the Literature/TakeshiKovacs ''Literature/TakeshiKovacs'' series everyone is implanted with a cortical stack that essentially acts as a hard drive for the brain and allows people to be [[BrainUploading "resleeved"]] in a new body when they die. However most people can't afford to be resleeved more than once and unless they shell out a lot of cash they have to go through the whole aging process again.



* Literature/VorkosiganSaga: Some very rich and very evil people clone themselves, then when the clones are in their twenties have their brain transplanted into the clone's body. Mark has made it his life's work to eliminate this practice, by inventing a life-extension technology that does not depend on committing murder.

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* Literature/VorkosiganSaga: ''Literature/VorkosiganSaga'': Some very rich and very evil people clone themselves, then when the clones are in their twenties have their brain transplanted into the clone's body. Mark has made it his life's work to eliminate this practice, by inventing a life-extension technology that does not depend on committing murder.



* In Creator/JohnVarley's Literature/EightWorlds series, the technology exists to make a copy of a person's memories, and to grow a clone from a tissue sample. Life insurance now consists of going in for annual (or more often, if you can afford it) backups of your memories, and if you get killed, your insurance company grows a clone, and loads your memories into it. Having more than one of you running around at once is very illegal, however, and any extra clones discovered are subject to summary destruction. This allows at least one unscrupulous character to create slaves with no rights or recourse, since their very existence is a crime.

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* In Creator/JohnVarley's Literature/EightWorlds ''Literature/EightWorlds'' series, the technology exists to make a copy of a person's memories, and to grow a clone from a tissue sample. Life insurance now consists of going in for annual (or more often, if you can afford it) backups of your memories, and if you get killed, your insurance company grows a clone, and loads your memories into it. Having more than one of you running around at once is very illegal, however, and any extra clones discovered are subject to summary destruction. This allows at least one unscrupulous character to create slaves with no rights or recourse, since their very existence is a crime.



* In the latter (by internal timeline) books of Creator/AndreyLivadny's ''Literature/TheHistoryOfTheGalaxy'' series, the introduction of a piece of ImportedAlienPhlebotinum potentially grants humans this ability. The logrs are tiny {{Data Crystal}}s which also act as incredibly powerful computers, invented by the [[StarfishAliens Logrians]] millions of years ago. Their primary purpose was to preserve the consciousnesses of dead Logrians via BrainUploading. A logr is powerful enough to contain the consciousness of a living being and, when attached to the Logris, an enormous supercomputer made up of billions of logrs, can allow that person to live in indefinitely in a constructed virtual world. After humans get their hands on the technology, it quickly becomes clear that it would be extremely easy to invoke this trope by making a cloned body for the deceased person and download the uploaded consciousness from a logr into it. In fact, several characters end up doing exactly that. However, the [[TheFederation Confederacy]] government bans the practice for two main reasons: first, the Logrians are strictly against it, fearful of ImmortalityImmorality, as evidenced by the so-called [[HumanAlien Harramin]] Immortal Quota, who have been doing this very thing for nearly 3 million years, and second, this becomes a nightmare for concepts like inheritance. After all, if a person dies and then comes back, then is it right to deprive his or her heirs of what is coming to them? A sort-of solution is found by recruiting volunteers from {{Virtual Ghost}}s. They are offered a chance to explore and settle faraway worlds in new bodies, thus starting new lives, completely separate from their old lives.

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* In the latter later (by internal timeline) books of Creator/AndreyLivadny's ''Literature/TheHistoryOfTheGalaxy'' series, the introduction of a piece of ImportedAlienPhlebotinum potentially grants humans this ability. The logrs are tiny {{Data Crystal}}s which also act as incredibly powerful computers, invented by the [[StarfishAliens Logrians]] millions of years ago. Their primary purpose was to preserve the consciousnesses of dead Logrians via BrainUploading. A logr is powerful enough to contain the consciousness of a living being and, when attached to the Logris, an enormous supercomputer made up of billions of logrs, can allow that person to live in indefinitely in a constructed virtual world. After humans get their hands on the technology, it quickly becomes clear that it would be extremely easy to invoke this trope by making a cloned body for the deceased person and download the uploaded consciousness from a logr into it. In fact, several characters end up doing exactly that. However, the [[TheFederation Confederacy]] government bans the practice for two main reasons: first, the Logrians are strictly against it, fearful of ImmortalityImmorality, as evidenced by the so-called [[HumanAlien Harramin]] Immortal Quota, who have been doing this very thing for nearly 3 million years, and second, this becomes a nightmare for concepts like inheritance. After all, if a person dies and then comes back, then is it right to deprive his or her heirs of what is coming to them? A sort-of solution is found by recruiting volunteers from {{Virtual Ghost}}s. They are offered a chance to explore and settle faraway worlds in new bodies, thus starting new lives, completely separate from their old lives.



* The re-imagined Cylons of ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'' download into new bodies, so long as there's a Resurrection Ship in range. Even the dog-level-intelligence Raider ships resurrect.

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* The re-imagined Cylons of ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'' ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' download into new bodies, so long as there's a Resurrection Ship in range. Even the dog-level-intelligence Raider ships resurrect.



* ''CarWars''. A duelist can arrange to have Gold Cross grow a clone from his cells and store a copy of his mind. If he dies, his mind is downloaded into the clone and the player continues to use the character.

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* ''CarWars''.''TabletopGame/CarWars''. A duelist can arrange to have Gold Cross grow a clone from his cells and store a copy of his mind. If he dies, his mind is downloaded into the clone and the player continues to use the character.



* ''{{GURPS}} Ultratech'' includes technologies to make "backups", the ''TranshumanSpace'' setting reserves that ability for infomorphs (i.e. AIs and [[VirtualGhost Ghosts]]) as BrainUploading requires the meat brain to be dissected.

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* ''{{GURPS}} ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}} Ultratech'' includes technologies to make "backups", the ''TranshumanSpace'' ''TabletopGame/TranshumanSpace'' setting reserves that ability for infomorphs (i.e. AIs and [[VirtualGhost Ghosts]]) as BrainUploading requires the meat brain to be dissected.



* The [[OurElvesAreDifferent Eldar]] in Warhammer 40,000 half use this trope. They carry soulstones to capture their souls when they die. Although they don't get new Eldar bodies they can be used to control equipment, effectively giving them new robot bodies instead. One craftworld is known for using many more vehicles than normal. This is not because they're any better at it, it's just that they were nearly wiped out at one point and are forced to rely on their dead to form the bulk of their army.

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* The [[OurElvesAreDifferent Eldar]] in Warhammer 40,000 ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' half use this trope. They carry soulstones to capture their souls when they die. Although they don't get new Eldar bodies they can be used to control equipment, effectively giving them new robot bodies instead. One craftworld is known for using many more vehicles than normal. This is not because they're any better at it, it's just that they were nearly wiped out at one point and are forced to rely on their dead to form the bulk of their army.



* Dead characters in ''EveOnline'' automatically download into clone bodies.
** The same is true in Dust 514, set in the same universe.

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* Dead characters in ''EveOnline'' ''VideoGame/EveOnline'' automatically download into clone bodies.
** The same is true in Dust 514, ''Dust 514'', set in the same universe.



* M. Bison from Series/StreetFighter never stays dead. Ever. He's been canonically killed off no less than two times now, (including one where Akuma sent his soul to Hell) and each time he always comes back in a new body. His story in ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIV'' starts off with him waiting in a [[PeopleJars medical tank]], growing impatient while his scientists ready his new body. He plans on transferring over to one of the new clone bodies he created, one in particular named Seth, who has already gained his own self-awareness and will not surrender his body without a fight.

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* M. Bison from Series/StreetFighter ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' never stays dead. Ever. He's been canonically killed off no less than two times now, (including one where Akuma sent his soul to Hell) and each time he always comes back in a new body. His story in ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIV'' starts off with him waiting in a [[PeopleJars medical tank]], growing impatient while his scientists ready his new body. He plans on transferring over to one of the new clone bodies he created, one in particular named Seth, who has already gained his own self-awareness and will not surrender his body without a fight.



* All the named robots in ''{{Vexxarr}}'' have numerous backups. It first came up Minionbot briefly converted to Zen in an early arc but changed his mind when Carl threatened to overwrite his backup disc with [=MP3s=], he later got a set of spare heads in case of LogicBomb. Carl himself has a closet full of fully aware backups.

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* All the named robots in ''{{Vexxarr}}'' ''Webcomic/{{Vexxarr}}'' have numerous backups. It first came up Minionbot briefly converted to Zen in an early arc but changed his mind when Carl threatened to overwrite his backup disc with [=MP3s=], he later got a set of spare heads in case of LogicBomb. Carl himself has a closet full of fully aware backups.



* Most Inner and Middle sphere polities in ''OrionsArm'' have routine backups mandatory for their citizens. Though there are a couple exceptions who don't subscribe to "pattern continuity theory" and consider backups to be different people than the originals, at most a legal heir.

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* Most Inner and Middle sphere polities in ''OrionsArm'' ''WebOriginal/OrionsArm'' have routine backups mandatory for their citizens. Though there are a couple exceptions who don't subscribe to "pattern continuity theory" and consider backups to be different people than the originals, at most a legal heir.



* Used on occasion in ''{{Transformers}}'':

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* Used on occasion in ''{{Transformers}}'':''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'':



** Also, in ''TransformersEnergon'', after Demolisher is blown up, Megatron builds him a new body and sticks his spark into it, but not before reformatting it to remove Demolisher's pesky morality.
* Robots built in ''{{WesternAnimation/Futurama}}'' have a wireless backup unit that save a copy of them every day, so if their bodies get killed, they'd just [[HeartDrive download into another body]]. [[spoiler:With the notable exception of Bender.]]

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** Also, in ''TransformersEnergon'', ''Anime/TransformersEnergon'', after Demolisher is blown up, Megatron builds him a new body and sticks his spark into it, but not before reformatting it to remove Demolisher's pesky morality.
* Robots built in ''{{WesternAnimation/Futurama}}'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' have a wireless backup unit that save a copy of them every day, so if their bodies get killed, they'd just [[HeartDrive download into another body]]. [[spoiler:With the notable exception of Bender.]]



* In the ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' episode, "Days of Future Future", Homer died and it was revealed that a mad scientist had made clones of him so that he has backups. He ended up dying over a hundred times in the next thirty years.

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* In the ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' episode, "Days episode "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS25E18DaysOfFutureFuture Days of Future Future", Future]]", Homer died and it was revealed that a mad scientist Professor Frink had made clones of him so that he has backups. He ended up dying over a hundred times in the next thirty years.
17th Mar '16 5:39:42 PM ObsidianFire
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* Subverted with Motoko Kusanagi in ''Franchise/GhostInTheShell'', who often has various spare bodies that she can control by remote or switch her consciousness into whenever she needs. She's GenreSavvy enough to know when she's probably going to get killed (and with her skills, the possibility of coming even close to killing her almost never happens) and uses a remote body instead. Worst case scenario, her cyberbrain is all that is left and needs to be put into a new body, but otherwise she's CrazyPrepared for these situations.

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* Subverted with Motoko Kusanagi in ''Franchise/GhostInTheShell'', who often has various spare bodies that she can control by remote or switch her consciousness into whenever she needs. She's GenreSavvy smart enough to know when she's probably going to get killed (and with her skills, the possibility of coming even close to killing her almost never happens) and uses a remote body instead. Worst case scenario, her cyberbrain is all that is left and needs to be put into a new body, but otherwise she's CrazyPrepared for these situations.



* [[AiIsACrapshoot Two]]'s favourite method of escaping in ''ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures'', usually when the situation is truly desperate,like risking to being deleted or blown up. Being DangerouslyGenreSavvy, he tries his best from stopping his "twin" One in doing the same.

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* [[AiIsACrapshoot Two]]'s favourite method of escaping in ''ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures'', usually when the situation is truly desperate,like risking to being deleted or blown up. Being DangerouslyGenreSavvy, he He tries his best from stopping his "twin" One in doing the same.
9th Mar '16 1:24:07 AM tsstevens
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** ''Anime/RebuildOfEvangelion'' suggests she is horrified by the Dummy System, a digital version of this, thus she would be completely opposed to using her for something so completely barbaric.
10th Feb '16 8:29:12 AM Anddrix
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* Diehard of ''{{Youngblood}}'' had this as one of his abilities in the earlier issues.

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* Diehard of ''{{Youngblood}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Youngblood}}'' had this as one of his abilities in the earlier issues.
3rd Feb '16 4:10:14 PM DeisTheAlcano
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** The New-U stations are controlled by the Hyperion Corporation, who are the main bad guys throughout all of ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'', yet still work for the player, though not for other characters. The reason being is that one: Hyperion is still profiting from your deaths, two: Handsome Jack will not allow you to die unless he does it personally with his own two hands, and three: Angel may hack Hyperion technology to lend you assistance. [[spoiler: Why it works when Jack is fighting you personally and Angel is destroyed is anyone's guess.]]
* ''[=VitaStations=] serve a similar function for the protagonists of ''VideoGame/BioShock1'' and [[VideoGame/BioShock2 the sequel]].

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** * The New-U stations are controlled by the Hyperion Corporation, who are the main bad guys throughout all of ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands 2}}'', yet still work for the player, though not for other characters. The reason being is that one: Hyperion is still profiting from your deaths, two: Handsome Jack will not allow you to die unless he does it personally with his own two hands, and three: Angel may hack Hyperion technology to lend you assistance. [[spoiler: Why it works when Jack is fighting you personally and Angel is destroyed is anyone's guess.]]
* ''[=VitaStations=] serve a similar function for Vita-Chambers automatically revive the protagonists of ''VideoGame/BioShock1'' and [[VideoGame/BioShock2 the sequel]].''VideoGame/BioShock2''.
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