History Main / BloodOnTheDebateFloor

12th Jun '17 8:18:49 PM MaxBrain
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* The Provisional Commonwealth Government in ''VideoGame/Fallout4'' was an early attempt to form a legislature in the post-war Commonwealth. The way Nick Valentine tells it, an Institute Synth murdered every representative in the room, bringing this endeavor to a swift end. [[spoiler:Father tells it differently, claiming that the Synth was the only one left after all the other representatives killed each other. Old holotapes corroborate this narrative.]]

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* The Provisional Commonwealth Provisional Government in ''VideoGame/Fallout4'' was an early attempt to form a legislature in the post-war Commonwealth. The way Nick Valentine tells it, an Institute Synth murdered every representative in the room, bringing this endeavor to a swift end. [[spoiler:Father tells it differently, claiming that the Synth was the only one left after all the other representatives killed each other. Old holotapes corroborate this narrative.]]
12th Jun '17 8:15:16 PM MaxBrain
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Added DiffLines:

* The Provisional Commonwealth Government in ''VideoGame/Fallout4'' was an early attempt to form a legislature in the post-war Commonwealth. The way Nick Valentine tells it, an Institute Synth murdered every representative in the room, bringing this endeavor to a swift end. [[spoiler:Father tells it differently, claiming that the Synth was the only one left after all the other representatives killed each other. Old holotapes corroborate this narrative.]]
30th May '17 1:43:05 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''ThreeHundred'': Queen Gorgo speaks to the Spartan ''gerousia'' (senate), hoping to convince them to send the full army to reinforce King Leonidas. Theron betrays her and mocks her fidelity for having slept with him. Gorgo's rebuttal is a sword to his rib, followed by a ruthless IronicEcho of the words he used against her during said tryst ([[ScarpiaUltimatum which was anything]] [[RapeAsDrama but consensual]]).
* There are a couple of small ones near the end of ''MrSmithGoesToWashington''.

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* ''ThreeHundred'': ''Film/ThreeHundred'': Queen Gorgo speaks to the Spartan ''gerousia'' (senate), hoping to convince them to send the full army to reinforce King Leonidas. Theron betrays her and mocks her fidelity for having slept with him. Gorgo's rebuttal is a sword to his rib, followed by a ruthless IronicEcho of the words he used against her during said tryst ([[ScarpiaUltimatum which was anything]] [[RapeAsDrama but consensual]]).
* There are a couple of small ones near the end of ''MrSmithGoesToWashington''.''Film/MrSmithGoesToWashington''.
15th Mar '17 6:37:32 AM Charbydis
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** A violation of Rule XIX (famously used by Jeff Sessions against Elizabeth Warren in 2017) essentially boils down to stopping a Senator who is Addressing the Senate from verbally attacking the motives of a fellow Senator and/or any state. Senator's who are seen as breaking it are no longer allowed to partake in the debate (they can still vote on the bill). The logic is meant to diffuse any situation where the verbal offense would give way to this trope (to prevent LoopholeAbuse, this includes quoting other people who speak ill of the aggrieved Senator.). It only applies on the Senate Floor, so there is nothing stopping the Senator who is [[StreisandEffect accused of doing such from going to the nearest reporter and repeating the attack on national Television, so using it to silence opposing party members is generally unwise.]] [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement Whether or not any such incident was justified is best discussed elsewhere.]] According to later media reporting, the rule dates to the antebellum dates alluded to above and was supposedly used to silence abolitionists. Make of that what you will.
3rd Mar '17 1:54:59 PM Jhonny
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* Perhaps the most Canadian version of this can be seen [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kp2trJBoUBA here]] when Justin Trudeau tries to intervene in a scuffle (caused by one party trying to physically block members of another party from getting where they want) and in the process hits a woman standing behind him with his elbow. Of course the video also contains him apologizing profusely.
3rd Mar '17 12:56:35 PM Xtifr
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* The most (in)famous occurrence of this: the assassination of Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar (the famous one) inside the Senate (actually Pompey's Theater, where the Senate was temporarily meeting) on March 15, 44 BC. The reason the conspirators chose to kill him there is that, by custom, only senators were allowed to enter the chamber, so Caesar couldn't bring bodyguards.

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* The most (in)famous occurrence of this: the assassination of Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar (the famous one) inside the Senate (actually Pompey's Theater, where the Senate was temporarily meeting) on March 15, 44 BC. The reason the conspirators chose to kill him there is that, by custom, only senators were allowed to enter the chamber, so Caesar couldn't bring bodyguards.
3rd Mar '17 12:55:55 PM Xtifr
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This sort of thing tends to occur in non-Anglophone legislatures and has provided material for satirical TV shows for years. More dramatic slants, especially in Western literature, often draw on the assassination of [[Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar Julius Caesar]] or [[Theatre/JuliusCaesar Shakespeare's famous dramatization]]. In the United States of America, this was surprisingly common prior to the Civil War and in its immediate aftermath, when slavery (and later the treatment of the recently freed slaves) aroused tempers in North and South.

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This sort of thing tends to occur in non-Anglophone legislatures and has provided material for satirical TV shows for years. More dramatic slants, especially in Western literature, often draw on the assassination of [[Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar Julius Caesar]] UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar or [[Theatre/JuliusCaesar Shakespeare's famous dramatization]]. In the United States of America, this was surprisingly common prior to the Civil War and in its immediate aftermath, when slavery (and later the treatment of the recently freed slaves) aroused tempers in North and South.
26th Feb '17 6:03:45 AM theNerdytimes
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This sort of thing tends to occur in non-Anglophone legislatures and has provided material for satirical TV shows for years. More dramatic slants, especially in Western literature, often draw on the assassination of [[Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar Julius Caesar]] or [[Theatre/JuliusCaesar Shakespeare's famous dramatization]]. In the United States of America, this was surprisingly common prior to the Civil War and in its immediate aftermath, when slavery (and later the treatment of the recently freed slaves) aroused tempers in North and South. The pagequote is one such example.

to:

This sort of thing tends to occur in non-Anglophone legislatures and has provided material for satirical TV shows for years. More dramatic slants, especially in Western literature, often draw on the assassination of [[Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar Julius Caesar]] or [[Theatre/JuliusCaesar Shakespeare's famous dramatization]]. In the United States of America, this was surprisingly common prior to the Civil War and in its immediate aftermath, when slavery (and later the treatment of the recently freed slaves) aroused tempers in North and South. The pagequote is one such example.
South.
22nd Feb '17 2:26:58 PM Jhonny
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** A violation of Rule XIX (famously used by Jeff Sessions against Elizabeth Warren in 2017) essentially boils down to stopping a Senator who is Addressing the Senate from verbally attacking the motives of a fellow Senator and/or any state. Senator's who are seen as breaking it are no longer allowed to partake in the debate (the can still vote on the bill). The logic is meant to diffuse any situation where the verbal offense would give way to this trope (to prevent LoopholeAbuse, this includes quoting other people who speak ill of the aggrieved Senator.). It only applies on the Senate Floor, so there is nothing stopping the Senator who is [[StreisandEffect accused of doing such from going to the nearest reporter and repeating the attack on national Television, so using it to silence opposing party members is generally unwise.]] [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement Whether or not any such incident was justified is best discussed elsewhere.]]

to:

** A violation of Rule XIX (famously used by Jeff Sessions against Elizabeth Warren in 2017) essentially boils down to stopping a Senator who is Addressing the Senate from verbally attacking the motives of a fellow Senator and/or any state. Senator's who are seen as breaking it are no longer allowed to partake in the debate (the (they can still vote on the bill). The logic is meant to diffuse any situation where the verbal offense would give way to this trope (to prevent LoopholeAbuse, this includes quoting other people who speak ill of the aggrieved Senator.). It only applies on the Senate Floor, so there is nothing stopping the Senator who is [[StreisandEffect accused of doing such from going to the nearest reporter and repeating the attack on national Television, so using it to silence opposing party members is generally unwise.]] [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement Whether or not any such incident was justified is best discussed elsewhere.]]]] According to later media reporting, the rule dates to the antebellum dates alluded to above and was supposedly used to silence abolitionists. Make of that what you will.
22nd Feb '17 12:46:02 PM hszmv1
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Added DiffLines:

** A violation of Rule XIX (famously used by Jeff Sessions against Elizabeth Warren in 2017) essentially boils down to stopping a Senator who is Addressing the Senate from verbally attacking the motives of a fellow Senator and/or any state. Senator's who are seen as breaking it are no longer allowed to partake in the debate (the can still vote on the bill). The logic is meant to diffuse any situation where the verbal offense would give way to this trope (to prevent LoopholeAbuse, this includes quoting other people who speak ill of the aggrieved Senator.). It only applies on the Senate Floor, so there is nothing stopping the Senator who is [[StreisandEffect accused of doing such from going to the nearest reporter and repeating the attack on national Television, so using it to silence opposing party members is generally unwise.]] [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement Whether or not any such incident was justified is best discussed elsewhere.]]
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