History Main / BannedInChina

24th Nov '16 7:21:17 PM RAMChYLD
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* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chewing_gum_ban_in_Singapore Possession of chewing gum and bubble gum is illegal in Singapore, with the exception of medicinal gum for therapeutic uses.]]
** Correction, possession of chewing/bubble gum ''is'' legal and people can chew in it Singapore, it's just purchasing of it and littering of it is illegal. Bringing it into the country is also legal. Singapore just has a very strict no-littering policy.

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* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chewing_gum_ban_in_Singapore Possession Sale and resale of chewing gum and bubble gum in Singapore is illegal in Singapore, with the exception of medicinal gum for therapeutic uses.]]
** Correction, possession of chewing/bubble gum ''is''
use.]] Possession however is legal and people can chew in it Singapore, chewing is allowed since it's just purchasing of it difficult to tell which gum is medicinal and which is not. However, do note that littering of it is illegal. Bringing it into the country is also legal. and vandalism in Singapore just has a carries very strict no-littering policy.
harsh penalties, especially where vandalism using chewing gum is concerned.
24th Nov '16 7:06:29 PM RAMChYLD
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* ''Film/{{Zoolander}}'' was banned in Singapore as a move of goodwill towards their neighbor Malaysia. Five years later, though, the two countries had a falling-out, and Singapore lifted the ban. The problem is that even after mending the relationship, Singapore can't just un-ban the movie.

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* ''Film/{{Zoolander}}'' was banned in Singapore as a move of goodwill towards their neighbor Malaysia. Five years later, though, the two countries had a falling-out, and Singapore lifted the ban. The problem is that even after mending the relationship, Singapore can't just un-ban re-ban the movie.
17th Nov '16 10:58:27 AM Lirodon
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* As of June 2013, Russia has a federal HeteronormativeCrusader law that bans the distribution of "propaganda of non-traditional sexual relationships" (read: LGBT) [[ThinkOfTheChildren among minors]].



* [[HeteronormativeCrusader The current Russian government]] blacklists Internet resources advocating drugs, suicide, and terrorism, ostensibly to [[ThinkOfTheChildren protect the children]]. It is quite often that the notice is served to Website/LiveJournal about a repost, while the original site goes by scot-free. What qualifies as advocating suicide? [[WebAnimation/DumbWaysToDie A PSA about railway safety.]]

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* [[HeteronormativeCrusader The current Russian government]] government blacklists Internet resources advocating drugs, suicide, and terrorism, ostensibly to [[ThinkOfTheChildren protect the children]]. It is quite often that the notice is served to Website/LiveJournal about a repost, while the original site goes by scot-free. What qualifies as advocating suicide? [[WebAnimation/DumbWaysToDie A PSA about railway safety.]]
* In 2016, [=LinkedIn=] was banned in Russia for violating a new data retention law.



* Two episodes of ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'', namely "The Answer" & "Hit the Diamond" are banned from airing in Russia and Bulgaria (since the Russian feed of Creator/CartoonNetwork is shared with Bulgaria) due to the heavy LGBT tones, and thanks to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_gay_propaganda_law a certain Russian law]], are never likely to be televised.

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* Two episodes of ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'', namely "The Answer" & "Hit the Diamond" are banned from airing in Russia and Bulgaria (since the Russian feed of Creator/CartoonNetwork is shared with Bulgaria) due to the heavy LGBT tones, and thanks to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_gay_propaganda_law a certain Russian law]], are never likely to be televised.
tones.
21st Oct '16 8:36:49 AM 64SuperNintendo
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[[AC:Literature]]
* ''Literature/LadyChatterleysLover'' was determined by the Supreme Court to be legally "obscene" in 1957, the case having originated in 1951. The Japanese translator and the publisher were both subjected to fines, and unexpurgated versions of the text could not be legally sold under Paragraph 175 of the Japanese Penal Code,[[note]]Not to be confused with the infamous Paragraph 175 of the German Penal Code, which banned homosexuality in that country. The coincidence of the number of two different paragraphs both dealing with crimes of a sexual nature is, in fact, due to the Japanese code having been based, in part, on the German code, but homosexuality has never been illegal under either of Japan's constitutions (though it was very briefly banned for a few years immediately after the opening of Japan to the West, before the passage of the Meiji Constitution).[[/note]] which bans the sale, publication, and exhibition (but not the possession) of obscene works. The Chatterley trial, indeed, originated the criteria Japanese courts use to judge whether or not a work is obscene. Versions of the novel sold in Japan from the 1950s through the 1990s had the offending parts replaced with asterisks. From the 1990s onward, uncensored versions of the novel began to be sold. Interestingly, on paper the relevant legislation has not changed, and there has not been a legal case that has officially overturned the 1957 ruling. Rather, prosecutors and the government have taken no action against publishers, resulting in a ''de facto'' but somewhat confusing change in Japan's obscenity laws.
* ''Literature/TheBellsOfNagasaki'', a non-fiction account of the atomic bombing of that city by a survivor, was initially refused publication under the censorship regime during the American occupation. It was eventually allowed to be published with an accurate but off-topic appendix about atrocities perpetrated by the Japanese tacked onto the end, presumably for "balance". Versions published after the end of the occupation, as well as English translations, generally omit the appendix.
* In 1999, Japan's customs authority banned the importation of a book of photographs by Creator/RobertMapplethorpe, despite it having previously been published in the country without incident. In 2008, the Supreme Court overturned the ban.
* Historian Saburo Ienaga holds the distinction of being the complainant in the longest civil trial in any country on record. In 1965, he sued the Japanese education ministry over its refusal to approve to his history book, which did not shy away from depicting war-time atrocities by the Japanese. Ienaga and his lawyers argued that the refusal to approve the book constituted censorship, though there was never any ban on the sale of the book, just on its use as an official textbook in schools. In 1997, the Supreme Court finally ruled that although no censorship had taken place, the ministry had nonetheless abused its discretion in not approving the book.



[[AC:Literature]]
* ''Literature/LadyChatterleysLover'' was determined by the Supreme Court to be legally "obscene" in 1957, the case having originated in 1951. The Japanese translator and the publisher were both subjected to fines, and unexpurgated versions of the text could not be legally sold under Paragraph 175 of the Japanese Penal Code,[[note]]Not to be confused with the infamous Paragraph 175 of the German Penal Code, which banned homosexuality in that country. The coincidence of the number of two different paragraphs both dealing with crimes of a sexual nature is, in fact, due to the Japanese code having been based, in part, on the German code, but homosexuality has never been illegal under either of Japan's constitutions (though it was very briefly banned for a few years immediately after the opening of Japan to the West, before the passage of the Meiji Constitution).[[/note]] which bans the sale, publication, and exhibition (but not the possession) of obscene works. The Chatterley trial, indeed, originated the criteria Japanese courts use to judge whether or not a work is obscene. Versions of the novel sold in Japan from the 1950s through the 1990s had the offending parts replaced with asterisks. From the 1990s onward, uncensored versions of the novel began to be sold. Interestingly, on paper the relevant legislation has not changed, and there has not been a legal case that has officially overturned the 1957 ruling. Rather, prosecutors and the government have taken no action against publishers, resulting in a ''de facto'' but somewhat confusing change in Japan's obscenity laws.
* ''Literature/TheBellsOfNagasaki'', a non-fiction account of the atomic bombing of that city by a survivor, was initially refused publication under the censorship regime during the American occupation. It was eventually allowed to be published with an accurate but off-topic appendix about atrocities perpetrated by the Japanese tacked onto the end, presumably for "balance". Versions published after the end of the occupation, as well as English translations, generally omit the appendix.
* In 1999, Japan's customs authority banned the importation of a book of photographs by Creator/RobertMapplethorpe, despite it having previously been published in the country without incident. In 2008, the Supreme Court overturned the ban.
* Historian Saburo Ienaga holds the distinction of being the complainant in the longest civil trial in any country on record. In 1965, he sued the Japanese education ministry over its refusal to approve to his history book, which did not shy away from depicting war-time atrocities by the Japanese. Ienaga and his lawyers argued that the refusal to approve the book constituted censorship, though there was never any ban on the sale of the book, just on its use as an official textbook in schools. In 1997, the Supreme Court finally ruled that although no censorship had taken place, the ministry had nonetheless abused its discretion in not approving the book.
19th Oct '16 9:04:29 PM QuanticCandy
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** Correction, possession of chewing/bubble gum ''is'' legal and people can chew in it Singapore, it's just purchasing of it and littering of it is illegal. Bringing it into the country is also legal. Singapore just has a very strict no-littering policy.
19th Oct '16 5:53:53 PM MarioAndSpongeBobFan
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Added DiffLines:


[[AC:Western Animation]]
*''WesternAnimation/CowAndChicken'' and ''WesternAnimation/BackAtTheBarnyard'' are both banned in the country due to their depiction of cows, which are seen as sacred creatures in Hindu religion.
18th Oct '16 10:22:25 AM IvanovTroping97
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* Two episodes of ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'', namely "The Answer" & "Hit the Diamond" are banned from airing in Russia and Bulgaria (since the Russian feed of Creator/CartoonNetwork is shared with Bulgaria) due to the heavy LGBT tones, and thanks to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_gay_propaganda_law a certain Russian law]], are never likely to be televised.
17th Oct '16 6:03:17 PM SnowLeopard84
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Webcomic/TheMeek'': According to the author's commentary [[http://www.meekcomic.com/comic/2-23/ here,]] the comic's website is banned; this is likely because of the nudity present in some chapters of the comic.
10th Oct '16 4:47:19 PM Wuz
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* ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare 2'' was released in Russia without its infamous optional airport level, "No Russia". In it, the player character participates in an mass slaughter of civilians in Sheremetyevo International Airport. Notably, while they can opt not to fire on the crowds, they cannot retaliate against the terrorists perpetrating it (getting a NonStandardGameOver) and are compelled to kill the responding FSB personnel accordingly. Due to the haphazard ratings review board in Russia, some versions of the game were sold featuring the level, though ultimately the Steam distribution did have it removed. In 2010 Russian MP Valery Seleznyov (LDPR) proposed that the game be added to the list of extremist materials held by the Federal Justice Ministry in Russia (ultimately it was not).

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* ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare 2'' was released in Russia without its infamous optional airport level, "No Russia". In it, the player character participates in an mass slaughter of civilians in Sheremetyevo International Airport.a Russian airport. Notably, while they can opt not to fire on the crowds, they cannot retaliate against the terrorists perpetrating it (getting a NonStandardGameOver) and are compelled to kill the responding FSB personnel accordingly. Due to the haphazard ratings review board in Russia, some versions of the game were sold featuring the level, though ultimately the Steam distribution did have it removed. In 2010 Russian MP Valery Seleznyov (LDPR) proposed that the game be added to the list of extremist materials held by the Federal Justice Ministry in Russia (ultimately it was not).
6th Oct '16 7:28:20 PM VictorDamazio
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* ''VideoGame/{{Bully}}'' has been banned because of its depictions of school violence. Amazingly, this one is actually enforced, as UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} will not sell the game (or any package that contains it) in Brazil.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Bully}}'' has been banned because of its depictions of school violence. Amazingly, this one is was actually enforced, as UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} will not didn't sell the game (or any package that contains it) in Brazil.Brazil, until in 2016, it came back.
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