History Main / AudienceAlienatingPremise

20th Mar '17 3:31:37 PM Mineboot45
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*** Learning from this mistake, LEGO began working together more closely with creative agencies and storytellers for their next line, ''Toys/{{Bionicle}}'', and turned what was originally conceptualized as a story of robot tribesmen beating each others' heads off into a more serious ScienceFantasy [[TheEpic epic]] that resonated well with its audience, and became one of their most popular series. Ironically, ''BIONICLE'' itself became an example in its later years because [[ContinuityLockout kids couldn't keep up with its over-thought continuity]], and after nine and a half years, LEGO had to cancel it. The later [[Toys/{{Bionicle2015}} reboot]] was significantly simplified.

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*** ** Learning from this mistake, LEGO began working together more closely with creative agencies and storytellers for their next line, ''Toys/{{Bionicle}}'', and turned what was originally conceptualized as a story of robot tribesmen beating each others' heads off into a more serious ScienceFantasy [[TheEpic epic]] that resonated well with its audience, and became one of their most popular series. Ironically, ''BIONICLE'' itself became an example in its later years because [[ContinuityLockout kids couldn't keep up with its over-thought continuity]], and after nine and a half years, LEGO had to cancel it. The later [[Toys/{{Bionicle2015}} reboot]] was significantly simplified.
20th Mar '17 3:31:13 PM Mineboot45
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** Learning from this mistake, LEGO began working together more closely with creative agencies and storytellers for their next line, ''Toys/{{Bionicle}}'', and turned what was originally conceptualized as a story of robot tribesmen beating each others' heads off into a more serious ScienceFantasy [[TheEpic epic]] that resonated well with its audience, and became one of their most popular series. Ironically, ''BIONICLE'' itself became an example in its later years because [[ContinuityLockout kids couldn't keep up with its over-thought continuity]], and after nine and a half years, LEGO had to cancel it. The later [[Toys/{{Bionicle2015}} reboot]] was significantly simplified.

to:

** *** Learning from this mistake, LEGO began working together more closely with creative agencies and storytellers for their next line, ''Toys/{{Bionicle}}'', and turned what was originally conceptualized as a story of robot tribesmen beating each others' heads off into a more serious ScienceFantasy [[TheEpic epic]] that resonated well with its audience, and became one of their most popular series. Ironically, ''BIONICLE'' itself became an example in its later years because [[ContinuityLockout kids couldn't keep up with its over-thought continuity]], and after nine and a half years, LEGO had to cancel it. The later [[Toys/{{Bionicle2015}} reboot]] was significantly simplified.
19th Mar '17 3:16:14 PM Mineboot45
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* The Mexican animated film ''WesternAnimation/UnGalloConMuchosHuevos'' seems at first glance to be just an average film that'd be reasonably respectable in its home country. Its wide US release, however, is mind-boggling. Here we have a CGI film starring talking animals that resembles a kid pic but got a PG-13 rating for its US release, likely due to cultural differences in that Mexican humor is a bit more relaxed with standards than US humor. On top of that, the film is not being dubbed for its American release, it will be Spanish with English subtitles. How likely is it anyone will want to see a kiddie-looking PG-13 animated flick in Spanish? ([[SleeperHit and yet it cracked the weekend top 10,]] [[https://www.thewrap.com/mexicos-un-gallo-con-muchos-huevos-hits-bulls-eye-at-box-office/ playing in less than 400 theaters]]...)

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* The Mexican animated film ''WesternAnimation/UnGalloConMuchosHuevos'' ''Un Gallo Con Muchos Huevos'' seems at first glance to be just an average film that'd be reasonably respectable in its home country. Its wide US release, however, is mind-boggling. Here we have a CGI film starring talking animals that resembles a kid pic but got a PG-13 rating for its US release, likely due to cultural differences in that Mexican humor is a bit more relaxed with standards than US humor. On top of that, the film is not being dubbed for its American release, it will be Spanish with English subtitles. How likely is it anyone will want to see a kiddie-looking PG-13 animated flick in Spanish? ([[SleeperHit and yet it cracked the weekend top 10,]] [[https://www.thewrap.com/mexicos-un-gallo-con-muchos-huevos-hits-bulls-eye-at-box-office/ playing in less than 400 theaters]]...)
19th Mar '17 2:42:57 PM Mineboot45
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* ''Fanfic/TheConversionBureau'' is about [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic the ponies]] basically [[WouldBeRudeToSayGenocide forcing all of humanity ]]to [[AssimilationPlot convert into ponies]] [[SadisticChoice or get killed by the lethal magic]] coming out of Equestria. And most of the time, this is treated as a good thing. It's pretty easy to see why this story and many of its [[RecursiveFanfiction fan written spin-offs]] are so polarizing.

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* ''Fanfic/TheConversionBureau'' is about [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic the ponies]] basically [[WouldBeRudeToSayGenocide forcing all of humanity ]]to humanity]] to [[AssimilationPlot convert into ponies]] [[SadisticChoice or get killed by the lethal magic]] coming out of Equestria. And most of the time, this is treated as a good thing. It's pretty easy to see why this story and many of its [[RecursiveFanfiction fan written spin-offs]] are so polarizing.
19th Mar '17 12:24:48 PM comicwriter
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** The game was far more complex and strategic than ''Street Fighter II'' or any of the ''Alpha'' games, turning off new players. It later found [[VindicatedByHistory success among tournament players]] and FightingGameCommunity, but to this day, has a reputation for being very unfriendly to newbies or casual gamers.

to:

** The game was far more complex and strategic than ''Street Fighter II'' or any of the ''Alpha'' games, turning off new players. It later found [[VindicatedByHistory success among tournament players]] and in FightingGameCommunity, but to this day, it still has a reputation for being very unfriendly to newbies or casual gamers.
19th Mar '17 12:24:02 PM comicwriter
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** The game was far more complex and strategic than ''Street Fighter II'' or any of the ''Alpha'' games, turning off new players. It later found [[VindicatedByHistory serious success among tournament players]], but to this day, has a reputation for being very unfriendly to newbies or casual gamers.
** The game was developed for Capcom's brand new CPS-3 arcade cabinet. This allowed for far more detailed, fluid sprites than in the CPS-2 fighting games like the ''Alpha'' series, but consequently made ''III'' far more expensive for arcade operators. This, coupled with the declining popularity of 2D fighting games and arcades in general, meant that many operators passed on ordering the game. The advanced graphics also meant that ''III'' couldn't be ported to most of the then-current home consoles without sacrificing features or animations, as had happened with ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter'' the previous year. It didn't get a home release until two years later, and even then, only for Sega's [[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]] system. While the ''Alpha'' games and ''VideoGame/StreetFighterEX'' had sold well on home consoles, Capcom couldn't repeat that same success when ''III'' was only available on the Dreamcast, a system that had never been as successful as the [=PlayStation=].
''III'' eventually saw a [[UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 2}} PS2 release]] in 2004, ''seven years'' later.

to:

** The game was far more complex and strategic than ''Street Fighter II'' or any of the ''Alpha'' games, turning off new players. It later found [[VindicatedByHistory serious success among tournament players]], players]] and FightingGameCommunity, but to this day, has a reputation for being very unfriendly to newbies or casual gamers.
** The game was developed for Capcom's brand new CPS-3 arcade cabinet. This allowed for far more detailed, fluid sprites than in the CPS-2 fighting games like the ''Alpha'' series, but consequently made ''III'' far more expensive for arcade operators. This, coupled with the declining popularity of 2D fighting games and arcades in general, meant that many operators passed on ordering the game. The advanced graphics also meant that ''III'' couldn't be ported to most of the then-current home consoles without sacrificing features or animations, as had happened with ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter'' the previous year. It didn't get a home release until two years later, and even then, only for Sega's [[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]] system. While the ''Alpha'' games and ''VideoGame/StreetFighterEX'' had sold well on home consoles, Capcom couldn't repeat that same success when ''III'' was only available on the Dreamcast, a system that had never been as successful as the [=PlayStation=].
[=PlayStation=]. ''III'' eventually saw a [[UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 2}} PS2 release]] in 2004, ''seven years'' later.
19th Mar '17 12:22:22 PM comicwriter
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** The game was developed for Capcom's brand new CPS-3 arcade cabinet. This allowed for far more detailed, fluid sprites than in the CPS-2 fighting games like the ''Alpha'' series, but consequently made ''III'' far more expensive for arcade operators. This, coupled with the declining popularity of 2D fighting games and arcades in general, meant that many operators passed on ordering the game. The advanced graphics also meant that ''III'' couldn't be ported to most of the then-current home consoles without sacrificing features or animations, as had happened with ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter'' the previous year. The ''Alpha'' games and ''VideoGame/StreetFighterEX'' had sold well on home consoles, but Capcom couldn't repeat that same success when ''III'' was only available on Dreamcast, a system that had never been as successful as the [=PlayStation=]. It didn't get a home release until two years later, and even then, only for Sega's ailing [[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]] system. ''III'' eventually saw a [[UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 2}} PS2 release]] in 2004, ''seven years'' later.

to:

** The game was developed for Capcom's brand new CPS-3 arcade cabinet. This allowed for far more detailed, fluid sprites than in the CPS-2 fighting games like the ''Alpha'' series, but consequently made ''III'' far more expensive for arcade operators. This, coupled with the declining popularity of 2D fighting games and arcades in general, meant that many operators passed on ordering the game. The advanced graphics also meant that ''III'' couldn't be ported to most of the then-current home consoles without sacrificing features or animations, as had happened with ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter'' the previous year. The It didn't get a home release until two years later, and even then, only for Sega's [[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]] system. While the ''Alpha'' games and ''VideoGame/StreetFighterEX'' had sold well on home consoles, but Capcom couldn't repeat that same success when ''III'' was only available on the Dreamcast, a system that had never been as successful as the [=PlayStation=]. It didn't get a home release until two years later, and even then, only for Sega's ailing [[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]] system. [=PlayStation=].
''III'' eventually saw a [[UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 2}} PS2 release]] in 2004, ''seven years'' later.later.
19th Mar '17 12:18:36 PM comicwriter
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** Most famously, Creator/{{Capcom}} opted to replace almost the entire cast from the previous games with a new roster of fighters, with Ryu and Ken being the lone holdovers. They were likely trying to replicate the near-complete cast changeover from ''VideoGame/StreetFighterI'' to ''II'' and hoping for similar success, without realizing how different the circumstances were. The first ''Street Fighter'' was a cult hit, meaning nobody really cared when most of its characters were left out of the sequel. ''Street Fighter II'' on the other hand had proven to be a huge, global hit, with the new fighters becoming household names and subsequently appearing in the ''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha'' prequel series, as well as the various [[Film/StreetFighter mov]][[Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie ie]] and [[WesternAnimation/StreetFighter T]][[Anime/StreetFighterII V]] adaptations. This meant audiences were far more attached to these characters than the ones from the original game, and their absence in ''Street Fighter III'' incited far more backlash than expected.

to:

** Most famously, Creator/{{Capcom}} opted to replace almost the entire cast from the previous games with a new roster of fighters, with Ryu and Ken being the lone holdovers. They were likely trying to replicate the near-complete cast changeover from ''VideoGame/StreetFighterI'' to ''II'' and hoping for similar success, without realizing how different the circumstances were. The first ''Street Fighter'' was a cult hit, meaning nobody really cared when most of its characters were left out of the sequel. ''Street Fighter II'' on the other hand had proven to be a huge, global hit, sensation, with the new fighters becoming household names overnight and subsequently appearing in the ''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha'' prequel series, as well as the various [[Film/StreetFighter mov]][[Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie ie]] and [[WesternAnimation/StreetFighter T]][[Anime/StreetFighterII V]] adaptations. This meant audiences were far more attached to these characters than the ones from the original game, and their absence in ''Street Fighter III'' incited far more backlash than expected.
19th Mar '17 11:59:41 AM comicwriter
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** Most famously, Creator/{{Capcom}} opted to replace almost the entire cast from the previous games with a new roster of fighters, with Ryu and Ken being the lone holdovers. They were likely trying to replicate the near-complete cast changeover from ''VideoGame/StreetFighterI'' to ''II'' and hoping for similar success, without taking into account the difference in the situations. The first ''Street Fighter'' was a cult hit, meaning nobody really cared when most of its characters were left out of the sequel. ''Street Fighter II'' on the other hand had proven to be a huge, global hit, with the new fighters becoming household names and subsequently appearing in the ''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha'' prequel series, as well as the various [[Film/StreetFighter mov]][[Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie ie]] and [[WesternAnimation/StreetFighter T]][[Anime/StreetFighterII V]] adaptations. This meant audiences were far more attached to these characters than the ones from the original game, meaning that their absence in ''Street Fighter III'' incited far more backlash than expected.
** The game was released in 1997, right as American arcades were dying ''and'' while 3D fighting games like ''VideGame/VirtuaFighter'' and ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'' were becoming extremely popular. Despite ''Street Fighter III'' having cutting edge, beautifully-animated hand drawn sprites for the time, many casual gamers dismissed it as looking cheap or outdated.
** The game was far more complex and strategic than ''Street Fighter II'' or any of the ''Alpha'' games, turning off new players. It later found [[VindicatedByHistory serious success among tournament players]], but to this day, has a reputation for being very unfriendly to casual players.
** The game was developed for Capcom's brand new CPS-3 arcade cabinet. This allowed for far more detailed, fluid sprites than in the CPS-2 fighting games like the ''Alpha'' series, but consequently made ''III'' far more expensive for arcade operators. This, coupled with the declining popularity of 2D fighting games and arcades in general, meant that many operators passed on ordering the game. The advanced graphics also meant that ''III'' couldn't be ported to most of the then-current home consoles without sacrificing features or animations, as had happened with ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter'' the previous year. It didn't get a home release until two years later, and even then, only for Sega's ailing [[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]] system. ''III'' eventually saw a [[UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 2}} PS2 release]] in 2004, ''seven years'' later.
** In the end, Capcom released a third ''Alpha'' game the following year, which brought back even more of the characters from ''Street Fighter II'' (namely Cammy, Balrog, Vega and E. Honda) in an effort to WinBackTheCrowd. While the CPS-2 hardware meant that the graphics in ''Alpha 3'' didn't look as good as the ones in ''III'', it also made the game much cheaper for arcade owners and allowed it to be released for the UsefulNotes/{{Playstation}}, where it sold a million copies. The CPS-3 ended up dead in the water, and Capcom's future 2D fighting games like the ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom'' and ''VideoGame/SNKVsCapcom'' series ended up either utilizing the CPS-2 or different cabinets like Sega's NAOMI hardware. Those games also made sure to mostly feature Capcom characters from ''Street Fighter II'' and the ''Alpha'' trilogy in order to avoid alienating fans in the same way they'd done with ''III''.

to:

** Most famously, Creator/{{Capcom}} opted to replace almost the entire cast from the previous games with a new roster of fighters, with Ryu and Ken being the lone holdovers. They were likely trying to replicate the near-complete cast changeover from ''VideoGame/StreetFighterI'' to ''II'' and hoping for similar success, without taking into account realizing how different the difference in the situations.circumstances were. The first ''Street Fighter'' was a cult hit, meaning nobody really cared when most of its characters were left out of the sequel. ''Street Fighter II'' on the other hand had proven to be a huge, global hit, with the new fighters becoming household names and subsequently appearing in the ''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha'' prequel series, as well as the various [[Film/StreetFighter mov]][[Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie ie]] and [[WesternAnimation/StreetFighter T]][[Anime/StreetFighterII V]] adaptations. This meant audiences were far more attached to these characters than the ones from the original game, meaning that and their absence in ''Street Fighter III'' incited far more backlash than expected.
** The game was released in 1997, right as American arcades were dying ''and'' while when 3D fighting games like ''VideGame/VirtuaFighter'' and ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'' were becoming extremely popular. Despite ''Street Fighter III'' having cutting edge, beautifully-animated hand drawn sprites for the time, many casual gamers dismissed it as looking cheap or outdated.
** The game was far more complex and strategic than ''Street Fighter II'' or any of the ''Alpha'' games, turning off new players. It later found [[VindicatedByHistory serious success among tournament players]], but to this day, has a reputation for being very unfriendly to newbies or casual players.
gamers.
** The game was developed for Capcom's brand new CPS-3 arcade cabinet. This allowed for far more detailed, fluid sprites than in the CPS-2 fighting games like the ''Alpha'' series, but consequently made ''III'' far more expensive for arcade operators. This, coupled with the declining popularity of 2D fighting games and arcades in general, meant that many operators passed on ordering the game. The advanced graphics also meant that ''III'' couldn't be ported to most of the then-current home consoles without sacrificing features or animations, as had happened with ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter'' the previous year. The ''Alpha'' games and ''VideoGame/StreetFighterEX'' had sold well on home consoles, but Capcom couldn't repeat that same success when ''III'' was only available on Dreamcast, a system that had never been as successful as the [=PlayStation=]. It didn't get a home release until two years later, and even then, only for Sega's ailing [[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]] system. ''III'' eventually saw a [[UsefulNotes/{{Playstation 2}} PS2 release]] in 2004, ''seven years'' later.
** In the end, Capcom released a third ''Alpha'' game the following year, which brought back even more of the characters from ''Street Fighter II'' (namely Cammy, Balrog, Vega and E. Honda) in an effort to WinBackTheCrowd. While the CPS-2 hardware meant that the graphics in ''Alpha 3'' didn't look as good as the ones in ''III'', it also made the game much cheaper for arcade owners and allowed it to be released for the UsefulNotes/{{Playstation}}, where it sold a million copies. The CPS-3 ended up dead in the water, and Capcom's future 2D fighting games like the ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom'' and ''VideoGame/SNKVsCapcom'' series ended wound up either utilizing the CPS-2 or different cabinets system boards like Sega's NAOMI hardware. Those games also made sure to mostly feature Capcom characters from ''Street Fighter II'' and the ''Alpha'' trilogy in order to avoid alienating fans in the same way they'd done with ''III''.
19th Mar '17 9:50:14 AM comicwriter
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** First, Creator/{{Capcom}} opted to replace almost the entire cast from the previous games and replace them with a mostly new roster of fighters, with Ryu and Ken being the lone holdovers. They were likely trying to replicate the near-complete cast changeover from ''VideoGame/StreetFighterI'' to ''II'' and hoping for similar success, without taking into account the difference in the situations. The first ''Street Fighter'' was a minor cult hit that not many people played, meaning nobody really cared when most of its characters were left out of the sequel. ''Street Fighter II'' on the other hand had proven to be a huge, global hit, with the new fighters becoming household names and subsequently appearing in the ''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha'' prequel series, as well as the various [[Film/StreetFighter mov]][[Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie ie]] and [[WesternAnimation/StreetFighter T]][[Anime/StreetFighterII V]] adaptations. This meant audiences were far more attached to these characters than the ones from the original game, meaning that their absence in ''Street Fighter III'' incited far more backlash than expected.

to:

** First, Most famously, Creator/{{Capcom}} opted to replace almost the entire cast from the previous games and replace them with a mostly new roster of fighters, with Ryu and Ken being the lone holdovers. They were likely trying to replicate the near-complete cast changeover from ''VideoGame/StreetFighterI'' to ''II'' and hoping for similar success, without taking into account the difference in the situations. The first ''Street Fighter'' was a minor cult hit that not many people played, hit, meaning nobody really cared when most of its characters were left out of the sequel. ''Street Fighter II'' on the other hand had proven to be a huge, global hit, with the new fighters becoming household names and subsequently appearing in the ''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha'' prequel series, as well as the various [[Film/StreetFighter mov]][[Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie ie]] and [[WesternAnimation/StreetFighter T]][[Anime/StreetFighterII V]] adaptations. This meant audiences were far more attached to these characters than the ones from the original game, meaning that their absence in ''Street Fighter III'' incited far more backlash than expected.
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