History Main / AsteroidThicket

2nd Aug '16 3:47:14 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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** The Eridanus asteroid belt, depicted in ''[[Literature/HaloTheFallOfReach The Fall of Reach]]'' and ''[[Literature/HaloFirstStrike First Strike]]'', is also another aversion. Although ''The Fall of Reach'' comic adaptation strangely depicts the smaller asteroids around Eridanus Secundus (an asteroid within the belt that is colonized by the [[LaResistance United Rebel Front]]) being unrealistically close to each other.

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** The Eridanus asteroid belt, depicted in ''[[Literature/HaloTheFallOfReach The Fall of Reach]]'' and ''[[Literature/HaloFirstStrike First Strike]]'', is also another aversion. Although aversion, although ''The Fall of Reach'' Reach''[='s=] comic adaptation strangely depicts the smaller asteroids around Eridanus Secundus (an asteroid within the belt that is colonized by the [[LaResistance United Rebel Front]]) being unrealistically close to each other.
2nd Aug '16 3:45:38 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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** A straight example is actually justified in Creator/TobiasBuckell's ''[[Literature/HaloTheColeProtocol The Cole Protocol]]''. The Rubble is explicitly said to be very unusual, the asteroids having been artificially tethered together, with the whole thing being kept stable by constant [=AI=]-controlled adjustments. Additionally, the asteroids are Trojan asteroids orbiting a gas giant, and each individual asteroid is relatively small. Then-Lieutenant Jacob Keyes even lampshades this, noting that this trope is what civilians, or "dirt siders", think of when they think of asteroid belts; when he first sees the Rubble, he can't initially accept what he's seeing, because it isn't scientifically accurate, as he notes asteroids can be millions of miles apart from each other.

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** A straight example is actually justified in Creator/TobiasBuckell's ''[[Literature/HaloTheColeProtocol The Cole Protocol]]''. The Rubble is explicitly said to be very unusual, the asteroids having been artificially tethered together, with the whole thing being kept stable by constant [=AI=]-controlled adjustments. Additionally, the asteroids are Trojan asteroids orbiting a gas giant, and each individual asteroid is relatively small. Then-Lieutenant Jacob Keyes even lampshades this, noting that this trope is what civilians, or "dirt siders", think of when they think of asteroid belts; when he first sees the Rubble, he initially can't initially accept what he's seeing, that it's real, because it isn't scientifically accurate, as he notes what happens in nature, with him explicitly noting that asteroids can be millions of miles apart from each other.
2nd Aug '16 3:42:20 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* Justified in Creator/TobiasBuckell's ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' novel ''[[Literature/HaloTheColeProtocol The Cole Protocol]]''. The Rubble is explicitly said to be very unusual, the asteroids having been tethered together, and is kept stable by constant adjustments controlled by an AI.
** Further justified because the asteroids are Trojan asteroids orbiting a gas giant, and each individual asteroid is relatively small.
*** In another lampshade of this trope, when then-Lieutenant Jacob Keyes notes that this is what civilians, or "dirt siders", think of Asteroid Thicket when they think of asteroid belts. When he first sees the Rubble, he can't initially accept what he's seeing, because it isn't scientifically accurate, as he notes asteroids can be millions of miles apart from each other. .
** The ''Halo'' franchise is actually pretty good with asteroid belts as a whole, other than the example in ''Halo: Reach'' seen below. The Kig-Yar home system, Y'Deio, is home to a massive asteroid belt that is stated to be abnormally dense (though not to the extent of most examples of this trope, as it has been stated in ''Mortal Dictata'' that it actually takes a realistic amount of time to travel between asteroids even with Kig-Yar and Covenant starships). In RealLife, the Y'Deio system is actually a real system, with a different name of course. The system's asteroid belt is notable for being unusually massive and dense, further justifying this example.
** The Eridanus asteroid belt, depicted in ''The Fall of Reach'' and ''First Strike'', is also another aversion to this trope. Although ''The Fall of Reach'' comic strangely depicts smaller asteroids around Eridanus Secundus (an asteroid within the asteroid belt that is colonized by the [[LaResistance United Rebel Front]]) unrealistically close to each other.

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* Justified in Creator/TobiasBuckell's The ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' novel ExpandedUniverse is actually quite good at treating asteroid belts realistically:
** A straight example is actually justified in Creator/TobiasBuckell's
''[[Literature/HaloTheColeProtocol The Cole Protocol]]''. The Rubble is explicitly said to be very unusual, the asteroids having been artificially tethered together, and is with the whole thing being kept stable by constant adjustments controlled by an AI.
** Further justified because
[=AI=]-controlled adjustments. Additionally, the asteroids are Trojan asteroids orbiting a gas giant, and each individual asteroid is relatively small.
*** In another lampshade of this trope, when then-Lieutenant
small. Then-Lieutenant Jacob Keyes notes even lampshades this, noting that this trope is what civilians, or "dirt siders", think of Asteroid Thicket when they think of asteroid belts. When belts; when he first sees the Rubble, he can't initially accept what he's seeing, because it isn't scientifically accurate, as he notes asteroids can be millions of miles apart from each other. .other.
** The ''Halo'' franchise is actually pretty good with asteroid belts as a whole, other than the example in ''Halo: Reach'' seen below. The Kig-Yar (aka Jackals/Skirmishers) home system, Y'Deio, is home to a massive asteroid belt that is stated to be abnormally dense (though not to the extent of most examples of this trope, as it has been stated it's noted in ''Mortal Dictata'' ''[[Literature/HaloMortalDictata Mortal Dictata]]'' that it actually still takes a realistic good amount of time to travel between asteroids even with Kig-Yar and Covenant starships). In RealLife, the Y'Deio system is actually a real system, with system (with a different name of course. The system's course), and its asteroid belt is notable for being unusually massive and dense, further justifying this example.
** The Eridanus asteroid belt, depicted in ''The ''[[Literature/HaloTheFallOfReach The Fall of Reach'' Reach]]'' and ''First Strike'', ''[[Literature/HaloFirstStrike First Strike]]'', is also another aversion to this trope. aversion. Although ''The Fall of Reach'' comic adaptation strangely depicts the smaller asteroids around Eridanus Secundus (an asteroid within the asteroid belt that is colonized by the [[LaResistance United Rebel Front]]) being unrealistically close to each other.
2nd Aug '16 9:57:41 AM Theriocephalus
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Conversely, planetary rings are (relatively) much more sparse in fiction than real life -- dense. Voyager 2 flew through Saturn's G ring -- one of the fainter rings -- once, at an angle, and there was [[http://spaceflightnow.com/cassini/040612soi.html "lots of evidence of micrometeroid hits"]] on the quite small 4-meter diameter probe, and the Cassini spacecraft has used its antenna as shield when crossing the same ring during their mission at Saturn. The thickness of the rings is also surprisingly variable, ranging from under 10 meters to over a kilometer. However, aspiring SF writers should know that these planetary ring systems are mostly made up of ice (99% of the rings' content) and rocks 0.01 to 10 meters across.

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Conversely, planetary rings are (relatively) much more sparse in fiction than they are in real life -- dense.life. Voyager 2 flew through Saturn's G ring -- one of the fainter rings -- once, at an angle, and there was [[http://spaceflightnow.com/cassini/040612soi.html "lots of evidence of micrometeroid hits"]] on the quite small 4-meter diameter probe, and the Cassini spacecraft has used its antenna as shield when crossing the same ring during their mission at Saturn. The thickness of the rings is also surprisingly variable, ranging from under 10 meters to over a kilometer. However, aspiring SF writers should know that these planetary ring systems are mostly made up of ice (99% of the rings' content) and rocks 0.01 to 10 meters across.
2nd Aug '16 9:56:39 AM Theriocephalus
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It's unfortunate that RealLife asteroid fields, while they do exist, don't have such a flair for the dramatic. RealLife asteroids are strewn much farther apart from each other; ''so'' far that the chance of even ''seeing'' one (let alone crashing into one) is pretty much nil. This is because a truly violent asteroid thicket, in RealLife, would simply dash itself to bits in a short period of time. Also, due to gravity, even dust will be attracted to itself; close rocks will probably merge, rather than crash together. Scientists have sent space probes through our solar system's main asteroid belt for decades, and haven't lost a single one in the process. While obviously no first-hand data is available about asteroid fields in other star systems, everything we know about physics tells us that they'd probably differ little from the ones in our own solar system and would be nothing like typical sci-fi depictions.

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It's unfortunate that RealLife asteroid fields, while they do exist, don't have such a flair for the dramatic. RealLife asteroids are strewn much farther apart from each other; ''so'' far that the chance of even ''seeing'' one (let alone crashing into one) is pretty much nil. This is because a truly violent asteroid thicket, in RealLife, would simply dash itself to bits in a short period of time. Also, due to gravity, even dust will be attracted to itself; larger rocks would gravitate towards each other even faster, and the whole asteroid field would eventually gather into a few fairly solid clusters -- in fact, this is fairly close rocks will probably merge, rather than crash together.to the going theory of how planets form from clouds of dust and rocks. Scientists have sent space probes through our solar system's main asteroid belt for decades, and haven't lost a single one in the process. While obviously no first-hand data is available about asteroid fields in other star systems, everything we know about physics tells us that they'd probably differ little from the ones in our own solar system and would be nothing like typical sci-fi depictions.
30th Jul '16 12:46:37 PM nombretomado
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* Justified and lampshaded in ''[[Literature/{{Starfire}} Crusade]]'' by DavidWeber. It first comes up in the context of a closed warp point (a [[OurWormholesAreDifferent warp point]] without a significant/detectable gravity field) that happens to exist in the middle of an asteroid belt, which led to the immediate destruction of small ships transiting due to collisions - a situation immediately stated as freakish and unique. One chapter later, an enemy uses an asteroid cluster in a different star system [[StealthInSpace to hide a fleet]], while musing that only in a handful of clusters do [[TakeThat/{{Literature}} "conditions even approach those... in popular entertainment."]]

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* Justified and lampshaded in ''[[Literature/{{Starfire}} Crusade]]'' by DavidWeber.Creator/DavidWeber. It first comes up in the context of a closed warp point (a [[OurWormholesAreDifferent warp point]] without a significant/detectable gravity field) that happens to exist in the middle of an asteroid belt, which led to the immediate destruction of small ships transiting due to collisions - a situation immediately stated as freakish and unique. One chapter later, an enemy uses an asteroid cluster in a different star system [[StealthInSpace to hide a fleet]], while musing that only in a handful of clusters do [[TakeThat/{{Literature}} "conditions even approach those... in popular entertainment."]]



** In TimothyZahn's ''[[Literature/HandOfThrawn Vision of the Future]]'', when the ''Wild Karrde'' goes through an asteroid field, Karrde notes that it's more dense than most his crew has encountered, as they have to shoot down asteroids more or less constantly. Zahn, as a general rule, knows quite well how space works and writes accordingly. But Asteroid Thickets are the one thing that showed up in Star Wars and could not be explained or {{handwave}}d, so he uses them like anyone else.

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** In TimothyZahn's Creator/TimothyZahn's ''[[Literature/HandOfThrawn Vision of the Future]]'', when the ''Wild Karrde'' goes through an asteroid field, Karrde notes that it's more dense than most his crew has encountered, as they have to shoot down asteroids more or less constantly. Zahn, as a general rule, knows quite well how space works and writes accordingly. But Asteroid Thickets are the one thing that showed up in Star Wars and could not be explained or {{handwave}}d, so he uses them like anyone else.
27th Jul '16 6:33:35 AM Morgenthaler
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* Averted/lampshaded in the ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' [[FamilyGuyPresentsLaughItUpFuzzball adaptation]] of TheEmpireStrikesBack when Threepio (played by Quagmire) says in the asteroid scene "Sir, the odds of successfully navigating an asteroid field are 2-1!". To which Han (portrayed by Peter) replies "Never tell me the o-oh... well that's not bad. Never mind, let's keep going."

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* Averted/lampshaded in the ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' [[FamilyGuyPresentsLaughItUpFuzzball [[WesternAnimation/FamilyGuyPresentsLaughItUpFuzzball adaptation]] of TheEmpireStrikesBack Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack when Threepio (played by Quagmire) says in the asteroid scene "Sir, the odds of successfully navigating an asteroid field are 2-1!". To which Han (portrayed by Peter) replies "Never tell me the o-oh... well that's not bad. Never mind, let's keep going."
23rd Jul '16 8:46:10 PM eowynjedi
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*** In a 7th season ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' episode, Odo tries to hide from some Jem'Hadar by flying into a dense Kuiper Belt, which aside from trading comets for asteroids, is still a classic Asteroid Thicket.

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*** ** In a 7th season ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' episode, Odo tries to hide from some Jem'Hadar by flying into a dense Kuiper Belt, which aside from trading comets for asteroids, is still a classic Asteroid Thicket.


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* ''Series/CosmosASpacetimeOdyssey'' depicts the Asteroid Belt as much denser than it really is when Neil flies the Ship of the Imagination through it. In a [=StarTalk=] episode, he admits to the ArtisticLicense taken because it quickly conveys where he is in the solar system and does point out (as said in the summary here) that no probe could have gone past Mars if the belt was really that hard to navigate. The depiction of the Oort Cloud is much more realistic.
25th Jun '16 11:09:29 AM nombretomado
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* [[InvokedTrope Invoked]] in the AHDotComTheSeries episode ''The Machine'', in which Captain Dr. What (whose knowledge of how the universe works is mainly based on old movies) tries to hide from [[LawyerFriendlyCameo the]] ''[[TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}} Vendetta]]'' in an asteroid belt, and the most knowledgeable GBW keeps trying to point out that the asteroids are too dispersed for this to work.

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* [[InvokedTrope Invoked]] in the AHDotComTheSeries ''Script/AHDotComTheSeries'' episode ''The Machine'', "The Machine", in which Captain Dr. What (whose knowledge of how the universe works is mainly based on old movies) tries to hide from [[LawyerFriendlyCameo the]] ''[[TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}} Vendetta]]'' in an asteroid belt, and the most knowledgeable GBW keeps trying to point out that the asteroids are too dispersed for this to work.
20th Jun '16 5:00:33 PM DopperPines
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* ''WesternAnimation/InvaderZim'' had this in one episode. Zim piloted a ship into the asteroid belt during a dogfight with Dib and it was destroyed by the asteroids. They were, respectively, piloting ''Mars and Mercury.''

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* ''WesternAnimation/InvaderZim'' had this in one episode. Zim piloted a ship into the asteroid belt during a dogfight with Dib and it was destroyed by the asteroids. They were, respectively, piloting ''Mars and Mercury.''''[[note]]Somewhat of a JustifiedTrope due to the fact that these planets are quite large compared to the asteroids distances from each other.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AsteroidThicket