History Main / AsteroidThicket

25th Apr '18 5:44:53 AM jormis29
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* Another old arcade game, ''Xain D'Sleena'', had an asteroid thicket at the beginning of the third stage in space. You can destroy them for extra points while dodging them, but being careful with the nasty SpaceMines scattered among them.

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* Another old arcade game, ''Xain D'Sleena'', ''VideoGame/XaindSleena'', had an asteroid thicket at the beginning of the third stage in space. You can destroy them for extra points while dodging them, but being careful with the nasty SpaceMines scattered among them.
18th Apr '18 3:10:24 PM Smeagol17
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Conversely, planetary rings are (relatively) much more sparse in fiction than they are in real life. Voyager 2 flew through Saturn's G ring -- one of the fainter rings -- once, at an angle, and there was [[http://spaceflightnow.com/cassini/040612soi.html "lots of evidence of micrometeroid hits"]] on the quite small 4-meter diameter probe, and the Cassini spacecraft used its antenna as shield when crossing the same ring or the space between thr rings and the planet during its mission at Saturn. The thickness of the rings is also surprisingly variable, ranging from under 10 meters to over a kilometer. However, aspiring SF writers should know that these planetary ring systems are mostly made up of ice (99% of the rings' content) and rocks 0.01 to 10 meters across.

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Conversely, planetary rings are (relatively) much more sparse in fiction than they are in real life. Voyager 2 flew through Saturn's G ring -- one of the fainter rings -- once, at an angle, and there was [[http://spaceflightnow.com/cassini/040612soi.html "lots of evidence of micrometeroid hits"]] on the quite small 4-meter diameter probe, and the Cassini spacecraft used its antenna as shield when crossing the same ring or the space between thr the rings and the planet during its mission at Saturn. The thickness of the rings is also surprisingly variable, ranging from under 10 meters to over a kilometer. However, aspiring SF writers should know that these planetary ring systems are mostly made up of ice (99% of the rings' content) and rocks 0.01 to 10 meters across.
29th Mar '18 8:54:30 PM nombretomado
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* In ''Franchise/StarOcean Ex'', Admiral Kenny's ship exits [[FasterThanLightTravel warp]] into the middle of one. Justified, in that it's the result of the BigBad's last planetary [[EarthShatteringKaboom visit]].

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* In ''Franchise/StarOcean Ex'', ''Anime/StarOceanEX'', Admiral Kenny's ship exits [[FasterThanLightTravel warp]] into the middle of one. Justified, in that it's the result of the BigBad's last planetary [[EarthShatteringKaboom visit]].
26th Mar '18 4:17:13 AM JackG
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* ''Series/TheGoodies''. RuleOfFunny version in "Invasion of the Moon Creatures". When their moon rocket goes through a meteor storm, Bill opens the window to take a picture and they all get pelted with rocks.
3rd Feb '18 8:54:27 PM nombretomado
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* The Asteroid fields in ''TabletopGame/BattlefleetGothic'' are an {{egregious}} example, probably caused by [[TheCoconutEffect the target audience expecting]] [[SpaceIsAnOcean "terrain" to fight around]]. The effects of asteroid fields are thus: Anything unguided (a space hulk, torpedoes and so on) are automatically destroyed upon entry. [[SpaceFighter Attack craft]] have a 1 in 6 chance of destruction and full space ships (from [[StandardSciFiFleet escorts to capital ships]]) must take a command check, and if failed can take crippling damage in a single instance.

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* The Asteroid fields in ''TabletopGame/BattlefleetGothic'' are an {{egregious}} JustForFun/{{egregious}} example, probably caused by [[TheCoconutEffect the target audience expecting]] [[SpaceIsAnOcean "terrain" to fight around]]. The effects of asteroid fields are thus: Anything unguided (a space hulk, torpedoes and so on) are automatically destroyed upon entry. [[SpaceFighter Attack craft]] have a 1 in 6 chance of destruction and full space ships (from [[StandardSciFiFleet escorts to capital ships]]) must take a command check, and if failed can take crippling damage in a single instance.
24th Jan '18 12:42:36 AM ScorpiusOB1
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It's unfortunate that RealLife asteroid fields, while they do exist, don't have such a flair for the dramatic. RealLife asteroids are strewn much farther apart from each other; ''so'' far that the chance of even ''seeing'' one (let alone crashing into one) is pretty much nil. This is because a truly violent asteroid thicket, in RealLife, would simply dash itself to bits in a short period of time. Also, due to gravity, even dust will be attracted to itself; larger rocks would gravitate towards each other even faster, and the whole asteroid field would eventually gather into a few fairly solid clusters -- in fact, this is fairly close to the going theory of how planets form from clouds of dust and rocks. Scientists have sent space probes through our solar system's main asteroid belt for decades, and haven't lost a single one in the process. While obviously no first-hand data is available about asteroid fields in other star systems, everything we know about physics tells us that they'd probably differ little from the ones in our own solar system and would be nothing like typical sci-fi depictions.

Conversely, planetary rings are (relatively) much more sparse in fiction than they are in real life. Voyager 2 flew through Saturn's G ring -- one of the fainter rings -- once, at an angle, and there was [[http://spaceflightnow.com/cassini/040612soi.html "lots of evidence of micrometeroid hits"]] on the quite small 4-meter diameter probe, and the Cassini spacecraft has used its antenna as shield when crossing the same ring during their mission at Saturn. The thickness of the rings is also surprisingly variable, ranging from under 10 meters to over a kilometer. However, aspiring SF writers should know that these planetary ring systems are mostly made up of ice (99% of the rings' content) and rocks 0.01 to 10 meters across.

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It's unfortunate that RealLife asteroid fields, while they do exist, don't have such a flair for the dramatic. RealLife asteroids are strewn much farther apart from each other; ''so'' far that the chance of even ''seeing'' one (let alone crashing into one) is pretty much nil. This is because a truly violent asteroid thicket, in RealLife, would simply dash itself to bits in a short period of time. Also, due to gravity, even dust will be attracted to itself; larger rocks would gravitate towards each other even faster, and the whole asteroid field would eventually gather into a few fairly solid clusters -- in fact, this is fairly close to the going theory of how planets form from clouds of dust and rocks. Scientists have sent space probes through our solar system's main asteroid belt for decades, including one -''Dawn''- that has studied bodies within it- and haven't lost a single one in the process. While obviously no first-hand data is available about asteroid fields in other star systems, everything we know about physics tells us that they'd probably differ little from the ones in our own solar system and would be nothing like typical sci-fi depictions.

Conversely, planetary rings are (relatively) much more sparse in fiction than they are in real life. Voyager 2 flew through Saturn's G ring -- one of the fainter rings -- once, at an angle, and there was [[http://spaceflightnow.com/cassini/040612soi.html "lots of evidence of micrometeroid hits"]] on the quite small 4-meter diameter probe, and the Cassini spacecraft has used its antenna as shield when crossing the same ring or the space between thr rings and the planet during their its mission at Saturn. The thickness of the rings is also surprisingly variable, ranging from under 10 meters to over a kilometer. However, aspiring SF writers should know that these planetary ring systems are mostly made up of ice (99% of the rings' content) and rocks 0.01 to 10 meters across.



** And there's the [[http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov Dawn spacecraft]], that went to the asteroid Vesta and after studying it for more than a year moved across the belt to (the now [[ScienceMarchesOn minor planet]]) Ceres, that is currently orbiting and is expected to be left there.
** The future [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki//Lucy_(spacecraft) Lucy]] mission will take asteroid study UpToEleven, moving to investigate some of Jupiter's Trojan asteroids then transversing the inner Solar System to research other Trojan asteroids -crossing the asteroid belt twice-. In addition another [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki//Psyche_(spacecraft) probe]] will be sent to the belt, this time to study the metallic asteroid [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki//16_Psyche Psyche]].

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** And there's the [[http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov Dawn spacecraft]], that went to the asteroid Vesta and after studying it for more than a year moved across the belt (of course without having to dodge asteroids ''Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack''-style) to (the now [[ScienceMarchesOn minor planet]]) Ceres, that is currently orbiting and is expected to be left there.
remain so after its mission has ended.
** The future [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki//Lucy_(spacecraft) Lucy]] mission will take asteroid study UpToEleven, moving to investigate some of Jupiter's Trojan asteroids then transversing the inner Solar System to research the other Trojan asteroids -crossing the asteroid belt twice-. In addition another [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki//Psyche_(spacecraft) probe]] will be sent to the belt, this time to study the metallic asteroid [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki//16_Psyche Psyche]].
7th Jan '18 4:21:37 PM Fireblood
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* ''Series/BlackMirror'': In ''[[Recap/BlackMirrorUSSCallister USS Callister]]'' it's justified because this is a game obstacle.
1st Jan '18 8:15:29 AM BattleMaster
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* Variation: Instead of an asteroid field, ''Film/GalaxyQuest'' has ships traveling through a space minefield. Which makes far more sense because, as a minefield, it's supposed to kill whoever enters it, and the mines were more or less stationary until a ship got close enough to set off magnetic sensors, and close enough together that the ship had trouble staying away from them.

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* Variation: Instead of an asteroid field, ''Film/GalaxyQuest'' has ships traveling through a space minefield. Which makes far more sense because, as a minefield, it's supposed to kill whoever enters it, and the mines were more or less stationary until a ship got close enough to set off magnetic sensors, and close enough together that the ship had trouble staying away from them. Except for the part about someone deliberately putting a minefield in empty space with the apparent hope that someone will eventually blunder into it.
26th Dec '17 10:15:09 PM DirtyHarry44Magnum
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* ''VideoGame/TreasurePlanetBattleAtProcyon'' features unrealistically dense asteroid belts on some maps as hazards, some of these asteroids are slow moving, but others can move quickly. Asteroids will break apart into smaller asteroids if they take enough damage.
29th Sep '17 11:41:25 AM Theriocephalus
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Compare SpaceClouds, a trope about the similarly unrealistic portrayal of nebula in fiction; also VulcanHasNoMoon for when objects in space are visible in locations where they make no sense (either due to the science or due to pre-established canon). Also compare ConvenientlyClosePlanet - an Asteroid Thicket could be considered "frustratingly close asteroids". A spaceborne equivalent to an AerialCanyonChase will take place in one. If there are AsteroidMiners here, they're going to have hazardous lives.

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Compare SpaceClouds, a trope about the similarly unrealistic portrayal of nebula in fiction; also VulcanHasNoMoon for when objects in space are visible in locations where they make no sense (either due to the science or due to pre-established canon). Also compare ConvenientlyClosePlanet - -- an Asteroid Thicket could be considered "frustratingly close asteroids". A spaceborne equivalent to an AerialCanyonChase will take place in one. If there are AsteroidMiners here, they're going to have hazardous lives.



* ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyVol2''. On being chased by a fleet of Sovereign attack drones, Quill doesn't hesitate to fly through a [[SpaceX quantum-asteroid]] field. After playing this trope straight with a deadly pursuit through the field (Quill squabbling with Rocket over who should fly the ship doesn't help) they reach the other side intact only to find the rest of the Sovereign fleet has just flown around it.

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* ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyVol2''. On ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyVol2'': While being chased by a fleet of Sovereign attack drones, Quill doesn't hesitate to fly through a [[SpaceX quantum-asteroid]] field.field, made of of red and blue asteroids that randomly appear, disappear and mutually annihilate like quantum particles. After playing this trope straight with a deadly pursuit through the field (Quill squabbling with Rocket over who should fly the ship doesn't help) they reach the other side intact only to find the rest of the Sovereign fleet has just flown around it.



* Averted and explained in ''The Martian Way'' by Creator/IsaacAsimov, who says that perhaps the spaceships didn't have to waste propellant to go around the asteroid belt, since, while on map it looks like a swarm of insects, it would take real stroke of bad luck in order to hit a rock.

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* Creator/IsaacAsimov:
**
Averted and explained in ''The Martian Way'' by Creator/IsaacAsimov, who says Way'', where it's said that perhaps the spaceships didn't have to waste propellant to go around the asteroid belt, since, while on map it looks like a swarm of insects, it would take real a serious stroke of bad luck in order to hit a rock.



* Justified and lampshaded in ''[[Literature/{{Starfire}} Crusade]]'' by Creator/DavidWeber. It first comes up in the context of a closed warp point (a [[OurWormholesAreDifferent warp point]] without a significant/detectable gravity field) that happens to exist in the middle of an asteroid belt, which led to the immediate destruction of small ships transiting due to collisions - a situation immediately stated as freakish and unique. One chapter later, an enemy uses an asteroid cluster in a different star system [[StealthInSpace to hide a fleet]], while musing that only in a handful of clusters do [[TakeThat/{{Literature}} "conditions even approach those... in popular entertainment."]]

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* Justified and lampshaded in ''[[Literature/{{Starfire}} Crusade]]'' by Creator/DavidWeber. It first comes up in the context of a closed warp point (a [[OurWormholesAreDifferent warp point]] without a significant/detectable gravity field) that happens to exist in the middle of an asteroid belt, which led to the immediate destruction of small ships transiting due to collisions - -- a situation immediately stated as freakish and unique. One chapter later, an enemy uses an asteroid cluster in a different star system [[StealthInSpace to hide a fleet]], while musing that only in a handful of clusters do [[TakeThat/{{Literature}} "conditions even approach those... in popular entertainment."]]



** To elaborate, in ''VideoGame/FreeSpace'', collisions (including with asteroids) don't do that much damage—you'll take some hull damage from the impact, but unless your ship is already about ready to fall apart, you'll be mostly fine. But capital ships are big, the asteroids are numerous, and the damage from asteroid hits will add up fairly quickly if you aren't diligent in blasting them apart before they hit. Made worse by the fact that these missions usually also involve some enemy or another attacking the ship at the same time…

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** To elaborate, in ''VideoGame/FreeSpace'', collisions (including with asteroids) don't do that much damage—you'll take some hull damage from the impact, but unless your ship is already about ready to fall apart, you'll be mostly fine. But capital ships are big, the asteroids are numerous, and the damage from asteroid hits will add up fairly quickly if you aren't diligent in blasting them apart before they hit. Made worse by the fact that these missions usually also involve some enemy or another attacking the ship at the same time…time...



* Averted in ''VideoGame/MasterOfOrion II'', where battles in asteroid fields don't actually feature any asteroids. However, blowing up a planet with a [[WaveMotionGun Stellar Converter]] and then rebuilding it with a colony in the same system can result in a larger and richer in resources planet than the original. So, apparently, a planet is more than the sum of its parts. Which actually makes sense as normally the core is filled with dense elements (more valuable ones, like gold or rhodium)--rebuilding the planet from the debris doesn't have to be done in the same way, causing more resources to be on the surface and without millennia of gravitational compression the size could be larger at first (although not the mass).

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* Averted in ''VideoGame/MasterOfOrion II'', where battles in asteroid fields don't actually feature any asteroids. However, blowing up a planet with a [[WaveMotionGun Stellar Converter]] and then rebuilding it with a colony in the same system can result in a larger and richer in resources planet than the original. So, apparently, a planet is more than the sum of its parts. Which actually makes sense as normally the core is filled with dense elements (more valuable ones, like gold or rhodium)--rebuilding rhodium) -- rebuilding the planet from the debris doesn't have to be done in the same way, causing more resources to be on the surface and without millennia of gravitational compression the size could be larger at first (although not the mass).



* In [[VideoGame/GalacticCivilizations Galactic Civilizations II]]: Justified in the representation of asteroid fields on the galaxy map (what else would you use as a map symbol for an asteroid field?) - but not justified in the cutscene when you investigate your first anomaly.

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* In [[VideoGame/GalacticCivilizations Galactic Civilizations II]]: Justified in the representation of asteroid fields on the galaxy map (what else would you use as a map symbol for an asteroid field?) - -- but not justified in the cutscene when you investigate your first anomaly.



* The old arcade game ''SDI - Strategic Defense Initiative''[[note]]The UsefulNotes/MasterSystem version is named ''Global Defense''[[/note]], by Sega, features a stage in the asteroid belt. All those floating rocks, however, are just scenery background that often have bases and/or weapons mounted and can be fired upon (and vice-versa).

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* The old arcade game ''SDI - -- Strategic Defense Initiative''[[note]]The UsefulNotes/MasterSystem version is named ''Global Defense''[[/note]], by Sega, features a stage in the asteroid belt. All those floating rocks, however, are just scenery background that often have bases and/or weapons mounted and can be fired upon (and vice-versa).



* In its earlier stages of development, the Solar System had a lot of debris floating around crashing into each other and eventually forming the inner planets. The Late Heavy Bombardment was the final cleanup of this debris by the inner planets absorbing them via impacts, the craters of which can still be seen on the Moon and Mercury (and Mars[[note]]...which has probably suffered the worst, as an oblique impact by a Moon-sized body has led to it losing a full half of its crust and is a root cause of the current difference between its northern and southern hemispheres.[[/note]]). However, even this hodgepodge would have been extremely thin compared to its fictional counterpart, with the "cleanup" taking hundreds of millions of years.

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* In its earlier stages of development, the Solar System had a lot of debris floating around crashing into each other and eventually forming the inner planets. The Late Heavy Bombardment was the final cleanup of this debris by the inner planets absorbing them via impacts, the craters of which can still be seen on the Moon and Mercury (and Mars[[note]]... which has probably suffered the worst, as an oblique impact by a Moon-sized body has led to it losing a full half of its crust and is a root cause of the current difference between its northern and southern hemispheres.[[/note]]). However, even this hodgepodge would have been extremely thin compared to its fictional counterpart, with the "cleanup" taking hundreds of millions of years.
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