History Main / AsLongAsItSOundsForeign

7th Feb '16 10:03:44 PM Anddrix
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Invoked in ''Film/HotTubTimeMachine''. When pretending to be a Russian spy, Nick brandishes the can of Chernobyl like it was a bomb and repeatedly shouts "Dosvedanya!", which is Russian for "Goodbye" or "Farewell."
to:
* Invoked in ''Film/HotTubTimeMachine''. When pretending to be a Russian spy, Nick brandishes the can of Chernobyl Chernobly like it was a bomb and repeatedly shouts "Dosvedanya!", which is Russian for "Goodbye" or "Farewell."
4th Feb '16 6:20:00 PM Prfnoff
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* In Music/MauriceRavel's opera ''L'enfant et les sortilèges'' (The Child and the Spells), the song sung by the Chinese Teacup is made up of Chinese- and Japanese-sounding syllables. Some correspond to actual words, many don't. ** It's even lampshaded in the end of the song : ''Hâ! Hâ! Ça-oh-râ toujours l'air chinoâ.'' (Ha ha, it'll still sound chi-neez !)
to:
* In Music/MauriceRavel's opera ''L'enfant et les sortilèges'' (The Child and the Spells), the song sung by the Chinese Teacup is made up of Chinese- and Japanese-sounding syllables. Some correspond to actual words, many don't. ** don't. It's even lampshaded in the end of the song : ''Hâ! Hâ! Ça-oh-râ toujours l'air chinoâ.'' (Ha ha, it'll still sound chi-neez !)

Added DiffLines:
* In Music/MauriceRavel's opera ''L'enfant et les sortilèges'' (The Child and the Spells), the song sung by the Chinese Teacup is made up ''The Musical of Chinese- and Japanese-sounding syllables. Some correspond to actual words, many don't. ** It's even lampshaded Musicals: The Musical!'' "Cell Block Tango" parody has a "Foreign Speaking Chorus Person" speaking words that, aside from a TakeThat at Liza Minnelli's wobbly singing, are largely unintelligible in the end of the song : ''Hâ! Hâ! Ça-oh-râ toujours l'air chinoâ.'' (Ha ha, it'll still sound chi-neez !)Hungarian or any other language: -->"Kinooschjka mit ooben ze mischka wobblin. Za bolschka wobbling. Iskcha wobble, wobblleshschka! Mit ikshsken za landlorda "No More MINELLI!"
3rd Feb '16 8:47:26 AM gregnes2000
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Video Game should be plural in this case.
[[folder: Video Game]]
to:
[[folder: Video Game]]Games]]
1st Feb '16 5:01:38 AM Temmere
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* Martin Denny's 1957 album "Exotica" spawned an entire musical genre of the same name, which Denny described as "a combination of the South Pacific and the Orient... what a lot of people imagined the islands to be like... it's pure fantasy though."
1st Feb '16 4:47:47 AM KingRaptor
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Häagen-Dazs details
* Häagen-Dazs ice cream is famous for having chosen a name which sounds... Danish? Hungarian? Foreign -- no matter what your native language is, but doesn't mean anything. In a bizarre and funny legal case, Häagen-Dazs tried to sue another American Ice Cream brand, Frusen Glädjé (which is--aside from the accent over the "e" meant to show Americans they were supposed to pronounce it--entirely correct Swedish for "frozen joy"), because the name was intended to fool consumers into thinking the ice cream was actually made in Sweden. Häagen-Dazs lost because of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unclean_hands "clean hands" doctrine]] - i.e., they were themselves equally guilty of using fake Scandinavian to sound old-timey and exotic, so couldn't blame others for using the same trick.
to:
* Häagen-Dazs ice cream is famous for having chosen its completely made-up "Danish-sounding" name.[[labelnote:*]]Jewish creator Reuben Mattus sought to honor Denmark for its excellent treatment of its Jews during WWII, and thought Denmark to have a name which sounds... Danish? Hungarian? Foreign -- no matter what your native language is, but doesn't mean anything. good reputation in the US (especially for dairy products).[[/labelnote]] In a bizarre and funny legal case, Häagen-Dazs tried to sue another American Ice Cream brand, Frusen Glädjé (which is--aside from the accent over the "e" meant to show Americans they were supposed to pronounce it--entirely correct Swedish for "frozen joy"), because the name was intended to fool consumers into thinking the ice cream was actually made in Sweden. Häagen-Dazs lost because of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unclean_hands "clean hands" doctrine]] - i.e., they were themselves equally guilty of using fake Scandinavian to sound old-timey and exotic, so couldn't blame others for using the same trick.
1st Feb '16 12:14:07 AM Dracedragon
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
IKEA does this with the names of their furniture. It's either foreign sounding place or just random Swedish words.
31st Jan '16 8:13:59 PM MsChibi
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
** UpToEleven in the {{Prequel}} ''LightNovel/AnotherNote'', with names comprised of random English words together, such as Beyond Birthday, Quarter Queen, and Bluesharp Babysplit.
19th Jan '16 8:19:05 AM CaptainCrawdad
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* There is an African character in ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'', a zebra named Zecora. In her first episode, she speaks a few lines of what is supposed to sound like Swahili. [[WordOfGod Lauren Faust]] explained that they were originally going to find someone who actually knew Swahili, but due to time constraints, Zecora's voice actor was told to just say some Swahili-sounding jibberish instead. Points for trying. ** The Breezies speak Swedish-sounding gibberish, which only Fluttershy can understand. *** Which sounds remarkably similar to the language spoken by the Bushrats from ''WesternAnimation/TazMania'', which sounds like a mishmash of German, French, Italian, and pig Latin coupled with a judicious bit of FunWithSubtitles. **** In one episode, they say at least one complete sentence in German: "Der Kaiser is nicht tot!" ("The Kaiser is not dead!")
to:
* There is an African character in ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'', a zebra named Zecora. In her first episode, she speaks a few lines of what is supposed to sound like Swahili. [[WordOfGod Lauren Faust]] explained that they were originally going to find someone who actually knew Swahili, but due to time constraints, Zecora's voice actor was told to just say some Swahili-sounding jibberish instead. Points for trying. ** trying. The Breezies speak Swedish-sounding gibberish, which only Fluttershy can understand. *** Which sounds remarkably similar to the * The language spoken by the Bushrats from ''WesternAnimation/TazMania'', which sounds like a mishmash of German, French, Italian, and pig Latin coupled with a judicious bit of FunWithSubtitles. **** In one episode, they say at least one complete sentence in German: "Der Kaiser is nicht tot!" ("The Kaiser is not dead!")FunWithSubtitles.
19th Jan '16 8:12:01 AM Kooshmeister
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
**** In one episode, they say at least one complete sentence in German: "Der Kaiser is nicht tot!" ("The Kaiser is not dead!")
10th Jan '16 4:41:04 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message
*** Shouldn't the plurals of ''caveat'' and ''imprimatur'' be ''caveant'' and ''imprimantur''?
to:
*** Shouldn't ** Similarly, "octopi" as the plurals plural of ''caveat'' "octopus" is not proper Latin, either: this word was a Greek loanword in Latin, and ''imprimatur'' be ''caveant'' and ''imprimantur''?would have taken the Greek plural ''octopodes''. (You should really just call them "octopuses.")

** One common error is to talk about computer viruses in the plural as "virii" -- evidently those who do this believe that the singular is "virius". If the word had a Latin plural (which it doesn't) it would be "* viri"... if it were masculine. It's actually one of the rare neuter nouns of the second declension that end in "-us", so it's hypothetical plural would actually be "* vira".
to:
** One common error is to talk about viruses (both the biological pathogens and the computer viruses kind) in the plural as "virii" -- evidently "virii"--evidently those who do this believe that the singular is "virius". If the word had a Latin plural (which it doesn't) it would be "* viri"... if it were masculine. It's actually one of the rare neuter nouns of the second declension that end in "-us", so it's hypothetical plural would actually be "* vira". (You should really just call them "viruses.")
This list shows the last 10 events of 418. Show all.