History Main / ArtisticLicenseReligion

13th Aug '17 6:13:38 PM Fireblood
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/VanHelsing'': Van Helsing must kill Dracula to prevent the Valerious family from "passing into Purgatory" and thus never reaching Heaven. Yeah, except that, according to Catholic dogma, passing into Purgatory means eventually ending up in Heaven. The movie states that they would be stuck in Purgatory forever, because of a special deal that the original Valerious made.
** Also, a friar isn't a lower degree of monk who hasn't leveled up to taking vows (that's a novice). Monks are members of monastic orders who profess the three vows (poverty, chastity, and obedience) and live in a cloistered ascetic community (like the abbey that Van Helsing says Carl has never left). Friars are members of mendicant orders who profess the three vows and live in the community at large, moving around as necessary to do their work. Carl's right, he's not a monk; but his brown habit and tonsure clearly mark him out as a Franciscan friar (Order of Friars Minor), which very definitely means a vow of chastity (though the way he says this to a woman implies that he's just taken advantage of her ignorance).
24th Jul '17 2:42:58 PM CybranGeneralSturm
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'': Despite employing demonic avatars of the SevenDeadlySins as a central motif, the story only uses four of the standard demons associated with a given sin as popularized by Peter Binsfeld: Asmodeus (Lust), Leviathan (Envy), Mammon (Gluttony) and Beelzebub (Greed), with Beelzebub using the name of the Semitic god he was a demonized form of, Baal. Lucifer (Pride) and Satan (Wrath) are replaced by Samael and ''the Sphinx'', respectively. Sloth has no demon associated with it, due to [[spoiler:being represented by the people of Tokyo as a whole]] and the game features an 8th sin in form of Vanity, which gets its own demon, Azazel.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'': Despite employing demonic avatars of the SevenDeadlySins as a central motif, the story only uses four of the standard demons associated with a given sin as popularized by Peter Binsfeld: Asmodeus (Lust), Leviathan (Envy), Mammon (Gluttony) (Greed) and Beelzebub (Greed), (Gluttony), with Beelzebub using the name of the Semitic god he was a demonized form of, Baal. Lucifer (Pride) and Satan (Wrath) are replaced by Samael and ''the Sphinx'', respectively. Sloth has no demon associated with it, due to [[spoiler:being represented by the people of Tokyo as a whole]] and the game features an 8th sin in the form of Vanity, which gets its own demon, Azazel.
7th Jul '17 6:10:46 AM Fireblood
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''{{Film/Silence}}'': The film has Ferreira claim that the Japanese can't imagine anything beyond nature, thus they mistook "the Son" for the sun. Now, not only does this homonym make no sense in both Portuguese and Japanese where they are different words, but {{UsefulNotes/Buddhism}} and {{UsefulNotes/Shinto}} both definitely were based on notions of the supernatural.
3rd Jul '17 1:43:11 PM DustSnitch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Any time ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' goes near religion. People have complained about the way Christianity and everything associated with it is being presented, but it's always had a bad track record with religion. Check out any episode where they talk about the old pagan gods; They Fail Religious Studies Forever by making it seem that there was apparently only one religion ever before Christianity hit the scene. The show just uses the term 'Pagan God' for any "god" of an old polytheistic religion. They specifically say the Trickster exists in Norse and Egyptian mythology, and that the Vanír were Norse gods, too.
** Lampshaded when Sam corrects a girl in the pilot, after she says that the pentacle is a symbol of Satanism.
** Try to find any mention of "66 of 666 seals" in Revelation.
** They had Castiel scold the boys for believing that the Antichrist will be the son of Satan. "Your Bible gets more wrong than it does right," he explains. Except... the Bible never describes the Devil having any children. You'd think an angel would know better (however, it was a popular piece of Christian folklore that the Devil fathered children with human women, but not official doctrine, which is likely where this idea comes from).

to:

* Any time ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' goes near religion. People have complained about religion.
** A girl in
the way Christianity and everything associated with it pilot episode claims the pentacle is being presented, a Satanic symbol, but it's always had a bad track record with religion. the trope is subverted when Sam corrects her by explaining the various other meanings ascribed to the symbol.
**
Check out any episode where they talk about the old pagan gods; They Fail Religious Studies Forever by making it seem that there was apparently only one religion ever before Christianity hit the scene. The show just uses the term 'Pagan God' for any "god" of an old polytheistic religion. religion, as if all the thousands of polytheistic religions were all a monolithic, united religion known as "Paganism." They specifically say the Trickster exists in Norse and Egyptian mythology, and that the Vanír were Norse gods, too.
** Lampshaded when Sam corrects a girl in the pilot, after she says The fourth season deals with our heroes trying to make sure that the pentacle is a symbol of Satanism.
** Try to find any mention of
at least "66 of 666 seals" keeping {{Satan}} in Revelation.
{{Hell}} remain in place, since the Literature/BookOfRevelation says that this will begin the Apocalypse. One problem: there is nothing about "66 of 666 seals" anywhere in Revelation, it's something made up to provide an [[MonsterOfTheWeek episode-to-episode conflict]] for the 20+ episode season.
** They had Castiel An angel scold the boys for believing that the Antichrist will be the son of Satan. "Your Bible [[Literature/TheBible Bible]] gets more wrong than it does right," he explains. Except... the Bible never describes the Devil having any children. children and it also fails to mention a singular figure called "the Antichrist." The former is a piece of popular folklore and the latter is name applied to the two Beasts described in the final book of the New Testament. You'd think an angel would know better (however, it was a popular piece of Christian folklore that the Devil fathered children with human women, but not official doctrine, which is likely where this idea comes from). better.



*** A similar mispronunciation with the ghost of Halloween in ''WesternAnimation/TheRealGhostbusters'', although that may possibly be deliberate.
** According to ''Supernatural'', if an angel falls from grace they become human, but according to Christian theology if an angel falls from grace then they become a demon. Hence the term "fallen angel". This is probably down to [[Film/CityOfAngels a certain film]] in which an angel falls in love with a woman and becomes human by, er, jumping from a building.
** Particularly egregious when Sam, in order to create purified blood, confesses one particular sin (as he sees it) in an empty confessional booth. Reconciliation (the sacrament) involves going to an actual priest, reciting a specific prayer, confessing ''all'' sins, and doing some sort of penance, ''none'' of which Sam does. It's implied that he does something similar to prayer, which, while very nice, isn't the same thing as reconciliation.

to:

*** A similar mispronunciation with the ghost of Halloween in ''WesternAnimation/TheRealGhostbusters'', although that may possibly be deliberate.
** According to ''Supernatural'', if an angel falls from grace they become human, but according to Christian theology theology, if an angel falls from grace then they become a demon. Hence the term "fallen angel". This is probably down to [[Film/CityOfAngels a certain film]] in which an angel falls in love with a woman and becomes human by, er, jumping from a building.
** Particularly egregious when Despite having a two season arc where the forces of Heaven and Hell conspire to make the events of the Literature/BookOfRevelation happen, the Second Coming of Jesus isn't even referenced, despite the fact that the entire point of the Revelation is that the whole Apocalypse serves as a sign of the coming and final judgement of Christ. Reasons for this notable absence include the secular leanings of the writers, the strong effect of the JesusTaboo, and the difficulty of aligning the show's antagonistic take on {{Heaven}} and the popular notion that JesusWasWayCool.
**
Sam, in order to create purified blood, confesses one particular sin (as he sees it) in an empty confessional booth. Reconciliation (the sacrament) involves going to an actual priest, reciting a specific prayer, confessing ''all'' sins, and doing some sort of penance, ''none'' of which Sam does. It's implied that he does something similar to prayer, which, while very nice, isn't the same thing as reconciliation.
16th Jun '17 6:58:54 PM DustSnitch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder:Film]]

to:

[[folder:Film]][[folder:Films -- Animated]]
* ''Film/ThePrinceOfEgypt'': [[http://imgur.com/e4pqpdX The disclaimer at the opening of the film is open and straightforward about this]]. Some changes are made from the original Exodus story for the sake of drama.
** In the original story, Moses was most certainly ''not'' a Prince. He was raised in Pharaoh's court, so he would have been considered nobility, but not royalty.
** Moses probably always knew that he was a Hebrew in the original story, whereas in this film he does not figure it out until around his adult life.
** In Exodus, Moses and Aaron are 80 and 83 years old, respectively, at the time of the plagues. While Moses is shown to have spent at least several years as a shepherd, he is still very much a young man when he confronts Rameses here.[[note]]This change is probably due to the shorter lifespans on the Pharaohs' part--an 80-year old Moses would've been very unlikely to have confronted the same prince he grew up with. That said, the Pharaoh of the film is clearly meant to be Rameses the Great, who lived to be 90[[/note]]
** Moses had Aaron actually deal with Pharaoh in the original story and also perform most of the miracles, in this version he does it all himself.
** Moses deliberately murdered the Egyptian guard whipping the slave and went so far as to try and hide the body. Here, the guard's death was a complete accident.
** The Bible never mentions Pharaoh's name, only ever referring to him by title. Historians do not agree on which Pharoah is most likely the one written of in Exodus. The film goes with Seti I as the Pharaoh who ordered the purge, and Rameses II as the Pharaoh at the time of the Plagues, which is one possibility, but not one considered very likely by most scholars.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



* ''Film/ThePrinceOfEgypt'': [[http://imgur.com/e4pqpdX The disclaimer at the opening of the film is open and straightforward about this]]. Some changes are made from the original Exodus story for the sake of drama:
** In the original story, Moses was most certainly ''not'' a Prince. He was raised in Pharaoh's court, so he would have been considered nobility, but not royalty.
** Moses probably always knew that he was a Hebrew in the original story, whereas in this film he does not figure it out until around his adult life.
** In Exodus, Moses and Aaron are 80 and 83 years old, respectively, at the time of the plagues. While Moses is shown to have spent at least several years as a shepherd, he is still very much a young man when he confronts Rameses here.[[note]]This change is probably due to the shorter lifespans on the Pharaohs' part--an 80-year old Moses would've been very unlikely to have confronted the same prince he grew up with. That said, the Pharaoh of the film is clearly meant to be Rameses the Great, who lived to be 90[[/note]]
** Moses had Aaron actually deal with Pharaoh in the original story and also perform most of the miracles, in this version he does it all himself.
** Moses deliberately murdered the Egyptian guard whipping the slave and went so far as to try and hide the body. Here, the guard's death was a complete accident.
** The Bible never mentions Pharaoh's name, only ever referring to him by title. Historians do not agree on which Pharoah is most likely the one written of in Exodus. The film goes with Seti I as the Pharaoh who ordered the purge, and Rameses II as the Pharaoh at the time of the Plagues, which is one possibility, but not one considered very likely by most scholars.
16th Jun '17 6:55:19 PM DustSnitch
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/ThePrinceOfEgypt'': [[http://imgur.com/e4pqpdX The disclaimer at the opening of the film is open and straightforward about this]]. Some changes are made from the original Exodus story for the sake of drama:
** In the original story, Moses was most certainly ''not'' a Prince. He was raised in Pharaoh's court, so he would have been considered nobility, but not royalty.
** Moses probably always knew that he was a Hebrew in the original story, whereas in this film he does not figure it out until around his adult life.
** In Exodus, Moses and Aaron are 80 and 83 years old, respectively, at the time of the plagues. While Moses is shown to have spent at least several years as a shepherd, he is still very much a young man when he confronts Rameses here.[[note]]This change is probably due to the shorter lifespans on the Pharaohs' part--an 80-year old Moses would've been very unlikely to have confronted the same prince he grew up with. That said, the Pharaoh of the film is clearly meant to be Rameses the Great, who lived to be 90[[/note]]
** Moses had Aaron actually deal with Pharaoh in the original story and also perform most of the miracles, in this version he does it all himself.
** Moses deliberately murdered the Egyptian guard whipping the slave and went so far as to try and hide the body. Here, the guard's death was a complete accident.
** The Bible never mentions Pharaoh's name, only ever referring to him by title. Historians do not agree on which Pharoah is most likely the one written of in Exodus. The film goes with Seti I as the Pharaoh who ordered the purge, and Rameses II as the Pharaoh at the time of the Plagues, which is one possibility, but not one considered very likely by most scholars.
11th Jun '17 3:23:21 PM TedEldritch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'': Despite employing demonic avatars of the SevenDeadlySins as a central motif, the story only uses four of the standard demons associated with a given sin as popularized by Peter Binsfeld: Asmodeus (Lust) and Leviathan (Envy), Mammon (Gluttony) and Beelzebub (Greed), with Beelzebub using the name of the Semitic god he was a demonized form of, Baal. Lucifer (Pride) and Satan (Wrath) are replaced by Samael and ''the Sphinx'', respectively. Sloth has no demon associated with it, due to [[spoiler:being represented by the people of Tokyo as a whole]] and the game features an 8th sin in form of Vanity, which gets its own demon, Azazel.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'': Despite employing demonic avatars of the SevenDeadlySins as a central motif, the story only uses four of the standard demons associated with a given sin as popularized by Peter Binsfeld: Asmodeus (Lust) and (Lust), Leviathan (Envy), Mammon (Gluttony) and Beelzebub (Greed), with Beelzebub using the name of the Semitic god he was a demonized form of, Baal. Lucifer (Pride) and Satan (Wrath) are replaced by Samael and ''the Sphinx'', respectively. Sloth has no demon associated with it, due to [[spoiler:being represented by the people of Tokyo as a whole]] and the game features an 8th sin in form of Vanity, which gets its own demon, Azazel.
11th Jun '17 3:22:33 PM TedEldritch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'': Despite employing demonic avatars of the SevenDeadlySins as a central motif, the story only uses two of the standard demons associated with a given sin as popularized by Peter Binsfeld: Asmodeus (Lust) and Leviathan (Envy). Meanwhile, Beelzebub (Gluttony) and Mammon (Greed) have their sins flipped, and Beelzebub uses the name of the Semitic god he was a demonized form of, Baal. Belphegor (Sloth) and Satan (Wrath) are completely replaced by Azazel and Samael. Finally, Lucifer (Pride) is replaced with the Gnostic interpretation of the fallen angel, Satanael.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'': Despite employing demonic avatars of the SevenDeadlySins as a central motif, the story only uses two four of the standard demons associated with a given sin as popularized by Peter Binsfeld: Asmodeus (Lust) and Leviathan (Envy). Meanwhile, Beelzebub (Envy), Mammon (Gluttony) and Mammon (Greed) have their sins flipped, and Beelzebub uses (Greed), with Beelzebub using the name of the Semitic god he was a demonized form of, Baal. Belphegor (Sloth) Lucifer (Pride) and Satan (Wrath) are completely replaced by Azazel Samael and Samael. Finally, Lucifer (Pride) is replaced ''the Sphinx'', respectively. Sloth has no demon associated with it, due to [[spoiler:being represented by the Gnostic interpretation people of Tokyo as a whole]] and the fallen angel, Satanael.
game features an 8th sin in form of Vanity, which gets its own demon, Azazel.
4th Jun '17 12:47:50 PM CaptainCrawdad
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/TheMummy1999'': Anyone else wondering why the ''Jewish'' God is bothering to reenact the ten plagues of Egypt (''out of order'', no less), for the sake of an ''Egyptian'' curse?
** Exodus 7:22 says that 'Egyptian magicians did the same things by their secret arts' (after the waters of Nile changed to blood). Imhotep in the movie is an accomplished priest/magician.
4th Jun '17 12:45:38 PM CaptainCrawdad
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* PlayedForLaughs in the TabletopGame/{{poker}} tournament movie ''The Grand'', where Larry Schwartzman shows up to a table wearing a hijab and claiming to have converted to "Muslam". This was a scare tactic against "Sob Story" Barry Blausteen, an expert at psyching out his opponents who happened to be Jewish.

to:

* PlayedForLaughs in the TabletopGame/{{poker}} tournament movie ''The Grand'', ''Film/TheGrand'', where Larry Schwartzman shows up to a table wearing a hijab and claiming to have converted to "Muslam". This was a scare tactic against "Sob Story" Barry Blausteen, an expert at psyching out his opponents who happened to be Jewish.
This list shows the last 10 events of 685. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ArtisticLicenseReligion