History Main / ArtisticLicenseMartialArts

15th Apr '17 8:12:38 PM Candi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: General]]
* Flip, flip, flip, flip. Everywhere you look in fiction you see martial arts depicted as being at least 1/3 acrobatics. In real life moves like flips and handsprings are excessively dangerous unnecessary show-off moves to use in a martial arts match, and the few martial arts moves which do include such spectacular gymnastic feats tend to be very high risk maneuvers. Flying kicks, broadly, fall in the same category. One issue is that once you leave the ground, you have no control over your path, which will be towards the opponent. Martial artists (as an over-generalization) train these moves because they are a good way of working on balance, control, and fitness, which will then translate to simpler moves, but it's incredibly rare to see anyone sparring with a flying side kick. Even the most acrobatic martial art in popular culture, UsefulNotes/{{Capoeira}}, teaches specifically to relegate fancy flips to friendly ''rodas'' and keep at least one hand or foot firmly planted on the ground during convoluted moves.
* You can sum up about 90% of this trope in anime and movies with a single point: an efficient strike is ''not'' telegraphed. Each time you see someone preparing his punch by putting his arm far BEHIND him to get more momentum, it's just for show. Used a lot because it makes the strikes more impressive and make them feel stronger, but it's just ''bad'' in a fight, where a smart opponent will simply crush your face with a less impressive, but much faster and more efficient, direct strike.
* CrossCounter: Depending on the martial art, in a real fight you always keep your guard up when you punch (with your free hand) or kick (with both hands). This is done, precisely, to avoid your opponent's counter strikes. This is less typical amongst grapplers.
* Any time a martial artist fights off two, three or more people at once, this trope is being invoked. It's hard, but possible to fight multiple opponents if a fighter maintains techniques to control the fight and keep it close to one-on-one. In fiction however, the lone fighter will typically be able to KO or incapacitate the people attacking him with a single blow each as they rush at him one at a time, whereas people are generally tougher in real life, and more willing to avert MookChivalry.
* Martial artist characters tend to face unarmed opponents, or opponents who use weapons in absurdly ineffective ways. Marching toward the fighter with knife or club held rigidly overhead, holding the blade extended instead of cutting on the retraction, making huge swooping swings that your grandmother could dodge, and the classic "walk up to kissing distance with a gun instead of shooting him from across the room."
* An instance typically seen in martial arts flicks involves the character, whenever pitted against an opponent armed with a gun or knife, disarming him with a lightning kick to the hand holding the weapon. This is not only very improbable to pull, but also downright counterproductive: even if one is fast enough to strike it before the opponent reacts, kicking a gun could get it to fire by accident, not to mention if the guy is wielding a bladed weapon, as hitting your foot against it could result in a sound ouch. In real life, disarming is a close-quarter grappling process which requires expertise and speed, and obviously, it is ''never'' without risks.
* Breaking is a complicated subject. Not all martial arts styles include it at all, and those which do can do things that would certainly surprise most people. On the other hand, generally breaking is performed on materials which are fairly weak under tension (brick, concrete, wood broken with the grain [[note]]That is, with the grain in one of the short directions, the way that lumber is not usually sold for very good reasons aside from trees not growing sideways[[/note]]), and also supported only at the ends. It also requires careful training of the impact area (especially knuckles), which can leave it looking fairly ugly. If someone is breaking most of these rules (kicking a hole in a chain-link fence with a move they saw an older student doing once), this trope is probably being invoked.
* When a martial artist appears in fiction using a weapon that is called a sai, it's almost always something that would more properly be called a dagger or a stiletto. A real sai is a blunt weapon that is used defensively (historically they were used by police for crowd control, much like the jutte, which is similar) and attacks are mostly swinging strikes (like a truncheon) rather than stabs (which are possible, but rare).
* {{Flynning}} is this trope with swords, and all forms of swordsmanship are martial arts. Additionally, pretty much every weapon that this trope can be applied to will have this trope applied.
* Size and strength differentials in hand-to-hand combat are greatly undervalued when UnderdogsNeverLose, MusclesAreMeaningless and GenderIsNoObject. Whether the hero is [[WeakButSkilled Weak but Skilled]], a CuteBruiser, a LittleMissBadass who is skilled at WaifFu, or a downright PintsizedPowerhouse, he or she will rarely have the difficulty you would expect in taking down opponents who are far larger and stronger. In real life, however, weight classes exist for a reason. And in real life, the techniques that smaller fighters can learn to enhance their fighting prowess? The big guys can learn them too.
* If you ever see a depiction of a martial artist trying to kick someone despite having a perfectly good sword (or other reasonably lengthy weapon) at hand, it's almost always because of this trope. Swords have all the advantages of a kick (better power and range than a hand technique) and none of the weaknesses (generally slower than a hand strike and requires the attacker to balance on one foot). And if the opponent ''also'' has a sword, this trope is definitely in effect - the only reason a competent martial artist would ever eschew the use of their weapon in favour of a kick against an armed opponent is if they didn't really like that particular limb and wanted to see how good their dojo's disability benefits were.
[[/folder]]
5th Dec '16 8:31:01 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the ''Double Dragon'' animated series, Jimmy Lee has what Billy called "deadly Shadow Moves", which one of the kids learned when he watched Jimmy practice.

to:

* In the ''Double Dragon'' ''WesternAnimation/DoubleDragon'' animated series, Jimmy Lee has what Billy called "deadly Shadow Moves", which one of the kids learned when he watched Jimmy practice.
5th Dec '16 8:30:35 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Similar to ''The Flintstones'' episode mentioned above, one episode of ''[[WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory Dexter's Laboratory]]'' had the characters learn a "free Judo lesson" that involved shrieking "AAAAAH, SHITAKE!!!" while flying through the air at the opponent.

to:

* Similar to ''The Flintstones'' episode mentioned above, one One episode of ''[[WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory Dexter's Laboratory]]'' ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'' had the characters learn a "free Judo lesson" that involved shrieking "AAAAAH, SHITAKE!!!" while flying through the air at the opponent.
5th Dec '16 8:29:51 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder:Film]]

to:

[[folder:Film]] [[folder:Films -- Animated]]


Added DiffLines:

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
5th Dec '16 8:24:14 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The 2010 reboot of ''Karate Kid'', apparently needing to upstage the original, climaxes with a magical reverse flip kick that wouldn't be out-of-place in a {{Wuxia}} film.

to:

* The 2010 reboot of ''Karate Kid'', rebooted ''Film/TheKarateKid2010'', apparently needing to upstage the original, climaxes with a magical reverse flip kick that wouldn't be out-of-place in a {{Wuxia}} film.
5th Dec '16 8:23:50 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/JetLi protagonists indulge in being BadAss and fending off one MultiMookMelee after another, but since he is a trained martial artist, his fight choreography has ShownTheirWork and tend to be grounded in more realistic martial arts moves than your average {{wuxia}} movie, and when it's fantastical, the setting is as well.

to:

* Creator/JetLi protagonists indulge in being BadAss badass and fending off one MultiMookMelee after another, but since he is a trained martial artist, his fight choreography has ShownTheirWork and tend to be grounded in more realistic martial arts moves than your average {{wuxia}} movie, and when it's fantastical, the setting is as well.
14th Nov '16 10:39:05 PM darkknight109
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** If you ever see a depiction of a martial artist trying to kick someone despite having a perfectly good sword (or other reasonably lengthy weapon) at hand, it's almost always because of this trope. Swords have all the advantages of a kick (better power and range than a hand technique) and none of the weaknesses (generally slower than a hand strike and requires the attacker to balance on one foot). And if the opponent ''also'' has a sword, this trope is definitely in effect - the only reason a competent martial artist would ever eschew the use of their weapon in favour of a kick against an armed opponent is if they didn't really like that particular limb and wanted to see how good their dojo's disability benefits were.

to:

** * If you ever see a depiction of a martial artist trying to kick someone despite having a perfectly good sword (or other reasonably lengthy weapon) at hand, it's almost always because of this trope. Swords have all the advantages of a kick (better power and range than a hand technique) and none of the weaknesses (generally slower than a hand strike and requires the attacker to balance on one foot). And if the opponent ''also'' has a sword, this trope is definitely in effect - the only reason a competent martial artist would ever eschew the use of their weapon in favour of a kick against an armed opponent is if they didn't really like that particular limb and wanted to see how good their dojo's disability benefits were.
14th Nov '16 10:38:53 PM darkknight109
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** If you ever see a depiction of a martial artist trying to kick someone despite having a perfectly good sword (or other reasonably lengthy weapon) at hand, it's almost always because of this trope. Swords have all the advantages of a kick (better power and range than a hand technique) and none of the weaknesses (generally slower than a hand strike and requires the attacker to balance on one foot). And if the opponent ''also'' has a sword, this trope is definitely in effect - the only reason a competent martial artist would ever eschew the use of their weapon in favour of a kick against an armed opponent is if they didn't really like that particular limb and wanted to see how good their dojo's disability benefits were.
29th Oct '16 3:53:25 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''HajimeNoIppo'':

to:

* ''HajimeNoIppo'':''Manga/HajimeNoIppo'':
26th Sep '16 6:33:23 PM Odacon_Spy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Some of the earlier fights in ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' had poor choreography on Robin's part. Several times he backflips ''away'' from the enemy to kick them. Fortunately he cleaned up his act in later seasons. This might be deliberate given that every time he fought [[Big Bad]]Slade (who didn't bother with flips or gymnastics at all), Slade kicked his ass.

to:

* Some of the earlier fights in ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' had poor choreography on Robin's part. Several times he backflips ''away'' from the enemy to kick them. Fortunately he cleaned up his act in later seasons. This might be deliberate given that every time he fought [[Big Bad]]Slade [[BigBad Slade]] (who didn't bother with flips or gymnastics at all), Slade kicked his ass.
This list shows the last 10 events of 327. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ArtisticLicenseMartialArts