History Main / ArmorIsUseless

22nd Apr '18 11:11:30 AM Deuce
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*During the UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar Arthur Haselrig outfitted a regiment of cuirassiers: fully plate-armoured horsemen. Cuirassiers were considered obsolete across Europe by the start of the war and the "Lobsters" were something of a joke to their Royalist opponents and probably to some of the Parliamentarians too. However, they were actually very effective, being almost invulnerable to the weapons of the day. They were defeated once or twice by Royalist cavalry but largely due to poor tactical decisions failing to make good use of them.
21st Apr '18 11:38:54 PM patriciovalencia117
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** As a rule, putting heavy armor on your mobile suit is next to useless against Char, as he's savvy enough to: 1)pack weapons that can pierce said armor (the heat hawk can cut through it, and a mecha-scale bazooka capable of penetrating ''battleship armor'' can pass through the armour of the usually {{Nigh Invulnerab|ility}}le Gundam like a hot ''bullet'' through butter. This is what he went around with before getting the beam weapons that made armour useless in general); 2)if for some reason he doesn't have weapons powerful enough, he knows how to work around said armour (on his first fight with the Gundam, for example, his reaction to finding his current loadout useless was to ''kick the Gundam on the cockpit'' to throw the pilot around like a ragdoll, nearly killing Amuro before being forced to retreat).

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** As a rule, putting heavy armor on your mobile suit is next to useless against Char, as he's savvy enough to: 1)pack 1.) pack weapons that can pierce said armor (the heat hawk can cut through it, and a mecha-scale bazooka capable of penetrating ''battleship armor'' can pass through the armour armor of the usually {{Nigh Invulnerab|ility}}le Gundam like a hot ''bullet'' through butter. This is what he went around with before getting the beam weapons that made armour armor useless in general); 2)if 2.) If for some reason he doesn't have weapons powerful enough, he knows how to work around said armour armor (on his first fight with the Gundam, for example, his reaction to finding his current loadout useless was to ''kick the Gundam on the cockpit'' to throw the pilot around like a ragdoll, nearly killing Amuro before being forced to retreat).
19th Apr '18 11:05:05 PM Gatordragon24
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* Averted in ''VideoGame/{{Paladins}}''. Fernando and Ash wear immense suits of armour that give them their huge tank health pools. The other frontlines have similar character design justifications for their health, such as being a stone-skinned giantess, an enormous tortoise, or a mech. Barrick has the least health of the frontlines due to his much smaller stature but his body armour gives him more than any non-frontline.

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* Averted in ''VideoGame/{{Paladins}}''. Fernando Fernando, Ash, and Ash Khan wear immense suits of armour that give them their huge tank health pools. The other frontlines have similar character design justifications for their health, such as being a stone-skinned giantess, an enormous tortoise, or a mech. Barrick Barik has the least health of the frontlines due to his much smaller stature but his body armour gives him more than any non-frontline.
10th Apr '18 3:46:32 PM Rhodes7
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* ''Film/PrinceCaspian'' prompted at least one reviewer to throw up his hands and declare the Pevensies all had lightsabers disguised as swords, given how quickly and easily they'd kill men in full plate with a single slash across the chest over and over again.


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* ''Literature/{{Gor}}'' is a case where wearing armor is explicitly more dangerous than not, the same aliens who enforce MedievalStasis on Gor also incinerate armored combatants with heat beams from space. Their given rationale is reintroducing Darwinian selection pressures, only the quickest and the strongest live to reproduce, rather than those wealthy enough to afford armor. Only helmets are permitted. Yet archery and crossbows are fine, and indeed more effective where only shields can stop them.


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* Played with in ''Literature/APracticalGuideToEvil''. Armor is generally good, and saves people's lives many times. It is also useless against a variety of magic weapons in the setting and touch and go at best against Named. In at least one case, a minor character, the Exiled Prince is hilariously killed through misuse of his armor. It was enchanted to deflect arrows and quarrels, which was great, but he didn't wear the helmet so as to inspire his men. Thus a bolt that ''would'' have harmlessly dinged off the thickest portion of his breastplate was instead magically deflected up into his unprotected head.
10th Apr '18 9:35:19 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* Averted in ''WesternAnimation/KuboAndTheTwoStrings''; Kubo's quest is to find his father's armor as it is the only thing that can protect him from his enemies. And in fact the armor helps Kubo to survive the attacks by the Moon King.



* Played straight in ''Film/ThreeHundred'', which mimics the [[ShirtlessScene bare-chested]] Spartan battle outfit found in Frank Miller's graphic novel.
** Though oddly zig-zagged in the sequel. While Athenian forces run around no less naked than their Spartan counterparts, main character Themistocles is saved not once, but twice by his helmet, and the only Athenian to receive a head injury takes an arrow THROUGH the eye-slit.

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* Played straight in ''Film/ThreeHundred'', which mimics the [[ShirtlessScene bare-chested]] Spartan battle outfit found in Frank Miller's graphic novel.
** Though oddly zig-zagged in the sequel. While Athenian forces run around no less naked than their Spartan counterparts, main character Themistocles is saved not once, but twice by his helmet,
novel. The Spartans do wear helmets and the only Athenian shields, however, which are shown to receive a head injury takes an arrow THROUGH the eye-slit.block several blows.



* Discussed in ''Film/TheDarkKnight'' when Lucius and Bruce are discussing upgrading/improving Batman's armour - increasing it's worth against knives makes it less resistant against bullets and vice versa, and the payoff to agility and speed is less protection. Both are truth in television.

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* Discussed in ''Film/TheDarkKnight'' when Lucius and Bruce are discussing upgrading/improving Batman's armour - increasing it's its worth against knives makes it less resistant against bullets and vice versa, and the payoff to agility and speed is less protection. Both are truth in television.



* Noticeable in the final battle in ''{{Dragonheart}}''.

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* Noticeable in the final battle in ''{{Dragonheart}}''.''Film/{{Dragonheart}}''.



* {{Averted|Trope}} in ''Film/KingsmanTheSecretService''. The Kingsmen's specially-made suits are bulletproof and knife-resistant, as Harry mentions to Eggsy in the tailor shop. This comes in handy later on several occasions, particularly when [[spoiler:Harry gets shot several times in the course of the church fight]].



** In ''The Fellowship of the Ring'', Merry and Pippin take several heavily armored Uruk-hai down by throwing rocks at their heavily armored heads. [[note]]Sort of TruthInTelevision, as medieval helmets, ''on their own'', offer limited protection against blunt-force blows -- the helmet prevents cutting edges from making a mess of your head, but without some form of shock-absorbing padding it does next to nothing to mitigate the effects of a few pounds of steel (or rock) smacking into it at speed.[[/note]]

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** In ''The Fellowship of the Ring'', Merry and Pippin take several heavily armored Uruk-hai down by throwing rocks at their heavily armored heads. [[note]]Sort of TruthInTelevision, as medieval helmets, ''on their own'', offer limited protection against blunt-force blows -- the helmet prevents cutting edges from making a mess of your head, but without some form of shock-absorbing padding it does next to nothing to mitigate the effects of a few pounds of steel (or rock) smacking into it at speed.[[/note]]



*** OurElvesAreBetter, so much better that Legolas manages to shoot an arrow through two Uruk-Hai warriors and both of their breastplates. The armor was so useless, the arrow penetrated four plates of steel and two bodies.
** Also present in ''Film/TheHobbit'', particularly when [[spoiler: Thorin stabs Azog straight through his breastplate.]]

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*** OurElvesAreBetter, so much better that ** Legolas manages to shoot an arrow through two Uruk-Hai warriors and both of their breastplates. The armor was so useless, the arrow penetrated four plates of steel and two bodies.
** Also present in ''Film/TheHobbit'', particularly when [[spoiler: * ''Film/TheHobbit'': Thorin stabs Azog straight through his breastplate.]]



* Averted in season 3 of ''Series/BreakingBad'' when the Cousins use bullet proof vests [[spoiler: in their mission to kill Hank. One of them takes several handgun bullets to the chest and walks away unharmed. [[BoomHeadshot Too bad it didn't cover his head]]]].



* Averted in ''Series/{{Firefly}}''. In the pilot, Zoe wears a bulletproof vest to the meeting with Patience, expecting violence to ensue. When it inevitably does, she takes a bullet to the chest and is knocked flat and apparently unconscious for a couple minutes, but is otherwise unwounded. In [[Film/{{Serenity}} the movie]], the Operative likewise wears full body armor to his meeting with Mal, and it likewise saves his life when Mal loses his temper.
* ''Series/GameOfThrones'':
** {{Discussed}} when Ser Jorah Mormont debates the merits of armor with Rakharo. Jorah argues that armor will make a slashing ''arakh'' useless, while Rakharo believes speed trumps protection.
** Averted when Jorah Mormont, wearing plate armor, fights against a more agile but unarmored Dothraki warrior. The Dothraki lands a blow but his arakh gets stuck in Mormont's armor and doesn't hurt him; Mormont uses that moment to kill the Dothraki.
** Averted in Season 4 when the Hound, unimpressed with her water-dancing technique, invites Arya to stick her fencing blade into him. The sharp point stops against the armour and the Hound knocks her down, pointing out that her swordfighting instructor got himself killed because his opponent had little skill, but had armour and a big f**king sword.
** And played stunningly straight ''the following episode'' when Ramsay Bolton manages to kill several fully armed soldiers while half-naked.

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* Averted in ''Series/{{Firefly}}''. In ''Series/GameOfThrones'' often discusses and averts the pilot, Zoe wears a bulletproof vest to the meeting with Patience, expecting violence to ensue. When it inevitably does, she takes a bullet to the chest and is knocked flat and apparently unconscious for a couple minutes, trope, but is otherwise unwounded. In [[Film/{{Serenity}} the movie]], the Operative likewise wears full body armor to his meeting with Mal, and plays it likewise saves his life when Mal loses his temper.
* ''Series/GameOfThrones'':
** {{Discussed}} when Ser Jorah Mormont debates the merits of armor with Rakharo. Jorah argues that armor will make a slashing ''arakh'' useless, while Rakharo believes speed trumps protection.
** Averted when Jorah Mormont, wearing plate armor, fights against a more agile but unarmored Dothraki warrior. The Dothraki lands a blow but his arakh gets stuck in Mormont's armor and doesn't hurt him; Mormont uses that moment to kill the Dothraki.
** Averted in Season 4 when the Hound, unimpressed with her water-dancing technique, invites Arya to stick her fencing blade into him. The sharp point stops against the armour and the Hound knocks her down, pointing out that her swordfighting instructor got himself killed because his opponent had little skill, but had armour and a big f**king sword.
** And played stunningly
straight ''the following episode'' when at other times:
**
Ramsay Bolton manages to kill several fully armed soldiers while half-naked.



** {{Reconstruct|ion}}ed when Bronn champions Tyrion against Ser Vardis Egan. Bronn refuses a shield and wears almost no armor, using his speed and maneuverability to simply evade his opponent until Egan's heavy armor exhausts him and makes him a sitting duck.

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** {{Reconstruct|ion}}ed when Bronn champions Tyrion against Ser Vardis Egan. Bronn refuses a shield and wears almost no armor, using his speed and maneuverability to simply evade his opponent until Egan's heavy armor exhausts him and makes him a sitting duck.



** Averted completely with Barristan Selmy, if he were wearing armor then he would have likely survived the fight that killed him. In the books, he wore a full suit of plate all the time as part of his duties.



** Realistically averted in one episode where SG-1 is doing an operation on Earth wearing bulletproof vests. Col. Simmons shoots O'Neill twice in the back. One bullet is stopped by the vest and breaks a rib, the other hits him in his unarmored arm.
---> '''O'Neill:''' I want sleeves on my vest.
** Also averted with Anubis' Kull Warriors, whose armour was friggin' invincible to pretty much all the conventional weapons the Tau'ri could bring to bear, even heavy explosives. However, like kevlar, it does little to stop a dart gun with a needle small enough to go between the weaves.



* In ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' armor is the ''easiest'' way to get higher Armor Class, but it tops out at a certain point, and using the really heavy armor [[MightyGlacier comes with drawbacks]] -- including penalties to many physical actions. Some characters are prohibited from using their special powers while wearing armor that is too heavy, or wearing any armor at all. In versions 3.0 and beyond, armor is also judged worthless when determining whether "touch attack" spells hit, which generally confer the most devastating effects in the game. Ultimately there are many magical alternatives to armor that will increase your Armor Class at a greater cost, but without all the drawbacks.
** Monks in particular embody this trope since they lose almost all of their abilities if they put on anything heavier than a wool shirt. Additionally, they gain a bonus to Armour Class based on their Wisdom and level. It is fairly easy, magic aside, for a monk to quickly outstrip even the heaviest armoured fighters.
** In the 3.5 Edition, many players feel that Armor Class itself, encompassing all types of defense, is useless because most monsters have a high probability of hitting you anyway, due to their huge Base Attack Bonuses granted by racial hit dice, their often enormous strength, and the fact that their natural attacks do not follow the same degradation formula that weapon users do. It does limit the extent of Power Attack that can be levied against players and certain creatures do make extensive use of weapons, meaning that their last few hits have a lowered chance of hitting you, but it doesn't change the fact that against anyone who doesn't use weapons will tear a player character apart and there's nothing his or her armor can do about it. Players ultimately discovered that [[TheLawOfDiminishingDefensiveEffort the best defense is a good offense]], sacrificing Armor Class for the sake of increased attack power, effectively turning most characters into {{Glass Cannon}}s.
*** {{Exploited}} in the 3.5 rulebook ''Drow of the Underdark'', which contains a comment that in drow culture, {{Stripperiffic}} outfits are considered a mark of confidence. In other words, you're not wearing heavy armor (or much else) in order show off a body unscarred by attacks, as your magic provides all the protection you could possibly need.
** As early as level 7 (of 20), the right combination of magical effects (decoys and percentile "miss chance" rolls) can provide just as much protection as an arbitrarily high armor class. These effects are most readily available to Sorcerers and Wizards, the characters who suffer the most from wearing actual armor.
** With 4e armor becomes more of a relative thing because characters add half their level to their armor class while adding half their level to their chance to hit. While it can create problems, it tends to nicely simulate films of the fantasy genre: Achilles in ''Troy'' can wade through soldiers by slashing throats and otherwise finding the weak spots in their armor, while Aragorn and Legolas don't get hit during a mass melee despite their light armor.
*** Additionally, if a character is wearing light or no armor they can add their DEX ''or'' their INT bonus to their armor class. So now Gandalf, even as a 5th level wizard, is all but impossible to hit for orcs due to his awesome intelligence.
*** At the very high levels, a character who wears no armor (and uses Dex or Int to boost AC) will eventually outpace the heavily-armored characters. Various fixes have been created and proposed to fix this issue.
*** Also, not to forget, 4e Essentials allows a Warlock to wear Chainmail without any kind of backdraw in battle.
** In D&D in general, there is a rule about heavy armor and sleep. If a character sleeps while wearing heavy armor, he'll wake up more exhausted than when he went to sleep.
*** Which is [[TruthInTelevision truth in television]], as any armor is not designed for comfort at the best of times and is downright ''uncomfortable'' when lying down. You don't sleep well wearing it.
** Armor in D&D 3 ed. is essentially this. In reality, heavy armour provides protection at a expense of mobility. In D&D armor protects the character from being hit but does nothing to attacks that connected. It also places a cap on dexterity bonus rendering the character easier to hit. It means that very nimble character is usually better off not wearing most armors. Which is peculiar as D&D 3 ed. incorporates mechanics for non-armor damage reduction.
*** A smart DM may avert that version by a describing failed enemy attack roll on a heavily armored target as "the blow bounces off harmlessly" or some such. In fact, that's the entire ''idea'' of touch attacks -- some spells and other effects only need to hit at all to take effect, and so ignore armor, while most actual weapons need to hit well enough to ''not'' just bounce off harmlessly. Hence, the difference between Touch AC and ordinary AC is a range where you were hit but the armour protected you.
* One of the official ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' supplements has a barbarian variant that grants the ability "Naked Courage." It grants the character a bonus to AC when not wearing armour. Granted, it's a fairly small bonus.
** ''Pathfinder'' also published the "NPC Codex", which provides official stats for the game's iconic characters. With her spells running, Seoni (the sorceress in the slinky red dress) officially has a better armor class than any of the heavy-armor wearing melee characters.

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* In ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' armor is the ''easiest'' way to get higher Armor Class, but it has a number of drawbacks depending on the version:
** The trope does not apply in the first and second editions, where armor is one of the few ways to increase your Armor Class and make your character more difficult to hit. Further, it provides few drawbacks.
** In 3.0 and 3.5 editions, armor
tops out at a certain point, and using the really heavy armor [[MightyGlacier comes with drawbacks]] -- including penalties to many physical actions.actions, decreased movement speed and penalties for sleeping in it. Some characters are prohibited from using their special powers while wearing armor that is too heavy, or wearing any armor at all. In versions 3.0 and beyond, armor Armor is also judged worthless when determining whether "touch attack" spells hit, which generally confer the most devastating effects in the game. Ultimately there are many magical alternatives to armor that will increase your Armor Class at a greater cost, but or make you more difficult to hit without all the many of these drawbacks.
** Monks in particular embody this trope since they lose almost all of their abilities if they put on anything heavier than a wool shirt. Additionally, they gain a bonus to Armour Class based on their Wisdom and level. It is fairly easy, magic aside, for a monk to quickly outstrip even 4th edition reduces the heaviest armoured fighters.
** In the 3.5 Edition, many players feel that Armor Class itself, encompassing all types
importance of defense, is useless because most monsters have a high probability of hitting you anyway, due to their huge Base Attack Bonuses granted by racial hit dice, their often enormous strength, and the fact that their natural attacks do not follow the same degradation formula that weapon users do. It does limit the extent of Power Attack that can be levied against players and certain creatures do make extensive use of weapons, meaning that their last few hits have a lowered chance of hitting you, but it doesn't change the fact that against anyone who doesn't use weapons will tear a player character apart and there's nothing his or her armor can do about it. Players ultimately discovered that [[TheLawOfDiminishingDefensiveEffort the best defense is a good offense]], sacrificing Armor Class for the sake of increased attack power, effectively turning most characters into {{Glass Cannon}}s.
*** {{Exploited}} in the 3.5 rulebook ''Drow of the Underdark'', which contains a comment that in drow culture, {{Stripperiffic}} outfits are considered a mark of confidence. In other words, you're not wearing heavy armor (or much else) in order show off a body unscarred
by attacks, as your magic provides all the protection you could possibly need.
** As early as level 7 (of 20), the right combination of magical effects (decoys and percentile "miss chance" rolls) can provide just as much protection as an arbitrarily high armor class. These effects are most readily available to Sorcerers and Wizards, the characters who suffer the most from wearing actual armor.
** With 4e armor becomes more of a relative thing because
having characters add half their level to their armor class while adding half their level to their chance class. This means that high-level characters are still more difficult to hit. While it can create problems, it tends to nicely simulate films of the fantasy genre: Achilles in ''Troy'' can wade through soldiers by slashing throats and otherwise finding the weak spots in their armor, while Aragorn and Legolas don't get hit during a mass melee despite their light armor.
*** Additionally,
Further, if a character is wearing light or no armor they can add their DEX ''or'' their INT bonus to their armor class. So now Gandalf, even as a 5th level wizard, is all but impossible to hit for orcs due to his awesome intelligence.
*** At the very high levels, a character who wears no armor (and uses Dex or Int to boost AC) will eventually outpace the heavily-armored characters. Various fixes have been created and proposed to fix
All of this issue.
*** Also, not to forget, 4e Essentials allows a Warlock to wear Chainmail without any kind of backdraw in battle.
** In D&D in general, there is a rule about heavy armor and sleep. If a character sleeps while wearing heavy armor, he'll wake up more exhausted than when he went to sleep.
*** Which is [[TruthInTelevision truth in television]], as any armor is not designed for comfort at the best of times and is downright ''uncomfortable'' when lying down. You don't sleep well wearing it.
** Armor in D&D 3 ed. is essentially this. In reality, heavy armour provides protection at a expense of mobility. In D&D armor protects the character from being hit but does nothing to attacks that connected. It also places a cap on dexterity bonus rendering the character easier to hit. It
means that very nimble character is usually better off not wearing most armors. Which is peculiar as D&D 3 ed. incorporates mechanics for non-armor damage reduction.
*** A smart DM may avert that version by a describing failed enemy attack roll on a heavily armored target as "the blow bounces off harmlessly" or some such. In fact, that's the entire ''idea'' of touch
high-level characters can evade attacks -- some spells and other effects only need to hit at all to take effect, and so ignore armor, while most actual weapons need to hit well enough to ''not'' just bounce off harmlessly. Hence, the difference between Touch AC and ordinary AC is a range where you were hit but the armour protected you.
even when lightly armored.
* One of the official ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' supplements uses a system based on the D20 system of ''Dungeons and Dragons'', so it has all the same examples. It also riffs on the trope in a number of additional ways:
** There is
a barbarian variant that grants the ability "Naked Courage." It grants the character a bonus to AC when not wearing armour. Granted, it's a fairly small bonus.
** ''Pathfinder'' also published In the "NPC Codex", ''NPC Codex'', which provides official stats for the game's iconic characters. With her spells running, characters, Seoni (the sorceress in the slinky red dress) officially has a better armor class with her spells running than any of the heavy-armor wearing melee characters.



** In ''TabletopGame/StarWarsSagaEdition'', characters gain bonuses to their Reflex Defense (the defense that keeps blaster bolts hitting you) from armor or a [[StatisticallySpeaking level-based bonus]], and they don't stack. At higher levels, it's better to go into a fight naked, rather than wearing the heaviest protection you can find. However, it isn't played completely straight as the bonuses to Fortitude Defense from armor do stack and with the right talents, you can get them to stack with the Reflex Defense as well.
* One of the most notable examples in the ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' background is the standard issue flak armour of the Imperial Guard - a bulletproof, heat and shrapnel resistant uniform with potentially extra armoured-areas by our standards... that is generally useless against most of the weaponry of the other species within ''Warhammer 40,000''. The PoweredArmor worn by the SpaceMarine Mascots, on the other hand, is generally an aversion. Most weapons have a better than even chance of bouncing off harmlessly, and the even more powerful Terminator Armor is protection against anything short of Heavy Anti-tank weaponry or plasma weapons, and for dealing with such weapons, [[LuckilyMyShieldWillProtectMe Storm Shields]] and [[DeflectorShields the built in energy shield]] of terminator armor still provide reasonable protection.
** Admitedly, the weaponry used by other species includes, but is not limited to, [[{{BFG}} armor-piercing rocket-propelled grenades]], [[AbsurdlySharpBlade mono-edged high-speed shurikens]], [[AbnormalAmmo armored flesh-eating acidic worms]] or [[EnergyWeapon droplets of superheated plasma]]. And that's just what the line infantry uses. Specialists and other elites can, and often do, pack much deadlier weaponry. On the other hand, flak armor provides quite decent protection against lasbolts, bullets (even high-caliber ones) and most conventional melee weapons and its one of the best armors available to starting characters in the [[Literature/DarkHeresy RPG]] Unfortunately in the tabletop game, the only faction to use such weapons is usually the Imperial Guard themselves. Granted though, in 40k lore the Imperial Guard is usually fighting traitorous planetary defense forces or Imperial Guard regiments turned to Chaos.
** Flak armour probably also at least offers a degree of protection against shrapnel, [[TruthInTelevision which in real life]] is one of the modern battlefield's biggest killers and the reason why soldiers still wear armour even though it is not proof against standard small arms.
** The Imperial Guard are intentionally a RedshirtArmy, so they follow several tropes of skilled and decently equipped soldiers being useless. Medium and high levels of armor provide good protection, but light armor is penetrated by the basic weapons, not to mention heavy and armor piercing ones.
*** However, this is the flak armor worn by Cadian-style "standard" IG forces. IG regiments from Catachan (an entire planet of Rambo wannabes) are given the same armor value, even though each and every one of them eschew the physical armor to go in shirtless and wearing apparently standard issue red headbands. The logical conclusion here is that their armor save is derived entirely from their ''sheer masculinity''.

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** * In ''TabletopGame/StarWarsSagaEdition'', characters gain bonuses to their Reflex Defense (the defense that keeps blaster bolts hitting you) from armor or a [[StatisticallySpeaking level-based bonus]], and they don't stack. At higher levels, it's better to go into a fight naked, rather than wearing the heaviest protection you can find. However, it isn't played completely straight as the bonuses to Fortitude Defense from armor do stack and with the right talents, you can get them to stack with the Reflex Defense as well.
* One of the most notable examples in the ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' background is the ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'':
** The
standard issue flak armour of the Imperial Guard - a bulletproof, heat and shrapnel resistant uniform with potentially extra armoured-areas by our standards... that is generally useless against most of the weaponry of the other species within ''Warhammer 40,000''. The PoweredArmor worn by the SpaceMarine Mascots, on the other hand, It's fan nickname is generally an aversion. Most weapons have a better than even chance of bouncing off harmlessly, and the even more powerful Terminator Armor is protection against anything short of Heavy Anti-tank weaponry or plasma weapons, and for dealing with such weapons, [[LuckilyMyShieldWillProtectMe Storm Shields]] and [[DeflectorShields the built in energy shield]] of terminator armor still provide reasonable protection.
** Admitedly, the weaponry used by other species includes, but is not limited to, [[{{BFG}} armor-piercing rocket-propelled grenades]], [[AbsurdlySharpBlade mono-edged high-speed shurikens]], [[AbnormalAmmo armored flesh-eating acidic worms]] or [[EnergyWeapon droplets of superheated plasma]]. And that's just what the line infantry uses. Specialists and other elites can, and often do, pack much deadlier weaponry. On the other hand, flak armor provides quite decent protection against lasbolts, bullets (even high-caliber ones) and most conventional melee weapons and its one of the best armors available to starting characters in the [[Literature/DarkHeresy RPG]] Unfortunately in the tabletop game, the only faction to use such weapons is usually the Imperial Guard themselves. Granted though, in 40k lore the Imperial Guard is usually fighting traitorous planetary defense forces or Imperial Guard regiments turned to Chaos.
** Flak armour probably also at least offers a degree of protection against shrapnel, [[TruthInTelevision which in real life]] is one of the modern battlefield's biggest killers and the reason why soldiers still wear armour even though it is not proof against standard small arms.
** The Imperial Guard are intentionally a RedshirtArmy, so they follow several tropes of skilled and decently equipped soldiers being useless. Medium and high levels of armor provide good protection, but light armor is penetrated by the basic weapons, not to mention heavy and armor piercing ones.
*** However, this is the flak armor worn by Cadian-style "standard" IG forces. IG regiments from Catachan (an entire planet of Rambo wannabes) are given the same armor value, even though each and every one of them eschew the physical armor to go in shirtless and wearing apparently standard issue red headbands. The logical conclusion here is that their armor save is derived entirely from their ''sheer masculinity''.
"the T-shirt/"



* In ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'', averted at the low levels, as good armor vastly increases your survival chance in a fight--aside from the fact that the rules specifically state that the only reason to wear [[HelmetsAreHardlyHeroic a helmet]] is if you don't think your hairstyle is [[RuleOfCool cool enough]]. Played straight at high levels, as there are enough MartialArtsAndCrafts abilities that only need to touch you to mess you up in ways ranging from petrification to ''having your soul fall off'' that characters will mostly be depending on magically-powered defenses, rendering armor somewhat redundant. Armour is a lot more useful with the 2.5 revisions, which halved the cost in Artifact dots for a decent suit and reduced weapon damage across the board. It's still vulnerable to bad-touch effects, though.
** in the 3rd edition, armor has become viable again, and stacks with the Resistance skills. However, most Martial Arts don't function with armor on.
* Armor in ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' very roughly mirrors the rise and fall in armor usefulness in reality, with available armor playing catch up early in each TL. This ceases to be the case at TL 12 where you can buy guns that delete people from reality, which renders armor rather pointless. In 4th Edition ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}: Spaceships'' the rules have led to the comparison "eggshells armed with hammers".
** When you reach TL 9, PowerArmor start appearing. This type of armor's true strength is to turn choosing between dodging and DR a FalseDichotomy: PowerArmor will stop small arms fire or fragmentation damage while still allowing you to dodge heavier rounds.
* Averted in ''TabletopGame/TheWitcherGameOfImagination'', but it still heavily depends who or what are you facing. When fighting humans and humanoids, armour can be very useful, going so far as to make a character almost invulnerable. It takes a considerable effort to harm in any way a person wearing full-body plate armour, especially when they are mounted and[=/=]or with a shield. On the other hand, bigger predators and monsters deal so much damage that armour won't even stop the fixed part of it, not to mention the outcome of damage rolls. But given how rare such enemies are, the final consensus among players is to wear as much armour as possible - when your enemies deal on average d6+4 damage and armour resists 8 of it, it's a no-brainer.

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* In ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'', averted at the low levels, as good armor vastly increases your survival chance in a fight--aside from the fact that the rules specifically state that the only reason to wear [[HelmetsAreHardlyHeroic a helmet]] is if you don't think your hairstyle is [[RuleOfCool cool enough]]. Played straight at high levels, as there are enough MartialArtsAndCrafts abilities that only need to touch you to mess you up in ways ranging from petrification to ''having your soul fall off'' that characters will mostly be depending on magically-powered defenses, rendering armor somewhat redundant. Armour is a lot more useful with the 2.5 revisions, which halved the cost in Artifact dots for a decent suit and reduced weapon damage across the board. It's still vulnerable to bad-touch effects, though.
** in
though. In the 3rd edition, however, armor has become viable again, and stacks with the Resistance skills. However, most Martial Arts don't function with armor on.
* Armor in ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' very roughly mirrors the rise and fall in armor usefulness in reality, with available armor playing catch up early in each TL. This ceases to be the case at TL 12 where you can buy guns that delete people from reality, which renders armor rather pointless. In 4th Edition ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}: Spaceships'' the rules have led to the comparison "eggshells armed with hammers".
**
hammers". When you reach TL 9, PowerArmor start appearing. This type of armor's true strength is to turn choosing between dodging and DR a FalseDichotomy: PowerArmor will stop small arms fire or fragmentation damage while still allowing you to dodge heavier rounds.
* Averted in ''TabletopGame/TheWitcherGameOfImagination'', but it still heavily depends who or what are you facing. When fighting humans and humanoids, armour can be very useful, going so far as to make a character almost invulnerable. It takes a considerable effort to harm in any way a person wearing full-body plate armour, especially when they are mounted and[=/=]or with a shield. On the other hand, bigger predators and monsters deal so much damage that armour won't even stop the fixed part of it, not to mention the outcome of damage rolls. But given how rare such enemies are, the final consensus among players is to wear as much armour as possible - when your enemies deal on average d6+4 damage and armour resists 8 of it, it's a no-brainer.
rounds.
6th Apr '18 1:51:54 PM Zaptech
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* In ''Literature/{{Mistborn}}'', metal armor is extremely useful... for conventional soldiers fighting other soldiers. Against an Allomancer like a Steelpusher or Lurcher, who can repel or pull on metals, metal armor is far less useful, as the the Allomancer can use their powers to knock their enemy off-balance (though Newton's laws are still important; Pushing or Pulling exerts and equal and opposite force on the Allomancer, meaning that Pushing hard enough to throw a human will be just as likely to Push the Allomancer away). On the other hand, a Mistborn, who has access to ''all'' of the powers of Allomancy, wearing armor is actively dangerous, since they can freely Push and Pull in all directions, allowing them to turn anyone wearing metal armor into a living projectile.
6th Apr '18 1:42:59 PM Zaptech
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* Subverted and [[PlayingWithATrope played with]] in ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'', where knights wear Shardplate, magitek PoweredArmor capable of shrugging off anything short of a [[AbsurdlySharpBlade Shardblade]] or sustained attacks by almost entire armies. Two knights equipped with full Plate and Blades are able to survive against an army that outnumbered their own greatly for the better part of a day, albeit with horrific casualties among their more conventionally armored allies.

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* Subverted and [[PlayingWithATrope played with]] in ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'', where knights wear Shardplate, magitek PoweredArmor capable of shrugging off anything short of a [[AbsurdlySharpBlade Shardblade]] or sustained attacks by almost entire armies. Two knights equipped with full Plate and Blades are able to survive against an army that outnumbered their own greatly for the better part of a day, albeit with horrific casualties among their more conventionally armored allies. Bringing down someone who is wearing Shardplate is considered such an achievement that it is a widely-honored tradition that the one who killed the Shardbearer gets his weapon and armor as a reward (which also motivates conventional troops to stand up to a Shardbearer in hopes of getting their equipment if they get lucky). However, the only way to kill a Shardbearer through their Plate is to either pound the hell out of them with hammers until a part of the armor wears down and breaks, or to strike through the helmet's eye slit - a tenuous and dangerous proposition against a man towering over you with a sword the length of a polearm that can cut through steel like butter.
6th Apr '18 1:38:06 PM Zaptech
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* ''Franchise/StarWars'': It is often lampshaded that [[https://youtu.be/Vaqq0zGPyHU?t=62 Stormtrooper armor is almost completely useless for protection.]] So far, the only thing the armor has ever canonically stopped is a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2s0a7guIX4 very weak stun weapon.]] Even worse, the [[BlindMistake eyepieces in the helmet actually ''blind'' the user,]] making it [[ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy difficult to shoot straight.]]
** This is seen in ''Film/ANewHope'' as well. At one point during the film, Han Solo and Luke Skywalker stole two sets of Stormtrooper armor to hide among Death Star personnel. (Luke quips "[[LampshadeHanging I can't see a thing in this helmet!]]") As soon as they free Leia and escape the trash compactor, they immediately dispense with the armor. Once its use as camouflage is rendered irrelevant, so is its use as armor.
*** Subverted in the beginning when they're fighting nameless redshirts. Several Stormtroopers are seen getting back up after solid hits, while the rebels are dropping from the shrapnel thrown up by missed shots.
** Fighter DeflectorShields also qualify. Everywhere except the films, an X-Wing's shields can repel TIE fighter lasers for several seconds. Not so in the movies, where the [[OneHitPointWonder X-Wing is destroyed if it's hit squarely ''once''.]] There would be a partial justification for this in ''A New Hope'', where they're told to switch their deflectors on "double front". As anyone who played X-Wing or its successors will point out, this dumps all your shields forward, leaving your rear uncovered. However, this was later followed by another pilot ordering "Stabilize your rear deflectors" when they anticipated a fighter attack... [[{{Jossed}} and the ships still got destroyed in one hit, regardless.]] Further, [[RocketTagGameplay the "double front" explanation falls utterly flat in light of the other films.]]
** This can also apply to deflector shields on capital ships; in the films, when we see ships [[SpaceIsAnOcean broadsiding one another]], their shields seem to do nothing to stop enemy fire (a ''Venator''-class Star Destroyer in ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' has a number of its cannons blasted to pieces by a lucky Separatist shot), and their armor appears to take the hits full on despite the fact that ships that large would most likely have powerful shields.
** In ''Film/RogueOne'', Chirrut Îmwe manages to kick much Stormtrooper ass with ''[[SimpleStaff a staff]]''. On the other hand, it's shown deflecting the Stormtroopers' own rounds.

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* ''Franchise/StarWars'': It is often lampshaded that [[https://youtu.be/Vaqq0zGPyHU?t=62 Stormtrooper armor is almost completely useless for protection.]] So far, the only thing the armor has ever canonically stopped is a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2s0a7guIX4 very weak stun weapon.]] Even worse, the [[BlindMistake eyepieces in the helmet actually ''blind'' the user,]] making it [[ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy difficult to shoot straight.]]
** This is seen in ''Film/ANewHope'' as well. At one point during the film, Han Solo and Luke Skywalker stole two sets of Stormtrooper armor to hide among Death Star personnel. (Luke quips "[[LampshadeHanging I can't see a thing in this helmet!]]") As soon as they free Leia and escape the trash compactor, they immediately dispense with the armor. Once its use as camouflage is rendered irrelevant, so is its use as armor.
*** Subverted in the beginning when they're fighting nameless redshirts. Several Stormtroopers are seen getting back up after solid hits, while the rebels are dropping from the shrapnel thrown up by missed shots.
** Fighter DeflectorShields also qualify. Everywhere except the films, an X-Wing's shields can repel TIE fighter lasers for several seconds. Not so in the movies, where the [[OneHitPointWonder X-Wing is destroyed if it's hit squarely ''once''.]] There would be a partial justification for this in ''A New Hope'', where they're told to switch their deflectors on "double front". As anyone who played X-Wing or its successors will point out, this dumps all your shields forward, leaving your rear uncovered. However, this was later followed by another pilot ordering "Stabilize your rear deflectors" when they anticipated a fighter attack... [[{{Jossed}} and the ships still got destroyed in one hit, regardless.]] Further, [[RocketTagGameplay the "double front" explanation falls utterly flat in light of the other films.]]
** This can also apply to deflector shields on capital ships; in the films, when we see ships [[SpaceIsAnOcean broadsiding one another]], their shields seem to do nothing to stop enemy fire (a ''Venator''-class Star Destroyer in ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' has a number of its cannons blasted to pieces by a lucky Separatist shot), and their armor appears to take the hits full on despite the fact that ships that large would most likely have powerful shields.
** In ''Film/RogueOne'', Chirrut Îmwe manages to kick much Stormtrooper ass with ''[[SimpleStaff a staff]]''. On the other hand, it's shown deflecting the Stormtroopers' own rounds.
6th Apr '18 1:35:22 PM Zaptech
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* Averted in ''Series/{{Firefly}}''. In the pilot, Zoe wears a bulletproof vest to the meeting with Patience, expecting violence to ensue. When it inevitably does, she takes a bullet to the chest and is knocked flat and apparently unconscious for a couple minutes, but is otherwise unwounded. In [[Film/{{Serenity}} the movie]], the Operative likewise wears full body armor to his meeting with Mal, and it likewise saves his life when Mal loses his temper. Seemingly played straight in the flashback to the Unification War in the pilot when Mal shoots an armored Alliance soldier. Under closer analysis it's muddier: Mal fired several shots before the guy fell over, and he was using a full size assault rifle. Also, given that the Alliance equips its troops with body armor as a matter of course, Mal's rifle could have been loaded with armor-piercing rounds. Or the guy might have been knocked unconscious by the impact without the bullets penetrating.

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* Averted in ''Series/{{Firefly}}''. In the pilot, Zoe wears a bulletproof vest to the meeting with Patience, expecting violence to ensue. When it inevitably does, she takes a bullet to the chest and is knocked flat and apparently unconscious for a couple minutes, but is otherwise unwounded. In [[Film/{{Serenity}} the movie]], the Operative likewise wears full body armor to his meeting with Mal, and it likewise saves his life when Mal loses his temper. Seemingly played straight in the flashback to the Unification War in the pilot when Mal shoots an armored Alliance soldier. Under closer analysis it's muddier: Mal fired several shots before the guy fell over, and he was using a full size assault rifle. Also, given that the Alliance equips its troops with body armor as a matter of course, Mal's rifle could have been loaded with armor-piercing rounds. Or the guy might have been knocked unconscious by the impact without the bullets penetrating.
6th Apr '18 1:34:02 PM Zaptech
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** The effectiveness of armor skill is discussed in-universe in various instruction manuals and books. One of the keys to fighting in armor is to not just wear the armor but learn how to move around in the various suits, recognize the resistance in the joints, and understanding how to turn and move so a blow that might hit a weak spot will instead strike unyielding plate.
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