History Main / ArmiesAreEvil

1st Nov '16 5:57:04 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''VideoGame/TheThing2002'': Unsurprisingly, the U.S. army wants to weaponize the Thing. Colonel Whitely event shoots Dr. Faraday when he objects, though it's implied that he was already infected by that point.
25th May '16 11:09:38 AM Preda
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** This gets [[ExaggeratedTrope double ridiculous]] when you play ''as'' one of the Marines in an expansion pack and despite the fact that you never go rogue, other government agents try to kill you anyway. Ostensibly, it's to cover up the incident... but that's what ''you'' were sent there to do in the first place, so it's not like the government has any problem with HECU troops knowing about it. There's basically no reason for them to shoot you, yet they do.
*** Besides, that side effect was due to increasing desperation to cover the events up at Black Mesa: the HECU Marines fail to contain the situation and so pull out; therefore, Black Ops rolls in to wipe out everyone left behind, including HECU stragglers.

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** This gets [[ExaggeratedTrope double ridiculous]] when you play ''as'' one of the Marines in an expansion pack and despite the fact that you never go rogue, other a taskforce of government Black Ops agents try to kill you anyway. Ostensibly, it's to cover up the incident... but you, even though that's what ''you'' were sent there you're supposed to do in be doing. This is explained by the first place, so it's not like the government has any problem with HECU troops knowing about it. There's basically no reason for them to shoot you, yet they do.
*** Besides,
fact that side effect was due to increasing desperation to cover the events up at Black Mesa: the HECU Marines fail failed to contain the situation alien invasion, and eventually retreated altogether, so pull out; therefore, Black Ops rolls moved in with orders to wipe out everyone left behind, [[NukeEm destroy everything, including HECU stragglers.remaining witnesses and Army stragglers]].
19th Mar '16 4:47:02 PM Anddrix
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* The Ottoman army, headed by Mehmed, serves as the main antagonistic force in ''Film/DraculaUntold''. Contrarily, if Vlad even has an army, it is never seen.
29th Feb '16 12:14:07 PM Morgenthaler
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* This trope tends to pop up frequently in the works of George Romero. One of the best known examples is ''TheCrazies'', where the soldiers are idiotic and trigger-happy (not that the armed civilians resisting them were much better though), threaten a scientist with violence when he asks for better facilities, and apparently don't even know the faces of their own men (a scientist that manages to develop a cure is put in a quarantine area while trying to deliver said cure). TheRemake implies that most of the ground forces dont even know what their mission IS, and were literally pulled out of the missions they had been trained for to go on a black ops mission at home.
** ''Film/DayOfTheDead'' had this in spades, with Captain Rhodes being portrayed as an AxCrazy and cowardly scumbag, Steel and Rickles as violent, crude thugs, Miguel as a barely functioning wreck, and the other soldiers as apathetic stoners. Played with slightly in that its clear they (like the rest of the cast) have been driven slowly insane by the Zombie Apocalypse and isolation, and many of them have humanising moments.

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* This trope tends to pop up frequently in the works of George Romero. Romero.
**
One of the best known examples is ''TheCrazies'', ''Film/TheCrazies'', where the soldiers are idiotic and trigger-happy (not that the armed civilians resisting them were much better though), threaten a scientist with violence when he asks for better facilities, and apparently don't even know the faces of their own men (a scientist that manages to develop a cure is put in a quarantine area while trying to deliver said cure). TheRemake implies that most of the ground forces dont even know what their mission IS, and were literally pulled out of the missions they had been trained for to go on a black ops mission at home.
** ''Film/DayOfTheDead'' ''Film/DayOfTheDead1985'' had this in spades, with Captain Rhodes being portrayed as an AxCrazy and cowardly scumbag, Steel and Rickles as violent, crude thugs, Miguel as a barely functioning wreck, and the other soldiers as apathetic stoners. Played with slightly in that its clear they (like the rest of the cast) have been driven slowly insane by the Zombie Apocalypse and isolation, and many of them have humanising moments.



* ''VideoGame/DeadRising'', featuring the standard "scary guys with assault rifles and gas masks who try to kill you to cover up everything" depiction of the U.S. Military that appears in countless other works such as VideoGame/{{Prototype}}, ''VideoGame/HalfLife'', TheCrazies, etc.

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* ''VideoGame/DeadRising'', featuring the standard "scary guys with assault rifles and gas masks who try to kill you to cover up everything" depiction of the U.S. Military that appears in countless other works such as VideoGame/{{Prototype}}, ''VideoGame/HalfLife'', TheCrazies, VideoGame/TheCrazies, etc.
17th Feb '16 1:54:08 AM captainmarkle
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Historically, the English-speaking world has been highly suspicious of ''standing'' armies, especially as opposed to local citizen militias. Standing armies were seen as the tool of distant and oppressive centralizing despots, while local militias defend the rights of the people. As a result, Britain subjected the Army to very tight budgetary scrutiny and tended to keep it small and largely overseas; the US did much the same thing upon independence. This is part of why Britain has a Royal Navy, but not a Royal Army. Eventually, both Britain and the US were forced by the circumstances of history to adopt the conventional model of large standing armies; however, while suspicion of the military has all but disappeared, traces of the old attitude remain in the form of the US protection of the "right to bear arms", and the tradition in both countries of organized, state-supported but locally-controlled militias lives on in the form of [[HomeGuard the National Guard in the US and the Territorial Army in Britain]], as well as the British tradition of tying military units to specific locations. Also historically, people on the rest of the world may well see militaries in this light due to the many, many, MANY military dictatorships that were set up in the interwar period in Europe and in Latin America before and during the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. Turns out setting up a DayOfTheJackboot in your own country isn't good PR.

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Historically, the English-speaking world has been highly suspicious of ''standing'' armies, especially as opposed to local citizen militias. Standing armies were seen as the tool of distant and oppressive centralizing despots, while local militias defend the rights of the people. As a result, Britain subjected the Army to very tight budgetary scrutiny and tended to keep it small and largely overseas; the US did much the same thing upon independence. This is part of why Britain has a Royal Navy, but not a Royal Army. Eventually, both Britain and the US were forced by the circumstances of history to adopt the conventional model of large standing armies; however, while suspicion of the military has all but disappeared, traces of the old attitude remain in the form of the US protection of the "right to bear arms", and the tradition in both countries of organized, state-supported but locally-controlled militias lives on in the form of [[HomeGuard the National Guard in the US and the Territorial Army (now renamed the Army Reserve) in Britain]], as well as the British tradition of tying military units to specific locations. Also historically, people on the rest of the world may well see militaries in this light due to the many, many, MANY military dictatorships that were set up in the interwar period in Europe and in Latin America before and during the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. Turns out setting up a DayOfTheJackboot in your own country isn't good PR.



* In the ''Franchise/StarWars'' prequel trilogy, the Republic initially does not have a military. ''Film/StarWarsAttackOfTheClones'' has Senator Padme Amidala fighting a "Military Creation Act" and being targeted by assassins for it. The creation of the Republic's clone army is ultimately a ploy by Chancellor Palpatine to [[PlayingBothSides manipulate both sides of the war]] and get the Senate to vote him more power. The clones themselves are mostly decent people but that didn't matter once Palpatine [[ManchurianAgent forced]] them to kill all the Jedi.

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* In the ''Franchise/StarWars'' prequel trilogy, the Republic initially does not have a military. ''Film/StarWarsAttackOfTheClones'' has Senator Padme Amidala fighting a "Military Creation Act" and being targeted by assassins for it. The creation of the Republic's clone army is ultimately a ploy by Chancellor Palpatine to [[PlayingBothSides manipulate both sides of the war]] and get the Senate to vote him more power. The clones themselves are mostly decent people but that didn't matter once Palpatine [[ManchurianAgent forced]] them to kill all the Jedi. By the time of ''Film/StarWarsANewHope'', this trope is in full effect.
15th Jan '16 10:56:55 AM Ohio9
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* Every organized armed force is depicted negatively in ''Videgame/TheLastOfUs'', including the US Army before the apocalypse, the FEDRA soldiers after it, and the Firefly resistance forces fighting against them.

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* Every organized armed force is depicted negatively in ''Videgame/TheLastOfUs'', ''Videogame/TheLastOfUs'', including the US Army before the apocalypse, the FEDRA soldiers after it, and the Firefly resistance forces fighting against them.
15th Jan '16 10:55:34 AM Ohio9
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* Every organized armed force is depicted negatively in ''Videgame/TheLastOfUs'', including the US Army before the apocalypse, the FEDRA soldiers after it, and the FireFly resistance forces fighting against them.

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* Every organized armed force is depicted negatively in ''Videgame/TheLastOfUs'', including the US Army before the apocalypse, the FEDRA soldiers after it, and the FireFly Firefly resistance forces fighting against them.
15th Jan '16 10:54:57 AM Ohio9
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* Every organized armed force is depicted negatively in ''Videgame/TheLastOfUs'', including the US Army before the apocalypse, the FEDRA soldiers after it, and the FireFly resistance forces fighting against them.
13th Jan '16 6:32:41 PM UrthWyrm
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* In the ''Franchise/StarWars'' prequel trilogy, the Republic initially does not have a military. ''Film/StarWarsAttackOfTheClones'' has Senator Padme Amidala fighting a "Military Creation Act" and being targeted by assassins for it. The creation of the Republic's clone army is ultimately a ploy by Chancellor Palpatine to [[PlayingBothSides manipulate both sides of the war]] and get the Senate to vote him more power. The clones themselves are mostly decent people but that didn't matter once Palpatine [[ManchurianAgent forced]] them to kill all the Jedi.
31st Dec '15 3:07:28 AM thatmadork
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** Not to mention the [[VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}} Talon Company]] and the [[VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}} Gunners]]. They have their delusions of being an elite crew of pseudo-military mercenaries, but through their ruthless behaviour, they're in reality just a murdering, thieving band of {{Jerkass}} Raiders with better equipment. They'll happily wipe out whole towns full of women and children if it means a job (or sometimes ''[[RapePillageAndBurn just for the sheer hell of it''), they never take prisoners (and conversely never surrender), and they can't be reasoned with. The Gunners aren't even above slavery, trying to buy a child from the [[PlayerCharacter Sole Survivor]] during a quest to return the kid to his parents - if you refuse, they come back and demand the kid ''and'' his parents be handed to them as property.

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** Not to mention the [[VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}} Talon Company]] and the [[VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}} Gunners]]. They have their delusions of being an elite crew of pseudo-military mercenaries, but through their ruthless behaviour, they're in reality just a murdering, thieving band of {{Jerkass}} Raiders with better equipment. They'll happily wipe out whole towns full of women and children if it means a job (or sometimes ''[[RapePillageAndBurn just for the sheer hell of it''), it]]''), they never take prisoners (and conversely never surrender), and they can't be reasoned with. The Gunners aren't even above slavery, trying to buy a child from the [[PlayerCharacter Sole Survivor]] during a quest to return the kid to his parents - if you refuse, they come back and demand the kid ''and'' his parents be handed to them as property.
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