History Main / AndroclesLion

12th Jul '17 4:15:57 AM Astaroth
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** Inverted in "Bart Gets An Elephant": when Bart wins an elephant named Stampy in a radio phone-in contest, Homer quickly finds that's he's too expensive for the family to keep and tries to recoup his losses by selling Stampy to an ivory dealer. However, when he falls into the Springfield tar pits and Stampy rescues him, he decides to donate Stampy to a wildlife preserve instead.
29th Jun '17 8:29:17 AM Espy
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* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. [[AllTakeAndNoGive In the only subversion of this trope]], the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller for having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery, and collects the reward for this information. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, and while the king is brooding in his chambres, whispers to the king that he who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up the goldsmith for his betrayal. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good in fiction or with animals, [[Main/NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness]].

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* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. [[AllTakeAndNoGive In the only subversion of this trope]], the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller for having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery, and collects the reward for this information. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, gravely ill and while cannot be cure by the kingdom's best physicians. While the king is brooding grieving in his chambres, the snake enters and whispers to the king that he only who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The Intrigued and desperate, the king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, queen mother's illness and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up up/executes (depending on the version) the goldsmith for his betrayal. perjury and avarice. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good to note in fiction or with animals, [[Main/NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness]].
29th Jun '17 8:25:35 AM Espy
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* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. In the only subversion of this trope, the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller as having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, and while the king is brooding in his chambres, whispers to the king that he who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up the goldsmith for his betrayal. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good in fiction or with animals, [[Main/NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness]].

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* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. [[AllTakeAndNoGive In the only subversion of this trope, trope]], the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller as for having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery.jewellery, and collects the reward for this information. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, and while the king is brooding in his chambres, whispers to the king that he who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up the goldsmith for his betrayal. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good in fiction or with animals, [[Main/NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness]].
29th Jun '17 8:19:28 AM Espy
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* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. In the only subversion of this trope, the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller as having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, and while the king is brooding in his chambres, whispers to the king that he who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up the goldsmith for his betrayal. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good in fiction or with animals, [[Main/NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness]].



* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. In the only subversion of this trope, the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller as having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, and while the king is brooding in his chambres, whispers to the king that he who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up the goldsmith for his betrayal. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good in fiction or with animals, [[Main/NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness]].
29th Jun '17 8:17:49 AM Espy
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* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. In the only subversion of this trope, the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller as having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, and while the king is brooding in his chambres, whispers to the king that he who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up the goldsmith for his betrayal. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good in fiction or with animals, it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness.

to:

* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. In the only subversion of this trope, the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller as having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, and while the king is brooding in his chambres, whispers to the king that he who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up the goldsmith for his betrayal. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good in fiction or with animals, [[Main/NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness.kindness]].
29th Jun '17 8:15:57 AM Espy
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* In the ''Literature/{{Mahabharata}}'', Yuddhisthra makes it up the mountain to {{Heaven}} (and is indeed the only one of the Pandavas to do so), because he refused to leave behind a dog that followed him. [[spoiler: It turns out the dog is a reincarnation of his father, Dharma.]]

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* In the ''Literature/{{Mahabharata}}'', Yuddhisthra Yudhishtira makes it up the mountain to {{Heaven}} (and is indeed the only one of the Pandavas to do so), because he refused to leave behind a dog that followed him. [[spoiler: It turns out the dog is a reincarnation of his father, Dharma.]]


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* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. In the only subversion of this trope, the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller as having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, and while the king is brooding in his chambres, whispers to the king that he who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up the goldsmith for his betrayal. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good in fiction or with animals, it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness.
3rd Jun '17 9:01:37 AM LordDynasmon
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* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pocho_(crocodile) Pocho]], an American crocodile that was found with a serious head wound, was fed and taken care of by a local fisherman. The crocodile in turn stayed by the fisherman's side, acting not unlike a dog, until it's death.

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* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pocho_(crocodile) Pocho]], an American crocodile that was found with a serious head wound, was fed and taken care of by a local fisherman. The crocodile in turn stayed by the fisherman's side, acting not unlike a dog, until it's its death.
13th May '17 10:02:53 PM Snowsky
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* In the [[{{Website/Reddit}} Reddit]] short story ''[[https://www.reddit.com/r/nosleep/comments/54crn6/the_price_of_sugar/ The Price of Sugar]],'' a woman gets tired of a sentient colony of ants stealing sugar from her kitchen and makes a deal with them, which they agree to: if they stop stealing from her supplies, she will leave a bowl of sugar out for them every day. Her racist neighbor tries to get her thrown out of the apartment building for feeding the ants, and the ants kill him and make his bones into carved pendants for the woman to sell at the local market. As it turns out, they sell for quite a bit of money--"enough to keep my little friends in sugar for a lifetime".

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* In the [[{{Website/Reddit}} Reddit]] short story ''[[https://www.reddit.com/r/nosleep/comments/54crn6/the_price_of_sugar/ The Price of Sugar]],'' a woman poor artist gets tired of a sentient colony of ants stealing sugar from her kitchen and makes a deal with them, which they agree to: if they stop stealing from her supplies, she will leave a bowl of sugar out for them every day. Her racist neighbor tries to get her thrown out of the apartment building for feeding the ants, and the ants kill him and make his bones into carved pendants for the woman to sell at the local market. As it turns out, they sell for quite a bit of money--"enough to keep my little friends in sugar for a lifetime".
13th May '17 10:02:19 PM Snowsky
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* In the [[{{Website/Reddit}} Reddit]] short story ''[[https://www.reddit.com/r/nosleep/comments/54crn6/the_price_of_sugar/ The Price of Sugar]],'' a woman gets tired of a sentient colony of ants stealing sugar from her kitchen and makes a deal with them: if they stop stealing from her supplies, she leaves a bowl of sugar out for them every day. Her racist neighbor tries to get her thrown out of her apartment for feeding ants, and the ants kill him and make his bones into carved pendants for the woman to sell.

to:

* In the [[{{Website/Reddit}} Reddit]] short story ''[[https://www.reddit.com/r/nosleep/comments/54crn6/the_price_of_sugar/ The Price of Sugar]],'' a woman gets tired of a sentient colony of ants stealing sugar from her kitchen and makes a deal with them: them, which they agree to: if they stop stealing from her supplies, she leaves will leave a bowl of sugar out for them every day. Her racist neighbor tries to get her thrown out of her the apartment building for feeding the ants, and the ants kill him and make his bones into carved pendants for the woman to sell.sell at the local market. As it turns out, they sell for quite a bit of money--"enough to keep my little friends in sugar for a lifetime".
23rd Apr '17 10:53:47 AM Ryan37352
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* [[HairRaisingHare The lapins]] in ''Manga/OnePiece''. During the Drum Island arc, Luffy pulls a mother lapin free from the snow after an avalanche. Later, the lapins protect Luffy from attacking villains. [[spoiler: Unfortunately, while allowing Luffy to get his TrueCompanions to safety, they end up viciously beaten for their trouble.]]

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* [[HairRaisingHare The lapins]] in ''Manga/OnePiece''. During the Drum Island arc, Luffy pulls a mother lapin free from the snow after an avalanche. Later, the lapins protect Luffy from the attacking villains. [[spoiler: Unfortunately, while allowing Luffy to get his TrueCompanions to safety, they end up viciously beaten for their trouble.]]



** Also, when the Team Rocket scientist Dr. Namba kidnapped Lugia's child in order to capture the parent, Ash and his entourage, along with James and Jesse (who sympathized with it) helped rescue the young Pokémon, and the adult Lugia later became an AndroclesLion towards all of them.

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** Also, when the Team Rocket scientist Dr. Namba kidnapped Lugia's child in order to capture the parent, Ash and his entourage, along with James and Jesse Jessie (who sympathized with it) helped rescue the young Pokémon, and the adult Lugia later became an AndroclesLion towards all of them.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AndroclesLion