History Main / AndroclesLion

20th Sep '17 12:39:51 PM HeraldAlberich
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* In the Korean film ''Film/ThePirates'', the characters all hunt a large whale that has swallowed a very important royal seal. The pirate captain, however, hesitates to kill it, and when she is defeated by her rival and tossed overboard, a flashback reveals that when she was a young fish-diving girl and the whale was a calf, she rescued it from a net. The whale recognizes her by the sound of the small bell she still wears on her wrist, and carries her to safety.
19th Aug '17 5:19:38 PM ElSquibbonator
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** In particular, Pikachu warmed to Ash (and saved his butt) when Ash [[GoThroughMe protected him]] from a flock of pissed-off Spearow.

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** In particular, Pikachu warmed to Ash (and saved his butt) when Ash [[GoThroughMe protected him]] from a flock of pissed-off Spearow. However, Pikachu already belonged to Ash at this point.
15th Aug '17 2:57:43 AM MeepieV
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*Mentioned as a throwaway gag on ''WesternAnimation/BobsBurgers''. Tina rescues a sea urchin by pushing it back into the sea with her foot, and both Gene and Tina are absolutely convinced it will repay the favour someday.
28th Jul '17 11:55:49 AM creader
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* Played with in ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' with Lapis Lazuli. Steven befriends Lapis and frees her from the mirror she'd been imprisoned in for 5000 years, and healed her cracked Gem so she could fly home. Since that point, she has helped and/or saved Steven several times, usually at immense personal risk.



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26th Jul '17 5:44:54 PM ElSquibbonator
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* Subverted (and double subverted) in a classic joke. A man saves an elephant with a thorn in its foot. The elephant takes a long look at the man and the hurries off. Some years later, the man sees the elephant in a local circus. Since elephants never forget, the man decides to enter into the elephant's enclosure to comfort his old friend the elephant. He is promptly crushed to death, at which point the narrator usually points out that [[ShaggyDogStory it was probably not the same elephant]].

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* Subverted (and double subverted) in a classic joke. A man saves an elephant with a thorn in its foot. The elephant takes a long look at the man and the hurries off. Some years later, the man sees the elephant in a local circus. Since elephants never forget, the man decides to enter into the elephant's enclosure to comfort his old friend the elephant. He is promptly crushed to death, death (or, in some versions, simply thrown out of the enclosure), at which point the narrator usually points out that [[ShaggyDogStory it was probably not the same elephant]].
12th Jul '17 4:15:57 AM Astaroth
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** Inverted in "Bart Gets An Elephant": when Bart wins an elephant named Stampy in a radio phone-in contest, Homer quickly finds that's he's too expensive for the family to keep and tries to recoup his losses by selling Stampy to an ivory dealer. However, when he falls into the Springfield tar pits and Stampy rescues him, he decides to donate Stampy to a wildlife preserve instead.
29th Jun '17 8:29:17 AM Espy
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* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. [[AllTakeAndNoGive In the only subversion of this trope]], the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller for having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery, and collects the reward for this information. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, and while the king is brooding in his chambres, whispers to the king that he who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up the goldsmith for his betrayal. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good in fiction or with animals, [[Main/NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness]].

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* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. [[AllTakeAndNoGive In the only subversion of this trope]], the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller for having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery, and collects the reward for this information. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, gravely ill and while cannot be cure by the kingdom's best physicians. While the king is brooding grieving in his chambres, the snake enters and whispers to the king that he only who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The Intrigued and desperate, the king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, queen mother's illness and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up up/executes (depending on the version) the goldsmith for his betrayal. perjury and avarice. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good to note in fiction or with animals, [[Main/NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness]].
29th Jun '17 8:25:35 AM Espy
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* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. In the only subversion of this trope, the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller as having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, and while the king is brooding in his chambres, whispers to the king that he who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up the goldsmith for his betrayal. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good in fiction or with animals, [[Main/NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness]].

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* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. [[AllTakeAndNoGive In the only subversion of this trope, trope]], the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller as for having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery.jewellery, and collects the reward for this information. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, and while the king is brooding in his chambres, whispers to the king that he who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up the goldsmith for his betrayal. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good in fiction or with animals, [[Main/NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness]].
29th Jun '17 8:19:28 AM Espy
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* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. In the only subversion of this trope, the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller as having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, and while the king is brooding in his chambres, whispers to the king that he who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up the goldsmith for his betrayal. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good in fiction or with animals, [[Main/NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness]].



* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. In the only subversion of this trope, the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller as having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, and while the king is brooding in his chambres, whispers to the king that he who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up the goldsmith for his betrayal. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good in fiction or with animals, [[Main/NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness]].
29th Jun '17 8:17:49 AM Espy
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* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. In the only subversion of this trope, the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller as having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, and while the king is brooding in his chambres, whispers to the king that he who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up the goldsmith for his betrayal. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good in fiction or with animals, it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness.

to:

* A Pañcatantra story has a traveller come across a well in a jungle, inside which are trapped a tiger, monkey, snake and man. He helps out the four of them, who swear to repay the debt someday. Some time later, as he is crossing a mountain, he comes across a tiger which to his surprise does not attack him. He recognises the tiger to be the one he helped out of a well, and in return she feeds him and gives him a golden necklace from her den. On the way to the capital city, he is waylaid in a forest by bandits who tie him up, take his valuables and set up camp there for the night. The monkey, who lives in the forest, comes to know about this, and comes to the travellers's rescue. He throws away the bandits' weapons, restores to the traveller his valuables and frightens the bandits away by summoning his friends, who throw rocks and stones at the bandits. The traveller then makes it to the city where he meets the goldsmith, and asks him to appraise the necklace given by the tiger. The goldsmith recognises the necklace as one owned by the missing princess of the kingdom, and upon learning that the tiger was the one who had the necklace, deduces that the tiger must have killed and eaten the princess. In the only subversion of this trope, the goldsmith goes to the king with the necklace and indicts the traveller as having killed the princess and stolen her jewellery. The king has the traveller locked up and scheduled for execution. In his jail cell, he hears a whispering noise and looks up to see the snake he helped out of the well in the jungle. The snake, having heard everything, gives the traveller an herb with instruction on how to use it. The snake then bites the king's mother, who becomes deeply ill, and while the king is brooding in his chambres, whispers to the king that he who was wrongfully imprisoned can cure the king's mother. The king summons the traveller, who uses the herb to relieve the lady's illness, and explains his side of the story to the king, who locks up the goldsmith for his betrayal. The moral of the story is that while this trope is well and good in fiction or with animals, [[Main/NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished it is unrealistic to expect fellow humans to repay kindness with kindness.kindness]].
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