History Main / AmoralAttorney

4th Jan '18 9:42:13 PM KenMoreau
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* In W.E.B. Griffin's "Men In Blue" series, this is averted with Armando Giacomo. He is known as the Mob's Attorney, as he defends (frequently successfully, which is often noted by his detractors) many members of the Mafia. But he justifies this practice by noting (as above) that everyone deserves a strong defense. And the police do not hold this against him, as he uses the high fees he charges the Mafia to (again, frequently) do pro bono work for police officers who are charged with a crime and whom he judges need his skills but could not possibly afford him.
1st Jan '18 9:46:15 PM AgentKyles
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See also EvilLawyerJoke, which originated by how widespread this kind of attorney is in fiction.

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See also EvilLawyerJoke, which originated by how widespread this kind of attorney is in fiction. \n To meet his opponent, see CrusadingLawyer.
24th Dec '17 6:36:07 PM neoYTPism
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*** And the video linked was taken down, [[{{Irony}} courtesy of Fox's lawyers]].

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*** And the video linked was taken down, [[{{Irony}} [[IResembleThatRemark courtesy of Fox's lawyers]].
29th Nov '17 1:54:22 PM mavacca
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* Played with in Hugh Lang, Whip's attorney, in ''Film/{{Flight}}''. While he quashes Whip's toxicology report with a technicality, despite the fact that he knew it was very much accurate, and casually mentions that the dead flight crew members "don't matter" (due to workers' compensation) he shows open disgust with Whip the first moment they meet regarding his behavior, and back tracks after the "don't matter" comment, saying he meant that legally, the airline is not at risk from them.
* The senior lawyers and lawmakers in the ''Film/LegallyBlonde'' movies and novels. In the musical, one of them even gets Blood in the Water, a VillainSong explaining the Amoral Attorney POV.



* ''Film/LittleSweetheart'' gives this as an upside that [[spoiler:they killed Robert Burger, seeing as they don't gotta pay a public defender, clearly thinking very little of said defender, as he would have defended a bank robber and accused child murderer (he's innocent).]]

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* ''Film/LittleSweetheart'' gives this as an upside that [[spoiler:they killed Robert Burger, seeing as they don't gotta pay a public defender, clearly thinking very little James Donovan's colleagues in ''Film/BridgeOfSpies'', who seem more interested in creating the ''illusion'' of said defender, as he would have defended a bank robber and defense for accused child murderer (he's innocent).]]Soviet spy Rudolf Abel than actually defending him. The East German attorney Wolfgang Vogel is even worse (combining this trope with HistoricalVillainUpgrade), since he's keeping a man he knows to be innocent solely to help East Germany get a leg up in the Soviet hierarchy.
* A main theme of Literature/ACivilAction is that amorality is a necessary quality of successful lawyers, because becoming too involved in their clients’ personal tragedies may cloud their judgment and make them less effective. This is initially played straight in that the most amoral and competent attorney wins [[spoiler: even if his client is guilty]], but eventually subverted with the main charachter, who proudly states that [[spoiler: even if at the end he is financially ruined]] taking the case has made him a better man.
* ''Film/{{Conspiracy}}'' has perhaps one of the worst examples. During the Wannsee Conference, during which the FinalSolution to the [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Jewish question was devised]], several key participants were lawyers. Including members of the Justice Ministry. The most revolting one (who's also a lawyer) throws in an EvilLawyerJoke for good measure.
* ''Film/DeepCover'': David Jason (Jeff Goldblum) is a drug lawyer who dreams of setting up his own operation producing synthetic drugs.
* An InvokedTrope in ''Film/TheDevilsAdvocate''. Satan himself runs an entire corrupt legal office with global connections, composed of immoral humans and his own demons, as part of a plot to drive the world to apocalypse by providing every CardCarryingVillain in the world with [[OffOnATechnicality the best legal assistance in existence]]. An explicit example is the [[VillainProtagonist protagonist]], Kevin Lomax: while he does retains some moral qualms against defending a pedophile in the beginning of the movie, he more or less completely eschews them and becomes this trope. [[spoiler:After he defeats the devil and is revived, he loses the "amoral", and risks disbarment to expose his pedophile client]].
* Played with in Hugh Lang, Whip's attorney, in ''Film/{{Flight}}''. While he quashes Whip's toxicology report with a technicality, despite the fact that he knew it was very much accurate, and casually mentions that the dead flight crew members "don't matter" (due to workers' compensation) he shows open disgust with Whip the first moment they meet regarding his behavior, and back tracks after the "don't matter" comment, saying he meant that legally, the airline is not at risk from them.



* The senior lawyers and lawmakers in the ''Film/LegallyBlonde'' movies and novels. In the musical, one of them even gets Blood in the Water, a VillainSong explaining the Amoral Attorney POV.
* ''Film/LittleSweetheart'' gives this as an upside that [[spoiler:they killed Robert Burger, seeing as they don't gotta pay a public defender, clearly thinking very little of said defender, as he would have defended a bank robber and accused child murderer (he's innocent).]]



* ''Film/{{Se7en}}'', a movie about a SerialKiller who takes his inspiration from the SevenDeadlySins, uses a lawyer as the victim for greed. As the killer tells the detectives, "You guys must have been secretly thanking me for that one!"
** The killer's own attorney appears at one point and appears less than thrilled to be working for ''this'' client, but does his job negotiating on behalf of his client (even using the leverage of bad PR for the police if they refuse to deal when there are more unknown victims out there).
* An InvokedTrope in ''Film/TheDevilsAdvocate''. Satan himself runs an entire corrupt legal office with global connections, composed of immoral humans and his own demons, as part of a plot to drive the world to apocalypse by providing every CardCarryingVillain in the world with [[OffOnATechnicality the best legal assistance in existence]]. An explicit example is the [[VillainProtagonist protagonist]], Kevin Lomax: while he does retains some moral qualms against defending a pedophile in the beginning of the movie, he more or less completely eschews them and becomes this trope. [[spoiler:After he defeats the devil and is revived, he loses the "amoral", and risks disbarment to expose his pedophile client]].



* In ''Film/ScannersIITheNewOrder'', Commander Forrester makes himself a public favorite by dispatching a corrupt lawyer who works for drug kingpins.



* ''Film/{{Conspiracy}}'' has perhaps one of the worst examples. During the Wannsee Conference, during which the FinalSolution to the [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Jewish question was devised]], several key participants were lawyers. Including members of the Justice Ministry. The most revolting one (who's also a lawyer) throws in an EvilLawyerJoke for good measure.

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* ''Film/{{Conspiracy}}'' has perhaps In ''Film/ScannersIITheNewOrder'', Commander Forrester makes himself a public favorite by dispatching a corrupt lawyer who works for drug kingpins.
* ''Film/{{Se7en}}'', a movie about a SerialKiller who takes his inspiration from the SevenDeadlySins, uses a lawyer as the victim for greed. As the killer tells the detectives, "You guys must have been secretly thanking me for that one!"
** The killer's own attorney appears at
one point and appears less than thrilled to be working for ''this'' client, but does his job negotiating on behalf of his client (even using the worst examples. During leverage of bad PR for the Wannsee Conference, during which the FinalSolution police if they refuse to the [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Jewish question was devised]], several key participants were lawyers. Including members of the Justice Ministry. The most revolting one (who's also a lawyer) throws in an EvilLawyerJoke for good measure.deal when there are more unknown victims out there).



* James Donovan's colleagues in ''Film/BridgeOfSpies'', who seem more interested in creating the ''illusion'' of a defense for accused Soviet spy Rudolf Abel than actually defending him. The East German attorney Wolfgang Vogel is even worse (combining this trope with HistoricalVillainUpgrade), since he's keeping a man he knows to be innocent solely to help East Germany get a leg up in the Soviet hierarchy.
* ''Film/DeepCover'': David Jason (Jeff Goldblum) is a drug lawyer who dreams of setting up his own operation producing synthetic drugs.
16th Nov '17 12:16:00 AM iroanxi
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* Atty. Benjamin "Ben" Arcinas of ''Literature/SmallerAndSmallerCircles'' certainly counts as one, since he prefers to chase the limelight with sensational cases involving high-profile victims instead of focusing on more important crimes. He almost callously dismisses the Payatas murders and even has a generic street urchin framed for them until the next murder surfaces and bites Arcinas in the ass, seriously jeopardizing his career.
** Oddly enough, he's never shown doing any actual legal work, even as simple as drawing up legal documents; in fact, he plays more of a detective role, albeit a fairly incompetent and self-serving one. (TruthInTelevision, as Philippine lawyers are often appointed to various government posts, at times even to positions far beyond their strict area of legal expertise and often regardless of their actual administrative ability.)
14th Nov '17 9:56:30 AM CaptainTedium
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* ''WesternAnimation/BikerMiceFromMars'' featured a Plutarkian lawyer named Perry Provolone as a minor villain.

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* ''WesternAnimation/BikerMiceFromMars'' featured a Plutarkian lawyer named Perry Provolone Provoloni as a minor villain.
11th Nov '17 3:20:31 AM Ramidel
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* Igland of the Swift Sword in ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'' is willing to apply InsaneTrollLogic in order to secure a conviction, doesn't care if there are mitigating factors, and begins screaming about bribery should you succeed. Your character is permitted to ''commit out-and-out bribery and corruption'' in order to get him off. After you finish the trial, [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption relationships between the victim's culture and the defendant's tribe get worse no matter what happened]].
** His statement is essentially that "the defendent is a dirty savage and therefore we should hang him." Despite the apparent lack of legal precedent for this tactic, Igland claims never to have lost a case before.

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* Igland of the Swift Sword in ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'' is willing to apply InsaneTrollLogic in order to secure a conviction, doesn't care if there are mitigating factors, and begins screaming about bribery should you succeed. Your character is permitted to ''commit out-and-out bribery and corruption'' in order to get him off. After you finish the trial, [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption relationships between the victim's culture and the defendant's tribe get worse no matter what happened]].
**
His statement is essentially that "the defendent is a dirty savage and therefore we should hang him." Despite the apparent lack of legal precedent for this tactic, Igland claims never to have lost a case before. Your character is permitted to ''commit out-and-out bribery and corruption'' in order to get the defendant off.
6th Nov '17 7:19:31 AM CaptainTedium
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* ''WesternAnimation/BikerMiceFromMars'' featured a Plutarkian lawyer named Perry Provolone as a minor villain.
5th Nov '17 10:48:25 PM Mortvana
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** The attorneys we actually meet tend to range from common Morally grey (Lindsey [=McDonald=], who seeks power above all else, though maintaining some semblance of conscience) to villains (Holland Manners and Lilah Morgan, who not only strive for power but are capable of sacrificing nearly anything for it).

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** The attorneys we actually meet tend to range from common Morally grey (Lindsey [=McDonald=], who seeks power above all else, though maintaining some semblance of conscience) to villains (Holland Manners and Lilah Morgan, Morgan (although she arguably becomes more morally gray in Season 4[[note]]Being stabbed in the gut after your entire law firm is slaughtered can do that to people[[/note]]), who not only strive for power but are capable of sacrificing nearly anything for it).



* Jeff Winger in ''Series/{{Community}}'' is an unapologetic version of this trope...at least for now. The very fact that he lied about having a college degree is the reason he's at community college in the first place. A colleague of his said the pair (known as Sundance and Tango - they had different partners) were called 'the litter bugs' by prosecutors because they put so much trash back on the streets.

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* Jeff Winger in ''Series/{{Community}}'' is an unapologetic version of this trope...at least for now. The very fact that he lied about having a valid college degree[[note]]He got a law degree from Columbia, now he needs one from America[[/note]] is the reason he's at community college in the first place. A colleague of his said the pair (known as Sundance and Tango - they had different partners) were called 'the litter bugs' by prosecutors because they put so much trash back on the streets.
5th Nov '17 12:13:10 AM LaptopGuy
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Lawyers and Political Science majors other than the main characters are typically opportunistic, unlikeable, arrogant, cynical, slimy, SocialDarwinist {{asshole}}s whose God is Creator/NiccoloMachiavelli. Especially [[CorruptCorporateExecutive the corporate ones]]. Lawyers come in various degrees of oiliness, from slick, two-faced charmers to brutal bullies with a law degree. The worst defense attorneys will actually seem to know that their client is guilty and a total {{sociopath}}, and act as though they just love seeing the wicked go free, and will in fact happily count their money while [[ForTheEvulz the world burns]]. Meanwhile, the worst prosecutors are perverted sadists who will ruthlessly hound and [[BreakingLecture psychologically torture]] defendants, and make them cry like a {{Moe}}blob in public court for all to laugh at, even when they personally acquire knowledge of their complete innocence. If the main character is poor and/or not that intelligent, the Amoral Attorney is the Goliath in the [[DavidVersusGoliath David v. Goliath]] scenario.

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Lawyers and Political Science majors other than the main characters are typically opportunistic, unlikeable, arrogant, cynical, slimy, SocialDarwinist {{asshole}}s whose God is Creator/NiccoloMachiavelli. Especially [[CorruptCorporateExecutive the corporate ones]]. Lawyers come in various degrees of oiliness, from slick, two-faced charmers to brutal bullies with a law degree. The worst defense attorneys will actually seem to know that their client is guilty and a total {{sociopath}}, and act as though they just love seeing the wicked go free, and will in fact happily count their money while [[ForTheEvulz the world burns]]. Meanwhile, the worst prosecutors are perverted sadists who will ruthlessly hound and [[BreakingLecture psychologically torture]] defendants, and make them cry like a {{Moe}}blob in public court for all to laugh at, even when they personally acquire knowledge of their complete innocence. If the main character is poor and/or not that intelligent, the Amoral Attorney is the Goliath in the [[DavidVersusGoliath David v. Goliath]] scenario.
scenario. Which of the two types of these attorneys appears usually correlates to the defendant's guilt: when an amoral prosecutor appears, than the defendant they're going after is almost always innocent, and amoral defense attorneys nearly always represent guilty-as-sin clients.



This trope is also usually averted if the lawyer in question is working for a cause such as environmentalism, legal aid, civil rights, or against corruption, which are often portrayed heroically. Often if the main character is a lawyer, they will be forced to choose between a high paying but amoral position with a business law firm, or a low paying job for an environmental or civil rights organization. This trope can be seen as a consequence of EvilPaysBetter: defense attorneys could never get rich if they [[GoodLawyersGoodClients only chose clients who were truly innocent]].

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This trope is also usually averted if the lawyer in question is working for a cause such as environmentalism, legal aid, civil rights, or against corruption, which are often portrayed heroically.heroically (and usually, there ''will'' be an Amoral Attorney on the other side). Often if the main character is a lawyer, they will be forced to choose between a high paying but amoral position with a business law firm, or a low paying job for an environmental or civil rights organization. This trope can be seen as a consequence of EvilPaysBetter: defense attorneys could never get rich if they [[GoodLawyersGoodClients only chose clients who were truly innocent]].
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