History Main / AllAnimalsareDogs

21st Oct '17 12:30:45 PM Prfnoff
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A lot of old Chinese buildings (temples, palaces, and government offices, as well as the homes of the wealthy) had guardian statues referred to in Chinese as ''shi'', which translates as "lion". An older Western term for them is "foo dogs" or "fu dogs" and the Japanese, who were introduced to them through Korea, called them "Korean dogs". To the extent they resemble ''any'' real creature it's about as fair to describe them as "dogs with perms/weird heads" as it is to describe them as lions. [[https://photomarks.wordpress.com/2014/08/24/allerton-park-and-retreat-center/ Examples here, from Robert Allerton Park in central Illinois]]. (Allerton was a huge fu dog fan and built this garden to display his collection.)

to:

* A lot of old Chinese buildings (temples, palaces, and government offices, as well as the homes of the wealthy) had guardian statues referred to in Chinese as ''shi'', which translates as "lion". An older Western term for them is "foo dogs" or "fu dogs" and the Japanese, who were introduced to them through Korea, called them "Korean dogs". (They are also commonly associated with Okinawa.) To the extent they resemble ''any'' real creature it's about as fair to describe them as "dogs with perms/weird heads" as it is to describe them as lions. [[https://photomarks.wordpress.com/2014/08/24/allerton-park-and-retreat-center/ Examples here, from Robert Allerton Park in central Illinois]]. (Allerton was a huge fu dog fan and built this garden to display his collection.)
15th Oct '17 5:55:53 AM CaptEquinox
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Averted in Creator/GordonRDickson's novel ''Wolf and Iron''. In the forward, the author relates that the original short story had the titular wolf acting like a dog. A reviewer gave him grief about it, so when he expanded it to a novel he made the wolf more, uh, wolflike.

to:

* Averted in Creator/GordonRDickson's novel ''Wolf and Iron''. In the forward, foreword, the author relates that the original short story had the titular wolf acting like a dog. A reviewer gave him grief about it, so when he expanded it to a novel he made the wolf more, uh, wolflike.wolflike.
** ''Wolf and Iron'' was originally a 1974 short story, "In Iron Years". There, the creature really was a dog.
15th Oct '17 5:52:52 AM CaptEquinox
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A lot of old Chinese buildings (temples, palaces, and government offices, as well as the homes of the wealthy) had guardian statues referred to in Chinese as ''shi'', which translates as "lion". An older Western term for them is "foo dogs", and the Japanese, who were introduced to them through Korea, called them "Korean dogs". To the extent they resemble ''any'' real creature it's about as fair to describe them as "dogs with perms/weird heads" as it is to describe them as lions.

to:

* A lot of old Chinese buildings (temples, palaces, and government offices, as well as the homes of the wealthy) had guardian statues referred to in Chinese as ''shi'', which translates as "lion". An older Western term for them is "foo dogs", dogs" or "fu dogs" and the Japanese, who were introduced to them through Korea, called them "Korean dogs". To the extent they resemble ''any'' real creature it's about as fair to describe them as "dogs with perms/weird heads" as it is to describe them as lions. [[https://photomarks.wordpress.com/2014/08/24/allerton-park-and-retreat-center/ Examples here, from Robert Allerton Park in central Illinois]]. (Allerton was a huge fu dog fan and built this garden to display his collection.)
6th Oct '17 11:20:30 AM CaptainTedium
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The ''WesternAnimation/EvilConCarne'' episode "Boskov's Day Out" had Major Doctor Ghastly walk Boskov, a bear, on a leash. Boskov also at one point tries to pee on a tree by hiking his hind leg.
29th Sep '17 6:33:17 AM CosmicFerret
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the BBC SpeculativeDocumentary ''My Pet Dinosaur'', they had [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology cat-sized bipedal sauropods]] as the equivalent of dogs. The sauropod was even named [[TheFlintstones Dino]].

to:

* In the BBC SpeculativeDocumentary ''My Pet Dinosaur'', they had [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology cat-sized bipedal sauropods]] as the equivalent of dogs. The sauropod was even named [[TheFlintstones [[WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones Dino]].



* The case of Dino from ''TheFlintstones'' cannot be ignored here, though he was [[HorseOfADifferentColor that setting's equivalent of a dog]].

to:

* The case of Dino from ''TheFlintstones'' ''WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones'' cannot be ignored here, though he was [[HorseOfADifferentColor that setting's equivalent of a dog]].
24th Sep '17 11:18:08 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The highly venomous snake Zith in the ''{{Malloreon}}'' readily befriends humans who stroke or feed her, purrs when happy, and shivers in cold weather. Also gives birth to live young, which though it sounds surprising, isn't as inaccurate as the rest. Quite a few snakes (many of them venomous; vipers got their name ''because'' of it) actually do give birth to live young.

to:

* The highly venomous snake Zith in the ''{{Malloreon}}'' ''Literature/TheMalloreon'' readily befriends humans who stroke or feed her, purrs when happy, and shivers in cold weather. Also gives birth to live young, which though it sounds surprising, isn't as inaccurate as the rest. Quite a few snakes (many of them venomous; vipers got their name ''because'' of it) actually do give birth to live young.
30th Aug '17 8:51:56 AM ElSquibbonator
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'', Batman and Catwoman encounter a vicious black panther. When Catwoman tames it, it starts playfully licking her like a dog. Though big cats do this as a sign of affection, their tongues are so rough that bare human skin will ''bleed'' from getting licked too much; think of how rough and ticklish a ''house cat's'' tongue is when it licks you, and multiply that several times.

to:

* In ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'', Batman and Catwoman encounter a vicious black panther. When Catwoman tames it, it starts playfully licking her like a dog. Though big cats do this as a sign of affection, their tongues are so rough that bare human skin will ''bleed'' from getting licked too much; think of how rough and ticklish a ''house cat's'' tongue is when it licks you, and multiply that several times. The saber-toothed cat that appears later on in this episode does the same thing.
30th Aug '17 8:46:19 AM ElSquibbonator
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Although all the dinosaurs in ''Disney/{{Dinosaur}}'' ([[CarnivoreConfusion the herbivores and cute ones, anyway]]) are {{Talking Animal}}s, there is an ankylosaur who can only bark, pant, and wag its tail. The AlternateCharacterInterpretation for some fans is that Url is mentally challenged.



** Although all the dinosaurs in ''Disney/{{Dinosaur}}'' ([[CarnivoreConfusion the herbivores and cute ones, anyway]]) are {{Talking Animal}}s, there is an ankylosaur who can only bark, pant, and wag its tail. The AlternateCharacterInterpretation for some fans is that Url is mentally challenged.
*** Also, the alternate-reality '''human''' child behaves rather like a puppy.

to:

** Although all the dinosaurs in ''Disney/{{Dinosaur}}'' ([[CarnivoreConfusion the herbivores and cute ones, anyway]]) are {{Talking Animal}}s, there is an ankylosaur who can only bark, pant, and wag its tail. The AlternateCharacterInterpretation for some fans is that Url is mentally challenged.
*** Also,
In ''WesternAnimation/TheGoodDinosaur'' the alternate-reality '''human''' child behaves rather like a puppy.
28th Jul '17 2:28:52 PM bfunc
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** This fox breeding experiment asked why certain animals could not be domesticated when closely related species could be. This was not a matter of breeding the most docile foxes. That had been tried many times before and always failed. The Soviet scientists had a hypothesis dealing with endocrine function that explained why the other programs failed and why this one might succeed. They were correct - at least for the silver fox. If simply breeding the docile ones were a viable domestication strategy, many more animals would be domesticated today. Interestingly, these scientists did not breed based on behavior at all. They bred based on blood tests and observed behavior.

to:

** This The selection criteria were basically: does the fox breeding experiment asked why certain ''flee from or attack'' humans trying to handle them, ''tolerate'' humans handling them, or ''act in a friendly manner towards'' humans who were handling them. The last group was the one chosen for breeding. After a few generations, they realized they needed to add an "elite" category for foxes that ''actively sought out'' human attention. By the 20th generation nearly a third of the kits born were in the "elite" group, and after 40 years the figure is closer to 80%. Despite the criteria being purely behavioral, there were some interesting physiological results as well, including spotting or mottling of the pelt; a lot of domestic animals could not have this, but relatively few wild animals do, and this had previously been believed to be domesticated when closely related species could be. This was not a matter result of humans breeding the most docile foxes. That had been tried many times before and always failed. The Soviet scientists had a hypothesis dealing with endocrine function that explained why the other programs failed and why this one might succeed. They were correct - at least for the silver fox. If simply breeding the docile ones were a viable domestication strategy, many more animals would be domesticated today. Interestingly, these scientists did not breed based on behavior at all. They bred based on blood tests and observed behavior.for a unique appearance; the fact that it occurred without being specifically selected for was a big surprise.
28th Jul '17 1:43:43 PM bfunc
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** As noted below in the Literature section, in the original source material calots are described as having been domesticated by the Martians in a parallel to the way dogs were domesticated by humans, and they play a similar role to Earthly "working dogs" (guard animals and companion hunters).
This list shows the last 10 events of 198. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AllAnimalsareDogs