History Main / AllAnimalsareDogs

28th Jul '17 2:28:52 PM bfunc
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** This fox breeding experiment asked why certain animals could not be domesticated when closely related species could be. This was not a matter of breeding the most docile foxes. That had been tried many times before and always failed. The Soviet scientists had a hypothesis dealing with endocrine function that explained why the other programs failed and why this one might succeed. They were correct - at least for the silver fox. If simply breeding the docile ones were a viable domestication strategy, many more animals would be domesticated today. Interestingly, these scientists did not breed based on behavior at all. They bred based on blood tests and observed behavior.

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** This The selection criteria were basically: does the fox breeding experiment asked why certain ''flee from or attack'' humans trying to handle them, ''tolerate'' humans handling them, or ''act in a friendly manner towards'' humans who were handling them. The last group was the one chosen for breeding. After a few generations, they realized they needed to add an "elite" category for foxes that ''actively sought out'' human attention. By the 20th generation nearly a third of the kits born were in the "elite" group, and after 40 years the figure is closer to 80%. Despite the criteria being purely behavioral, there were some interesting physiological results as well, including spotting or mottling of the pelt; a lot of domestic animals could not have this, but relatively few wild animals do, and this had previously been believed to be domesticated when closely related species could be. This was not a matter result of humans breeding the most docile foxes. That had been tried many times before and always failed. The Soviet scientists had a hypothesis dealing with endocrine function that explained why the other programs failed and why this one might succeed. They were correct - at least for the silver fox. If simply breeding the docile ones were a viable domestication strategy, many more animals would be domesticated today. Interestingly, these scientists did not breed based on behavior at all. They bred based on blood tests and observed behavior.for a unique appearance; the fact that it occurred without being specifically selected for was a big surprise.
28th Jul '17 1:43:43 PM bfunc
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** As noted below in the Literature section, in the original source material calots are described as having been domesticated by the Martians in a parallel to the way dogs were domesticated by humans, and they play a similar role to Earthly "working dogs" (guard animals and companion hunters).
28th Jul '17 1:23:46 PM bfunc
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* A lot of old Chinese buildings (temples, palaces, and government offices, as well as the homes of the wealthy had guardian statues referred to in Chinese as ''shi'', which translates as "lion". An older Western term for them is "foo dogs", and the Japanese, who were introduced to them through Korea, called them "Korean dogs". To the extent they resemble ''any'' real creature it's about as fair to describe them as "dogs with perms/weird heads" as it is to describe them as lions.

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* A lot of old Chinese buildings (temples, palaces, and government offices, as well as the homes of the wealthy wealthy) had guardian statues referred to in Chinese as ''shi'', which translates as "lion". An older Western term for them is "foo dogs", and the Japanese, who were introduced to them through Korea, called them "Korean dogs". To the extent they resemble ''any'' real creature it's about as fair to describe them as "dogs with perms/weird heads" as it is to describe them as lions.
28th Jul '17 1:23:00 PM bfunc
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* A lot of old Chinese buildings (temples, palaces, and government offices, as well as the homes of the wealthy had guardian statues referred to in Chinese as ''shi'', which translates as "lion". An older Western term for them is "foo dogs", and the Japanese, who were introduced to them through Korea, called them "Korean dogs". To the extent they resemble ''any'' real creature it's about as fair to describe them as "dogs with perms/weird heads" as it is to describe them as lions.
18th Jul '17 7:53:45 PM HeroGal2347
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* Tootsie the Triceratops in ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales'' is [[CousinOliver Bubba]]'s pet Triceratops and behaves like a dog.

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* Tootsie the Triceratops in ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales'' ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales1987'' is [[CousinOliver Bubba]]'s pet Triceratops and behaves like a dog.
15th Jul '17 6:08:39 AM Codefreak5
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* There are the aptly-named Houndeyes from ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'', which look like the back half of a dog with a zillion eyes planted in the torso stump. Despite only having the two legs, they run like an eager puppy, and their call sounds a little like barking simulated by a really cheap synthesizer. In fact, a Houndeye was originally supposed to be an animal companion for the player, following you around for most of the game. This was scrapped when play testers kept shooting the thing anyway, probably because of how alien and hideous the thing is.

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* There are the aptly-named Houndeyes from ''VideoGame/HalfLife1'', which look like the back half of a dog with a zillion eyes planted in the torso stump. Despite only having the two three legs, they run like an eager puppy, and their call sounds a little like barking simulated by a really cheap synthesizer. In fact, a Houndeye was originally supposed to be an animal companion for the player, following you around for most of the game. This was scrapped when play testers kept shooting the thing anyway, probably because of how alien and hideous the thing is.



* Varren from ''Franchise/MassEffect'' are large four legged creatures that resemble a creature half dog half fish, they bark bite and can be tamed. They are generally used as guard/attack dogs and their resemblance to dogs are brought up with the in-universe colloquialism of "Fishdogs" as a knickname for them.

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* Varren from ''Franchise/MassEffect'' are large four legged large, four-legged creatures that resemble a creature half dog half fish, they bark bite look half-dog, half-fish. They bark, bite, and can be tamed. They are generally used as guard/attack dogs dogs, and their resemblance to dogs are is brought up with the in-universe colloquialism nickname of "Fishdogs" as a knickname for them."Fishdogs".
28th May '17 2:48:33 PM ImaginationStarts
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** Although all the dinosaurs in ''Disney/{{Dinosaur}}'' ([[CarnivoreConfusion the herbivores and cute ones, anyway]]) are {{Talking Animal}}s, there is an ankylosaur who can only bark, pant, and wag its tail. The AlternateCharacterInterpretation for some fans is that Url is mentally challenged.



** In ''WesternAnimation/TheGoodDinosaur'', the alternate-reality '''human''' child behaves rather like a puppy.

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** In ''WesternAnimation/TheGoodDinosaur'', Although all the dinosaurs in ''Disney/{{Dinosaur}}'' ([[CarnivoreConfusion the herbivores and cute ones, anyway]]) are {{Talking Animal}}s, there is an ankylosaur who can only bark, pant, and wag its tail. The AlternateCharacterInterpretation for some fans is that Url is mentally challenged.
*** Also,
the alternate-reality '''human''' child behaves rather like a puppy.



** In ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory2'', Bullseye the horse acts much more like a dog, wagging his tail, licking people, coming when called, and whimpering like a dog in the third movie. Which is strange, because the character that is actually a dog, Slinky, does NOT act like this, and Buster, who is a non-toy dog, does. So aside from not being able to tell who is what from appearance alone they play this trope straight, toys are either humans or dogs.
*** The WesternAnimation/ToyStory short ''Toy Story of Terror'' has Mr. Jones, an iguana that behaves like a dog. He wags his tail, pants, fetches, and eats out of a dog bowl with his name on it like a dog.
** ''WesternAnimation/{{Cars}}'' has farm and construction equipment acting like cattle, miniature VW Beetles like insects, miniature aircraft as birds, toy cars as dogs/cats/rodents, and model trains as snakes.



* In ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory2'', Bullseye the horse acts much more like a dog, wagging his tail, licking people, coming when called, and whimpering like a dog in the third movie. Which is strange, because the character that is actually a dog, Slinky, does NOT act like this, and Buster, who is a non-toy dog, does. So aside from not being able to tell who is what from appearance alone they play this trope straight, toys are either humans or dogs.
** The WesternAnimation/ToyStory short ''Toy Story of Terror'' has Mr. Jones, an iguana that behaves like a dog. He wags his tail, pants, fetches, and eats out of a dog bowl with his name on it like a dog.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Cars}}'' has farm and construction equipment acting like cattle, miniature VW Beetles like insects, miniature aircraft as birds, toy cars as dogs/cats/rodents, and model trains as snakes.
9th May '17 2:53:26 PM Sugao
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* Witness a pet Asian small-clawed otter laying on its human's foot and [[https://www.facebook.com/Hybr1ds/videos/418128761853139/ gently wagging its tail like a content dog.]]
5th May '17 10:28:42 AM MarqFJA
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*** Almost all felines, from the largest tiger to the smallest kitten, kill their prey very quickly by way of a spine snapping bite to the back of the neck. When a cat bows it is exposing the back of its neck and telling you (or another cat) that it's not hostile, doesn't think you (or another cat) are a threat, and is not looking for a fight. It's very similar to how most friendly human greetings revolve around baring our necks, one of our most vulnerable spots.

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*** Almost all felines, from the largest tiger to the smallest kitten, kill their prey very quickly by way of a spine snapping spine-snapping bite to the back of the neck. When a cat bows it is exposing the back of its neck and telling you (or another cat) that it's not hostile, doesn't think you (or another cat) are a threat, and is not looking for a fight. It's very similar to how most friendly human greetings revolve around baring our necks, one of our most vulnerable spots.
1st May '17 9:00:16 AM Troperinik
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaeloo}}'': In one episode, Mr. Cat tries to tame Bad Kaeloo (who is a toad), and she starts wagging her "tail" and panting like a dog.
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