History Main / AliensNeverInventedTheWheel

31st Jan '18 12:01:04 PM Zaptech
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* In ''Franchise/MassEffect'', this worked to Humanity's advantage, as under the Treaty of Farixen, they were limited in the amount of Dreadnoughts they were allowed to build. Their response to this imposed restriction? To introduce the concept of a [[{{TheBattlestar}} Carrier]] to the galaxy, then proceed to build as many as they liked, safe in the knowledge that the treaty didn't specify ''[[LoopholeAbuse anything]]'' about them!
15th Jan '18 5:21:29 PM Arcorann
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* The whole plot of Creator/HarryTurtledove's short story "The Road Not Taken". Antigravity and FTL travel turn out to be so ridiculously easy to discover that it can be done by civilisations "who can barely smelt metal", but the science involved is so different that it doesn't work with any other form of science or technology, and throws off the development of UsefulNotes/TheScientificMethod. Also, once you have antigravity and FTL, it could be said that you don't ''need'' many other forms of science or tech, so they are never developed. You end up with civilizations that essentially stall at whatever technology level they were at when antigravity is discovered. Humans find out about this when they are invaded by aliens, the current dominant local interstellar power, who march out of their anti-gravity propelled starships and attempt to conquer the planet with ''muskets'' and linear battle tactics. Given that they attempt to invade early 21st century Earth, it's a short invasion, and humans promptly spread out to the stars with their superior technology.

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* The whole plot of backstory to Creator/HarryTurtledove's short story "Herbig-Haro", later expanded on in the prequel "The Road Not Taken". Antigravity and FTL travel turn out to be so ridiculously easy to discover that it can be done by civilisations "who can barely smelt metal", metal" (one race is mentioned to have bronze starships because they couldn't smelt iron), but the science involved is so different that it doesn't work with any other form of science or technology, and throws off the development of UsefulNotes/TheScientificMethod. Also, once you have antigravity and FTL, it could be said that you don't ''need'' many other forms of science or tech, so they are never developed. You end up with civilizations that essentially stall at whatever technology level they were at when antigravity is discovered. Humans find out about this when they are invaded by aliens, the current dominant local interstellar power, who march out of their anti-gravity propelled starships and attempt to conquer the planet with ''muskets'' and linear battle tactics. Given that they attempt to invade early 21st century Earth, it's a short invasion, and humans promptly spread out to the stars with their superior technology.
7th Dec '17 6:30:07 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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** Comes up again in a novel where Cortana takes control of a Convenant ship, and after commenting on how inefficiently they were running it promptly turns all the settings UpToEleven and shows off what it really can do.
22nd Nov '17 7:04:37 AM Arcorann
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* The whole plot of Creator/HarryTurtledove's short story "The Road Not Taken" and its sequel "Herbig-Haro". Antigravity and FTL travel turn out to be so ridiculously easy to discover that it can be done by civilisations "who can barely smelt metal", but the science involved is so different that it doesn't work with any other form of science or technology, and throws off the development of UsefulNotes/TheScientificMethod. Also, once you have antigravity and FTL, it could be said that you don't ''need'' many other forms of science or tech, so they are never developed. You end up with civilizations that essentially stall at whatever technology level they were at when antigravity is discovered. Humans find out about this when they are invaded by aliens, the current dominant local interstellar power, who march out of their anti-gravity propelled starships and attempt to conquer the planet with ''muskets'' and linear battle tactics. Given that they attempt to invade late 20th/early 21st century Earth, it's a short invasion, and humans promptly spread out to the stars with their superior technology. In the sequel, humans run into a species that had managed to carve out a small interstellar civilization without discovering antigravity and FTL, so now ''they'' are the ones caught in the antigravity trap[[note]]If we're being pedantic humans had also been weakened by spreading out ''so fast'', their circa 2050 technology couldn't allow a cohesive human nation to exist without fragmenting. However, the Orions would probably have beaten the Humans anyway[[/note]].

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* The whole plot of Creator/HarryTurtledove's short story "The Road Not Taken" and its sequel "Herbig-Haro".Taken". Antigravity and FTL travel turn out to be so ridiculously easy to discover that it can be done by civilisations "who can barely smelt metal", but the science involved is so different that it doesn't work with any other form of science or technology, and throws off the development of UsefulNotes/TheScientificMethod. Also, once you have antigravity and FTL, it could be said that you don't ''need'' many other forms of science or tech, so they are never developed. You end up with civilizations that essentially stall at whatever technology level they were at when antigravity is discovered. Humans find out about this when they are invaded by aliens, the current dominant local interstellar power, who march out of their anti-gravity propelled starships and attempt to conquer the planet with ''muskets'' and linear battle tactics. Given that they attempt to invade late 20th/early early 21st century Earth, it's a short invasion, and humans promptly spread out to the stars with their superior technology. In the sequel, humans run into a species that had managed to carve out a small interstellar civilization without discovering antigravity and FTL, so now ''they'' are the ones caught in the antigravity trap[[note]]If we're being pedantic humans had also been weakened by spreading out ''so fast'', their circa 2050 technology couldn't allow a cohesive human nation to exist without fragmenting. However, the Orions would probably have beaten the Humans anyway[[/note]].technology.
11th Nov '17 8:56:27 PM ZerroDefex
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Added DiffLines:

** Comes up again in a novel where Cortana takes control of a Convenant ship, and after commenting on how inefficiently they were running it promptly turns all the settings UpToEleven and shows off what it really can do.
3rd Nov '17 6:15:02 PM SomberCaelifera
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*** As both speech and gestures have biological prerequisites, this could very well happen to a species that lacked both the fine motor control for gestures (or hands) and the peculiar throat anatomy for speech (not to mention the even finer motor control that speech requires, which needs tiny movements of the necessary body parts, completed in a fraction of a second).



* In ''Series/{{Farscape}}'', Crichton misses various things from Earth which he is unable to acquire in space such as chocolate, milk and jeans. Also, you have to go to Earth if you want to get your favourite DRD some WD40.

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* In ''Series/{{Farscape}}'', Crichton misses various things from Earth which he is unable to acquire in space such as chocolate, milk and jeans. Also, you have to go to Earth if you want to get your favourite DRD some WD40.
[=WD40=].
3rd Nov '17 5:49:22 PM SomberCaelifera
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[[folder:Audio Plays]]
*One BigFinishDoctorWho audio play puts Tegan in the awkward position of having to explain what toothpaste is. To a [[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien Time Lord]].
[[/folder]]



* One arc in Astonishing ''ComicBook/XMen'' covers a mysterious alien warrior trying to prevent an anonymous mutant from fullfilling a prophecy to destroy his wartorn home planet. War and destruction is so central to his home culture that they don't have a word for hospital, and the concept of a place of healing is so against their culture that the one medieval level hospital on the planet is shrouded in secrecy lest the planet's elders murder its patients.

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* One arc in Astonishing ''ComicBook/XMen'' covers a mysterious alien warrior trying to prevent an anonymous mutant from fullfilling fulfilling a prophecy to destroy his wartorn home planet. War and destruction is so central to his home culture that they don't have a word for hospital, and the concept of a place of healing is so against their culture that the one medieval level hospital on the planet is shrouded in secrecy lest the planet's elders murder its patients.
29th Sep '17 8:03:07 AM ApeAccount
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Series/{{Farscape}}'', Crichton misses various things from Earth which he is unable to acquire in space such as chocolate, milk and jeans. Also, you have to go to Earth if you want to get your favourite DRD some WD40.
27th Sep '17 3:45:45 AM TheCuza
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* The Thermians from ''Film/GalaxyQuest'' don't know the concept of fiction, period. As a result, they mistake TV series like ''[[ShowWithinAShow Galaxy Quest]]'' and ''Series/GilligansIsland'' for real events. This is related to the fact that they also didn't know what lying was, until they met the BigBad (who incidentally figures out the plot and finds it hilarious).

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* The Thermians from ''Film/GalaxyQuest'' don't know the concept of fiction, period. As a result, they mistake TV series like ''[[ShowWithinAShow Galaxy Quest]]'' and ''Series/GilligansIsland'' for as historical documents of real events. This is related to the fact that they also didn't know what lying was, or deception were, until they met the BigBad (who incidentally figures out Sarris who was more than happy to give a demonstration. Sarris ends up watching the plot "historical documents" to see what his new opponents are all about, but he recognizes it as a TV show instantly, and finds it hilarious).hilarious that the Thermians recruited a bunch of washed-up actors believing they were real heroes.
22nd Sep '17 6:17:42 PM rwe1138
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* One arc in the astonishing ''ComicBook/XMen'' covers a mysterious alien warrior trying to prevent an anonymous mutant from fullfilling a prophecy to destroy his wartorn home planet. War and destruction is so central to his home culture that they don't have a word for hospital, and the concept of a place of healing is so against their culture that the one medieval level hospital on the planet is shrouded in secrecy lest the planet's elders murder its patients.

to:

* One arc in the astonishing Astonishing ''ComicBook/XMen'' covers a mysterious alien warrior trying to prevent an anonymous mutant from fullfilling a prophecy to destroy his wartorn home planet. War and destruction is so central to his home culture that they don't have a word for hospital, and the concept of a place of healing is so against their culture that the one medieval level hospital on the planet is shrouded in secrecy lest the planet's elders murder its patients.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AliensNeverInventedTheWheel