History Main / AchievementsInIgnorance

22nd Nov '17 1:12:05 PM FoxBluereaver
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* In ''Fanfic/PokemonResetBloodlines'', Ash has to retrain Pikachu to recover his moves. He succeeds with Thunderbolt, Iron Tail and Quick Attack without much trouble. However, his attempts to relearn Electro Ball result in Pikachu learning ''Zap Cannon'' instead.
17th Nov '17 9:33:48 AM hullflyer
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** RogerEbert came up against a similar situation. His friend Gene Siskel was a very good poker player, who had cleaned up at his bachelor party. At Ebert's, however, he lost. When Roger asked him what happened, Gene replied "Your friends don't know how to play poker. You can't win against someone who makes a bet for fun."
17th Nov '17 5:37:26 AM hullflyer
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* In the movie version of ''Film/BeingThere'', this is a possible explanation for [[spoiler:the final shot in which Chance walks on water]].

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* In the movie version of ''Film/BeingThere'', this is a possible explanation for [[spoiler:the final shot in which Chance walks on water]]. It's also the reason he gets as far as he does in the film with the people around him - he doesn't actually realize what he's doing most of the time.
13th Nov '17 5:32:34 PM Ronfar
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** In the realm of “possible but exceedingly unlikely”, Homer also manages to prevent a catastrophic meltdown two separate times by pressing a single button on his console at random.
3rd Nov '17 11:16:00 PM ImpudentInfidel
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** This is how a lot of humanity's technology operates in the dark days of the 41st millennium. After thousands of years of scientific regression, the [[MachineWorship Adeptus Mechanicus]] not only has a monopoly on mankind's LostTechnology, they worship it and wrap all but the simplest of mechanical tasks into a religious ritual. So activating an ancient plasma reactor or whatnot involves a great deal of chanting, incense, the application of sanctified engine oil, and some specific taps with a wrench that just so happen to hit the "on" switch. DependingOnTheWriter this is all a scheme to keep the common people from learning how to maintain their own devices, while other sources have the [=AdMech=] genuinely clueless of the scientific principles behind their shiny toys.

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** This is how a lot of humanity's technology operates in the dark days of the 41st millennium. After thousands of years of scientific regression, the [[MachineWorship Adeptus Mechanicus]] not only has a monopoly on mankind's LostTechnology, they worship it and wrap all but the simplest of mechanical tasks into a religious ritual. So activating an ancient plasma reactor or whatnot involves a great deal of chanting, incense, the application of sanctified engine oil, and some specific taps with a wrench that just so happen to hit the "on" switch. DependingOnTheWriter this is all a scheme to keep the common people from learning how to maintain their own devices, while other sources have the [=AdMech=] genuinely clueless of the scientific principles behind their shiny toys. In yet others much of it is ''real'', the Machine Spirits the worship is meant to appease exist, and advanced Tech Priests are essentially [[TechnoWizard wizards]].
1st Nov '17 1:53:47 AM Nintendoman01
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* ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2012'': In "Battle for New York, Part 1," Mikey's make retro-mutagen for the Kraang's victims not only succeed, but the batch he creates can even turn mutagen ''into'' retro-mutagen. Donnie is in absolute disbelief when Mikey admits he has no idea how he did it.
-->'''Donnie''': Are you kidding me? You do ''one'' awesome thing, and you can't even remember how you did it?!
26th Oct '17 3:52:55 AM LinTaylor
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* In ''Webcomic/OnePunchMan'', Saitama 100% honestly believes that his absolutely insane levels of strength, speed, and durability came from his daily basic training regimen of 100 push-ups, 100 sit-ups, 100 squats, and 10 kilometers of running. Everybody incredulously points out it's physically impossible for a normal human to get that strong even if they trained all the time for the rest of their lives.
** In the interest of fairness, it seems to be the act of doing one thing obsessively that results in the CharlesAtlasSuperpower in this universe, but Saitama didn't know that.

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* In ''Webcomic/OnePunchMan'', Saitama 100% honestly believes that his absolutely insane levels of strength, speed, and durability came from his sticking to a daily basic training regimen of 100 push-ups, 100 sit-ups, 100 squats, and 10 kilometers of running. Everybody incredulously running for three years straight. When his "student" Genos points out it's physically impossible for a normal human to get that strong that's just mundane strength training (and not even if they trained all the time for the rest a very difficult level of their lives.
** In the interest of fairness, it seems
it, either) and demands to be the act of doing one thing obsessively that results in the CharlesAtlasSuperpower in this universe, but know what his '''real''' secret is, Saitama didn't know that.responds "Look, you might not believe me, but that's really all I did." The series eventually suggests that Saitama broke some kind of internal "limiter" during those three years, which is the real answer for his abilities (and his [[PrematurelyBald Premature Baldness]]).
25th Oct '17 10:49:28 AM KeithM
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* Evolutionary computer design is based on this principle: you set the end goals you want the program to achieve, but don't give it specific instructions on how to get there, allowing the program try some solutions, test them, then mutate and combine the best of them to try again. The end result is often something no human would ever design but would perform at least as well if not better. One example was designing a structural "backbone" for a space station. Human designs involved a standard radio-tower style beam, while the computer produced [[http://www.southampton.ac.uk/~ajk/truss/welcome.html an organic design]] that looked like an actual bone, massed less, and was structurally stronger. Perhaps one of the strangest examples was when a piece of programmable hardware ran a genetic algorithm to try to create an oscillator and ended up creating a [[http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn2732-radio-emerges-from-the-electronic-soup.html radio receiver and parasite at the same time]]. Another [[http://www.damninteresting.com/on-the-origin-of-circuits/ experiment]] ran on a programmable logic array to distinguish between sounds resulted in a circuit where part of it wasn't even connected to any inputs, outputs or the rest of the circuit, but if removed resulted in the circuit failing. It also didn't work when copied to another chip of the same kind which means it used ''subtle manufacturing defects'' of the chip as integral parts of the circuit! And there's [[http://boingboing.net/2004/06/28/evolved-antenna-desi.html this antenna]], which manages better coverage, less energy spent, ''and'' skipping some steps of the production process. And also looks like a spider with a bad seizure.

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* Evolutionary computer design is based on this principle: you set the end goals you want the program to achieve, achieve but don't give it specific instructions on how to get there, allowing the program try some solutions, solutions by randomly altering some of the variables, test them, then mutate and combine the best of them to try again.and randomly "mutate" some of the variables again, and go on. The end result is often something no human would ever design but would perform at least as well if not better. One example was designing a structural "backbone" for a space station. Human designs involved a standard radio-tower style beam, while the computer produced [[http://www.southampton.ac.uk/~ajk/truss/welcome.html an organic design]] that looked like an actual bone, massed less, and was structurally stronger. Perhaps one of the strangest examples was when a piece of programmable hardware ran a genetic algorithm to try to create an oscillator and ended up creating a [[http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn2732-radio-emerges-from-the-electronic-soup.html radio receiver and parasite at the same time]]. Another [[http://www.damninteresting.com/on-the-origin-of-circuits/ experiment]] ran on a programmable logic array to distinguish between sounds resulted in a circuit where part of it wasn't even connected to any inputs, outputs or the rest of the circuit, but if removed resulted in the circuit failing. It also didn't work when copied to another chip of the same kind which means it used ''subtle manufacturing defects'' of the chip as integral parts of the circuit! And there's [[http://boingboing.net/2004/06/28/evolved-antenna-desi.html this antenna]], which manages better coverage, less energy spent, ''and'' skipping some steps of the production process. And also looks like a spider with a bad seizure.
25th Oct '17 9:52:33 AM rjd1922
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* Columbus's discovery of the Americas was pretty much because of this trope. [[TvTropes/CommonKnowledge Contrary to urban legend]], both Columbus and the people he asked to fund him were perfectly well aware that the world was round and that, theoretically, one could reach Asia by going westward. However, the Earth's circumference was well-known to be such that a cross-globe journey would be ''ridiculously impractical'' with the technology of the day. Columbus thought he could do it because he badly miscalculated how big the Earth was (he thought the Atlantic was a little larger than it actually was, but didn't know about the existence of the Pacific). He persuaded Isabella of Spain to finance his journey, and did indeed find land where he expected it to be- it's just that said land was not actually Asia, but a giant landmass about halfway between Europe and Asia that no European knew existed before Columbus ran into it because he thought Asia would be there.

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* Columbus's UsefulNotes/ChristopherColumbus's discovery of the Americas was pretty much because of this trope. [[TvTropes/CommonKnowledge [[CommonKnowledge Contrary to urban legend]], both Columbus and the people he asked to fund him were perfectly well aware that the world was round and that, theoretically, one could reach Asia by going westward. However, the Earth's circumference was well-known to be such that a cross-globe journey would be ''ridiculously impractical'' with the technology of the day. Columbus thought he could do it because he badly miscalculated how big the Earth was (he thought the Atlantic was a little larger than it actually was, but didn't know about the existence of the Pacific). He persuaded Isabella of Spain to finance his journey, and did indeed find land where he expected it to be- it's just that said land was not actually Asia, but a giant landmass about halfway between Europe and Asia that no European knew existed before Columbus ran into it because he thought Asia would be there.
24th Oct '17 10:01:27 AM Lloigor
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** In a ''Treehouse of Terror'' episode, he managed to build a TimeMachine by failing to repair his toaster.

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** In a ''Treehouse of Terror'' Horror'' episode, he managed to build a TimeMachine by failing to repair his toaster.
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