History Literature / TheRailwaySeries

20th Feb '17 1:56:12 AM Thomasfan
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* TwinSwitch: Donald and Douglas in ''The Missing Coach'' and Bill and Ben in ''The Diseasel''.

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* {{Trigger}}: Whatever you do, don't mention 'scrap' to Donald and Douglas.
* TwinSwitch: Donald and Douglas in ''The Missing Coach'' (and it's implied they did it before those events to get to Sodor to start with) and Bill and Ben in ''The Diseasel''.
11th Feb '17 10:04:48 PM danlansdowne
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** Most of the standard gauge engines are based on real-life prototypes. Toby's former branch line, in particular, was based on the Wisbech and Upwell Tramway, where his prototype operated until the 1950s.



** The Painter that got angry at Henry for spilling his paint rather then making him lose his balance on the ladder.
** The Barber that got angry with Duck for frightening his customers rather then crashing into the Barber shop which may have endangered the lives of said customers.

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** The Painter that got angry at Henry for spilling his paint rather then than making him lose his balance on the ladder.
** The Barber that got angry with Duck for frightening his customers rather then than crashing into the Barber shop which may have endangered the lives of said customers.
16th Jan '17 3:33:19 PM moloch
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* ArtEvolution: Across four different official illustrators[[labelnote:*]]The first two books were illustrated by William Middleton and Reginald Payne, but redrawn and touched-up, respectively, by the first "official" artist, Dalby[[/labelnote]]. The style of C Reginald Dalby (1945-1956), the first, was rather sunny and miniature-like, though his disinterest in consistency and technical details led to disagreements with Awdry. John Kenney's (1957-1962) style was more realistic and dynamic, and often painted from life or photo-reference. Peter and Gunvor Edwards' (1963-1972) work resembled Kenny's, but with greater emphasis on landscape and weather, and an impressionist influence. Clive Spong's (1983-present) work is about as picturesque as Kenney.

to:

* ArtEvolution: Across four different official illustrators[[labelnote:*]]The first two books were illustrated by William Middleton and Reginald Payne, but redrawn and touched-up, respectively, by the first "official" artist, Dalby[[/labelnote]]. The style of C Reginald Dalby (1945-1956), the first, was rather sunny and miniature-like, though his disinterest in consistency and technical details led to disagreements with Awdry. John Kenney's (1957-1962) style was more realistic and dynamic, and often painted from life or photo-reference. Peter and Gunvor Edwards' (1963-1972) work resembled Kenny's, but with greater emphasis on landscape and weather, and an impressionist influence. Clive Spong's (1983-present) work is features landscapes about as picturesque as Kenney.Dalby's, but with Kenney's eye for accuracy and detail.
8th Jan '17 1:57:04 PM moloch
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* ArtEvolution: Across four different official illustrators[[labelnote:*]]The first few books were illustrated by others, but touched up or redrawn by the first "official" artist, Dalby[[/labelnote]]. The style of C Reginald Dalby (1945-1956), the first, was rather sunny and miniature-like, though his disinterest in consistency and technical details led to disagreements with Awdry. John Kenney's (1957-1962) style was more realistic and dynamic, and often painted from life or photo-reference. Peter and Gunvor Edwards' (1963-1972) work resembled Kenny's, but with greater emphasis on landscape and weather, and an impressionist influence. Clive Spong's (1983-present) work is about as picturesque as Kenney.

to:

* ArtEvolution: Across four different official illustrators[[labelnote:*]]The first few two books were illustrated by others, William Middleton and Reginald Payne, but touched up or redrawn and touched-up, respectively, by the first "official" artist, Dalby[[/labelnote]]. The style of C Reginald Dalby (1945-1956), the first, was rather sunny and miniature-like, though his disinterest in consistency and technical details led to disagreements with Awdry. John Kenney's (1957-1962) style was more realistic and dynamic, and often painted from life or photo-reference. Peter and Gunvor Edwards' (1963-1972) work resembled Kenny's, but with greater emphasis on landscape and weather, and an impressionist influence. Clive Spong's (1983-present) work is about as picturesque as Kenney.
16th Nov '16 5:42:47 AM john_e
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* AlwaysFemale / AlwayMale: All of the coaches and trucks are females and males respectively.

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* AlwaysFemale / AlwayMale: AlwaysMale: All of the coaches and trucks are females and males respectively.
31st Aug '16 8:31:31 AM 313Bluestreak
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* RealLifeWritesThePlot: Skarloey Railway locomotives sometimes visit the Talyllyn Railway, a move designed to write in the fact that Talyllyn locomotives are sometimes decorated to look like their Skarloey counterparts
31st Aug '16 8:29:13 AM 313Bluestreak
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Added DiffLines:

* TerribleTrio: Gordon, James, and Henry are a lighter example. Though not really villain, they are rather arrogant peers. Duck even advised Donald and Douglas in "The Missing Coach" to watch out for the three engines for they'll start some nonsense.
31st Aug '16 8:12:46 AM 313Bluestreak
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* BrattyHalfPint: Thomas started out as one in his CharacterArc. The same goes for Percy. Bill and Ben are always this as [=BoCo=] points out how they can be maddening at times.



* BrattyHalfPint: Thomas started out as one in his CharacterArc. The same goes for Percy. Bill and Ben are always this as [=BoCo=] points out how they can be maddening at times.

to:

* BrattyHalfPint: Thomas started out as one in his CharacterArc. The same goes for Percy. Bill BullyHunter: Duck and Ben are always this as [=BoCo=] points out how they can be maddening at times.Percy stood up against the trio of Gordon, Henry, and James who were heckling the little engines in "Duck Takes Charge".



* JerkJock: Gordon, James, and Henry have this kind of personality.

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* JerkJock: Gordon, James, and Henry have this kind sort of personality.personality. They are the main line engines, but often bully and heckle the other engines whom they think aren't as good as them.



** Before James came along, there was the trio of Edward, Henry, and Gordon from ''The Three Railway Engines''. Edward is nice and friendly, Gordon is pompous and haughty, and Henry is in between where remorseful of his selfish behavior of not wanting to come out of the tunnel.

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** Before James came along, there was the trio of Edward, Henry, and Gordon from ''The Three Railway Engines''. Edward is nice and friendly, Gordon is pompous and haughty, and Henry is in between where he was remorseful of his selfish behavior of not wanting to come out of the tunnel.
31st Aug '16 8:03:58 AM 313Bluestreak
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* AlwaysFemale / AlwayMale: All of the coaches and trucks are females and males respectively.



** Don't bump the coaches or they might bump you off the rails. Just ask Sir Handel.



* ContinuitySnarl: The story of Godred, an arrogant mountain engine who violently derailed and was subsequently cannibalized for parts (based off of the real world story of ''Ladas''), is a rather confusing affair. The original book, ''Mountain Engines'' states that Culdee made the entire story up to scare Sir Handel and Duncan. Yet the various companion books treat the entire incident as a fact, as evidenced by the lack of a No. 1 engine on the CFR. It's further confounded by some of the tie-in magazine stories, which have Godred alive and well, completely recovered from the accident.



* ContinuitySnarl: The story of Godred, an arrogant mountain engine who violently derailed and was subsequently cannibalized for parts (based off of the real world story of ''Ladas''), is a rather confusing affair. The original book, ''Mountain Engines'' states that Culdee made the entire story up to scare Sir Handel and Duncan. Yet the various companion books treat the entire incident as a fact, as evidenced by the lack of a No. 1 engine on the CFR. It's further confounded by some of the tie-in magazine stories, which have Godred alive and well, completely recovered from the accident.



* FeudEpisode: The quarrel between Thomas and Percy in "More About Thomas The Tank Engine". Also Skarloey and Rheneas in their younger years in "Stick-in-the-Mud".

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* FeudEpisode: The quarrel between Thomas and Percy in "More the book ''More About Thomas The Tank Engine".Engine''. Also Skarloey and Rheneas in their younger years in "Stick-in-the-Mud".


Added DiffLines:

* JerkJock: Gordon, James, and Henry have this kind of personality.


Added DiffLines:

* NiceGuy: Some examples include Edward, Toby, and [=BoCo=].
* NiceMeanAndInbetween:
** Thomas, Percy, and Toby. Toby is nice and respectful, Thomas is cheeky and arrogant, (although he has become nicer and kind-hearted later on), and Percy mediates between the two where he can be nice, but has moments of being cheeky like Thomas.
** Gordon, James, and Henry. Henry is nicer and more sympathetic than the other two while James is more vain and arrogant than Gordon, who occasionally shows his soft and humble side more than James does.
** Before James came along, there was the trio of Edward, Henry, and Gordon from ''The Three Railway Engines''. Edward is nice and friendly, Gordon is pompous and haughty, and Henry is in between where remorseful of his selfish behavior of not wanting to come out of the tunnel.


Added DiffLines:

* TeamDad: Edward is this to Bill and Ben. Duck comments that he is the only engine to keep the mischievous twins in order.
30th Aug '16 7:19:16 PM NWolfman
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* TakeThat: In one story, Thomas refers to Percy as a "green caterpillar with red stripes". This was the exact wording that the Reverend used when he reacted poorly to earlier illustrations of Percy by Reginald Dalby. Dalby didn't take it too well.

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* TakeThat: TakeThat
**
In one story, Thomas refers to Percy as a "green caterpillar with red stripes". This was the exact wording that the Reverend used when he reacted poorly to earlier illustrations of Percy by Reginald Dalby. Dalby didn't take it too well.well.
** The Fat Director, [[IHaveManyNames aka the Fat Controller, aka Sir Topham Hatt]], was written as an insult to pompous railway directors. Notice how his first appearance has him doing noting but telling people what to do and/or making them miserable.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheRailwaySeries