History Literature / TheRailwaySeries

28th May '17 1:15:43 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* FranchiseZombie: The Reverend wanted to end the series with Book 12, ''The Eight Famous Engines'', but the publishers wanted the series to continue. He stopped officially after Book 26 for fear of this.
28th May '17 1:14:58 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* EarlybirdCameo: In later editions of ''The Three Railway Engines'', the engine who tries to push Henry out of the tunnel bears a striking likeness to James.

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* EarlybirdCameo: EarlyBirdCameo: In later editions of ''The Three Railway Engines'', the engine who tries to push Henry out of the tunnel bears a striking likeness to James.
24th May '17 7:06:51 PM glickmam
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* NeverMyFault: The Engines are being blamed for ''Human'' error. A common example includes Thomas being blamed for crashing into the stationmaster's house even though it was a cleaner that carelessly fiddled with his controls.

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* NeverMyFault: The Engines are being blamed for ''Human'' error. A common example includes Thomas being blamed for crashing into the stationmaster's house even though it was a cleaner that carelessly fiddled with his controls. Awdry wrote the stories like this because he was afraid that if the human characters ''did'' get blamed for their mistakes, it would make real railway personnel look bad.
27th Apr '17 9:16:53 AM ScottMarshall
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* ArbitrarySkepticism: The big engines think the "wee engines" (Rex, Mike, and Bert) are some sort of magic, despite the fact they met small engines before (eg, the Skarloey engines).

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* ArbitrarySkepticism: The big engines think the "wee "verra wee engines" (Rex, Mike, and Bert) are some sort of magic, despite the fact they met small engines before (eg, the Skarloey engines).
17th Apr '17 6:42:55 PM 313Bluestreak
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** Don't make fun of Donald and Douglas' whistles.

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** Don't make fun of Donald and Douglas' whistles.whistles as Gordon and Henry found out. And don't threaten Douglas in Donald's presence (or the other way round for that matter). Just ask The Spiteful Brake Van.
23rd Feb '17 2:12:09 PM Psi001
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* ArtEvolution: Across four different official illustrators[[labelnote:*]]The first two books were illustrated by William Middleton and Reginald Payne, but redrawn and touched-up, respectively, by the first "official" artist, Dalby[[/labelnote]]. The style of C Reginald Dalby (1945-1956), the first, was rather sunny and miniature-like, though his disinterest in consistency and technical details led to disagreements with Awdry. John Kenney's (1957-1962) style was more realistic and dynamic, and often painted from life or photo-reference. Peter and Gunvor Edwards' (1963-1972) work resembled Kenny's, but with greater emphasis on landscape and weather, and an impressionist influence. Clive Spong's (1983-present) work features landscapes about as picturesque as Dalby's, but with Kenney's eye for accuracy and detail.

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* ArtEvolution: ArtEvolution:
**
Across four different official illustrators[[labelnote:*]]The first two books were illustrated by William Middleton and Reginald Payne, but redrawn and touched-up, respectively, by the first "official" artist, Dalby[[/labelnote]]. The style of C Reginald Dalby (1945-1956), the first, was rather sunny and miniature-like, though his disinterest in consistency and technical details led to disagreements with Awdry. John Kenney's (1957-1962) style was more realistic and dynamic, and often painted from life or photo-reference. Peter and Gunvor Edwards' (1963-1972) work resembled Kenny's, but with greater emphasis on landscape and weather, and an impressionist influence. Clive Spong's (1983-present) work features landscapes about as picturesque as Dalby's, but with Kenney's eye for accuracy and detail.detail.
** For one individual artist, Spong's illustrations for his first novel "Really Useful Engines" and some early tie-in books used a more cartoony style reminiscent of Dalby's and the TV adaptation, especially concerning the engine's facial expressions. Afterwards a more realistic, detailed design took over.
20th Feb '17 1:56:12 AM Thomasfan
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* TwinSwitch: Donald and Douglas in ''The Missing Coach'' and Bill and Ben in ''The Diseasel''.

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* {{Trigger}}: Whatever you do, don't mention 'scrap' to Donald and Douglas.
* TwinSwitch: Donald and Douglas in ''The Missing Coach'' (and it's implied they did it before those events to get to Sodor to start with) and Bill and Ben in ''The Diseasel''.
11th Feb '17 10:04:48 PM danlansdowne
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** Most of the standard gauge engines are based on real-life prototypes. Toby's former branch line, in particular, was based on the Wisbech and Upwell Tramway, where his prototype operated until the 1950s.



** The Painter that got angry at Henry for spilling his paint rather then making him lose his balance on the ladder.
** The Barber that got angry with Duck for frightening his customers rather then crashing into the Barber shop which may have endangered the lives of said customers.

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** The Painter that got angry at Henry for spilling his paint rather then than making him lose his balance on the ladder.
** The Barber that got angry with Duck for frightening his customers rather then than crashing into the Barber shop which may have endangered the lives of said customers.
16th Jan '17 3:33:19 PM moloch
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* ArtEvolution: Across four different official illustrators[[labelnote:*]]The first two books were illustrated by William Middleton and Reginald Payne, but redrawn and touched-up, respectively, by the first "official" artist, Dalby[[/labelnote]]. The style of C Reginald Dalby (1945-1956), the first, was rather sunny and miniature-like, though his disinterest in consistency and technical details led to disagreements with Awdry. John Kenney's (1957-1962) style was more realistic and dynamic, and often painted from life or photo-reference. Peter and Gunvor Edwards' (1963-1972) work resembled Kenny's, but with greater emphasis on landscape and weather, and an impressionist influence. Clive Spong's (1983-present) work is about as picturesque as Kenney.

to:

* ArtEvolution: Across four different official illustrators[[labelnote:*]]The first two books were illustrated by William Middleton and Reginald Payne, but redrawn and touched-up, respectively, by the first "official" artist, Dalby[[/labelnote]]. The style of C Reginald Dalby (1945-1956), the first, was rather sunny and miniature-like, though his disinterest in consistency and technical details led to disagreements with Awdry. John Kenney's (1957-1962) style was more realistic and dynamic, and often painted from life or photo-reference. Peter and Gunvor Edwards' (1963-1972) work resembled Kenny's, but with greater emphasis on landscape and weather, and an impressionist influence. Clive Spong's (1983-present) work is features landscapes about as picturesque as Kenney.Dalby's, but with Kenney's eye for accuracy and detail.
8th Jan '17 1:57:04 PM moloch
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* ArtEvolution: Across four different official illustrators[[labelnote:*]]The first few books were illustrated by others, but touched up or redrawn by the first "official" artist, Dalby[[/labelnote]]. The style of C Reginald Dalby (1945-1956), the first, was rather sunny and miniature-like, though his disinterest in consistency and technical details led to disagreements with Awdry. John Kenney's (1957-1962) style was more realistic and dynamic, and often painted from life or photo-reference. Peter and Gunvor Edwards' (1963-1972) work resembled Kenny's, but with greater emphasis on landscape and weather, and an impressionist influence. Clive Spong's (1983-present) work is about as picturesque as Kenney.

to:

* ArtEvolution: Across four different official illustrators[[labelnote:*]]The first few two books were illustrated by others, William Middleton and Reginald Payne, but touched up or redrawn and touched-up, respectively, by the first "official" artist, Dalby[[/labelnote]]. The style of C Reginald Dalby (1945-1956), the first, was rather sunny and miniature-like, though his disinterest in consistency and technical details led to disagreements with Awdry. John Kenney's (1957-1962) style was more realistic and dynamic, and often painted from life or photo-reference. Peter and Gunvor Edwards' (1963-1972) work resembled Kenny's, but with greater emphasis on landscape and weather, and an impressionist influence. Clive Spong's (1983-present) work is about as picturesque as Kenney.
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