History Literature / ThePowerAndTheGlory

18th Feb '16 11:00:10 AM MetaFour
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* AllLovingHero: The priest aspires to be this, and criticizes himself harshly for not living up to this ideal. He feels a great deal of paternal affection for Brigitta, and he's deeply ashamed that he doesn't care as deeply for everyone else he meets.



* BadLiar: A mestizo insists on accompanying the priest on flimsy premises, and can't keep his own story straight when the priest asks him questions. The priest figures out almost immediately that this man wants to betray him to the police. It becomes truly absurd when the mestizo outright admits that he's waiting for the right time to betray the priest--and then he complains that the priest won't trust him.
* BittersweetEnding: On the one hand, the priest is executed at the end. On the other hand, he may have found peace in death, and the arrival of another priest in the final scene demonstrates the the Church cannot be destroyed, that the priest's death was not in vain.



* CirclingVultures: Vultures are present in the very first scene, and reappear in many later scenes, to foreshadow that the priest is not going to survive.



* ChekhovsGun: The American convict; the priest baptising a (male) baby Birgitta whilst drunk.

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* ChekhovsGun: The American convict; the priest baptising a (male) baby Birgitta Brigitta whilst drunk.



* DecoyProtagonist: Tench the dentist.
* DirtyCop: The Chief of Police (unknowingly) drinks (illegal) alcohol with the priest. Also a larger theme: both the church and the state have corrupt practitioners.
* DownerEnding: From a certain perspective.
* HopeSpot: Three notable examples, though the entire novel is full of them. The priest's first failed escape. The priest buying wine and whiskey, only to have the latter drunk, and [[spoiler:The priest escaping over the border when it becomes clear that his presence is only putting others in danger. He then returns, knowing it's a trap, in order to do his duty.]] Throughout the novel, the priest is given the opportunity to escape, only each time something stops him.

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* DeathbedConfession: Subverted. The dying outlaw James Calver asks for a priest so he can confess his sins, and the priest comes for him, at great personal risk. The outlaw changes his mind in the interim, and instead tries to give the priest his weapon. The priest reflects on the whole concept of deathbed conversions, and how ''difficult'' it is for someone who has run away from God their whole life to truly change their mind in their final moments.
* DecoyProtagonist: Tench Mr. Tench, the dentist.
dentist, is the viewpoint character of the first chapter, but only plays a minor role in the story.
* DirtyCop: The Chief of Police (unknowingly) drinks (illegal) alcohol with alcohol--ironically, sharing it the priest.priest (unbeknownst to him). Also a larger theme: both the church and the state have corrupt practitioners.
* DownerEnding: From HeroicSacrifice: The police and the mestizo set an ObviousTrap for the priest, and the bait is a certain perspective.
dying man who wants to confess his sins. Knowing full well that he'll be captured and killed, the priest goes to visit the man anyway, because he ''can't'' let the man die with unconfessed sins on his soul.
* HopeSpot: Three notable examples, though the entire novel is full of them. The priest's first failed escape. The priest buying wine and whiskey, only to have the latter drunk, and [[spoiler:The drunk. And [[spoiler:the priest escaping over the border when it becomes clear that his presence is only putting others in danger. He then returns, knowing it's a trap, in order to do his duty.]] Throughout the novel, the priest is given the opportunity to escape, only each time something stops him.



* MyCountryRightOrWrong: The lieutenant belives this. Played with, in the case of the priest: he becomes more and more aware of the flaws of the church, but remains ferciously loyal to what it is in spirit above what it is on earth.
* NoNameGiven: Both the priest and the lieutenant.

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* MercyKill: Implied. After the priest faces the firing squad, the lieutenant walks up and shoots him one more time, in the head. Presumably, he did it to insure the priest's death wasn't too drawn out.
* MyCountryRightOrWrong: The lieutenant belives believes this. Played with, in the case of the priest: he becomes more and more aware of the flaws of the church, but remains ferciously ferociously loyal to what it is in spirit above rather than what it is on earth.
* NoNameGiven: Both the priest Several major characters just have titles rather than names. "The priest", "the lieutenant", "the mestizo", and the lieutenant. "the chief of police" (or sometimes "the ''jefe''").



* OutOfFocus: Part One jumps back and forth between a number of viewpoint characters aside from the priest: the lieutenant, Mr. Tench, Father Jose, a family reading a book about martyrs, the Fellows family. Beginning in Part Two, the priest becomes the only viewpoint character, and all those other characters (with the exception of the lieutenant) completely drop out of the story. And then they all reappear for Part Five.



* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Captain Fellows and his wife desert their plantation, and when they reappear, their daughter Coral is no longer with them. They're reluctant to talk about what happened, even among themselves, so Coral's fate remains a mystery.
* WellIntentionedExtremist: The lieutenant, trying to improve his country and its people, which he sees as in thrall to a CorruptChurch. In order to do this, he is happy to order the deaths of men he knows are perfectly innocent and randomly chosen in order to find one priest. Yet the priest believes he's a good man, as only a good man would give money to someone he thought was a worthless beggar.



* WellIntentionedExtremist: The lieutenant, trying to improve his country and its people, which he sees as in thrall to a CorruptChurch. In order to do this, he is happy to order the deaths of men he knows are perfectly innocent and randomly chosen in order to find one priest. Yet the priest believes he's a good man, as only a good man would give money to someone he thought was a worthless beggar.

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* WellIntentionedExtremist: YouCanNotKillAnIdea: The lieutenant, trying to improve his country and its people, which he sees as in thrall to a CorruptChurch. In order to do this, he is happy to order implication of the deaths of men he knows are perfectly innocent and randomly chosen in order to find one priest. Yet the final scene, where a new priest believes he's a good man, as only a good man would give money suddenly appears to someone he thought was a worthless beggar. continue God's work.
23rd Jan '16 8:41:43 AM JulianLapostat
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The novel was loosely adapted by Creator/JohnFord as ''The Fugitive'' (1947), starring Creator/HenryFonda. Greene hated the movie.

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The novel was loosely adapted by Creator/JohnFord as ''The Fugitive'' (1947), starring Creator/HenryFonda. Greene hated the movie.movie, but Ford liked it and ranks it among his best works.
27th Oct '14 3:38:20 PM AllenbysEyes
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Added DiffLines:


The novel was loosely adapted by Creator/JohnFord as ''The Fugitive'' (1947), starring Creator/HenryFonda. Greene hated the movie.
24th May '14 1:07:16 AM Lawman592
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''The Power and the Glory'' is a novel by GrahamGreene, published in 1940. It takes place in Mexico during the time when, in several states, religion (and priests) were outlawed. The hero is a nameless alcoholic priest who has decided, unlike most, to stay in Mexico as a fugitive from the state and a savior to the people. The novel is generally considered a literary masterpiece.

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''The Power and the Glory'' is a novel by GrahamGreene, Creator/GrahamGreene, published in 1940. It takes place in Mexico during the time when, in several states, religion (and priests) were outlawed. The hero is a nameless alcoholic priest who has decided, unlike most, to stay in Mexico as a fugitive from the state and a savior to the people. The novel is generally considered a literary masterpiece.
27th Feb '14 11:25:02 AM Ecclytennysmithylove
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* WhatDoYouMeanItsNotSymbolic: So. Much. Religious imagery. In keeping with the novel's theological perspective, everything has at least two meanings.
1st Apr '13 7:13:24 PM Xtifr
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Added DiffLines:

->''The lieutenant said in a tone of fury: "Well, you're going to be a martyr—you've got that satisfaction." "Oh, no. Martyrs are not like me. They don't think all the time—if I had drunk more brandy I shouldn't be so afraid." ''

''The Power and the Glory'' is a novel by GrahamGreene, published in 1940. It takes place in Mexico during the time when, in several states, religion (and priests) were outlawed. The hero is a nameless alcoholic priest who has decided, unlike most, to stay in Mexico as a fugitive from the state and a savior to the people. The novel is generally considered a literary masterpiece.
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Tropes include:

* TheAlcoholic: The priest, understandably.
* AlwaysSomeoneBetter: The priest has this view of all the other clerics who are better at their vocation than he is. Subverted, though, since ultimately he's the only one remaining in the country.
* AntiHero: the whiskey priest.
* AntiVillain: the lieutenant.
* {{Bookends}}: A mother reading stories of the saints to her children.
* CharactersAsDevice: The lieutenant, whose only role in the story is the foil to the priest.
* ChekhovsGun: The American convict; the priest baptising a (male) baby Birgitta whilst drunk.
* CorruptChurch: Playing with this is more or less the entire focus of the novel. The priest sacrifices everything to due his duty, yet charges poor people for baptisms in order to buy alcohol, is often drunk and [[spoiler: has a child]]. The saintly Bishop flees the country to preside over a cathedral in safety. The only other priest remaining, Father Jose, conforms to the demand to marry and abandons his vocation.
* DecoyProtagonist: Tench the dentist.
* DirtyCop: The Chief of Police (unknowingly) drinks (illegal) alcohol with the priest. Also a larger theme: both the church and the state have corrupt practitioners.
* DownerEnding: From a certain perspective.
* HopeSpot: Three notable examples, though the entire novel is full of them. The priest's first failed escape. The priest buying wine and whiskey, only to have the latter drunk, and [[spoiler:The priest escaping over the border when it becomes clear that his presence is only putting others in danger. He then returns, knowing it's a trap, in order to do his duty.]] Throughout the novel, the priest is given the opportunity to escape, only each time something stops him.
* HumansAreBastards: A recurring message: Every human is a sinner, and most of the sins are small and pathetic and cowardly.
* HumansAreGood: Also recurring, and because of, not in spite of, the above. Every character is a sinner, but also everyone is good.
* INeedAFreakingDrink: The priest, constantly. For two reasons: for himself, and for Communion wine.
* JumpedAtTheCall: Inverted. The priest did, for his vocation initially, yet never took it seriously and looked only for the perks. When the persecution began, he never intended to stay, yet every time he tries to leave an incident occurs that makes him realise that he is still needed. His spiritual vocation seems to just have grown at some point along the way.
* MyCountryRightOrWrong: The lieutenant belives this. Played with, in the case of the priest: he becomes more and more aware of the flaws of the church, but remains ferciously loyal to what it is in spirit above what it is on earth.
* NoNameGiven: Both the priest and the lieutenant.
* {{The Noun and the Noun}}
* PoliceState
* SecretPolice
* TheSoCalledCoward: The priest reminds everyone, at every opportunity, that he's flawed and cowardly man.
* WorthyOpponent: Played with. The lieutenant is a brave and principled man, albeit a ruthless fanatic; the priest eventually comes to see him as a good one. The priest, a good man, is eventually seen by the lieutentant as a brave and principled one.
* WellIntentionedExtremist: The lieutenant, trying to improve his country and its people, which he sees as in thrall to a CorruptChurch. In order to do this, he is happy to order the deaths of men he knows are perfectly innocent and randomly chosen in order to find one priest. Yet the priest believes he's a good man, as only a good man would give money to someone he thought was a worthless beggar.
* WhatDoYouMeanItsNotSymbolic: So. Much. Religious imagery. In keeping with the novel's theological perspective, everything has at least two meanings.
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