History Literature / TheHistories

27th Aug '16 1:25:15 AM aerojockey
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* UnusualEuphemism: Periander, the second tyrant of Corinth, killed his wife Melissa. Later, when Periander consulted her through an oracle of the dead, Melissa's ghost would not reveal the information he sought, but did reveal that "[[ILoveTheDead the oven was cold when he baked his loaves in it]]".


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* UnusualEuphemism: Periander, the second tyrant of Corinth, killed his wife Melissa. Later, when Periander consulted her through an oracle of the dead, Melissa's ghost would not reveal the information he sought, but did reveal that "[[ILoveTheDead the oven was cold when he baked his loaves in it]]".
25th Aug '16 12:35:20 PM darkpast
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** One of the Thracian tribes, the Trausians, mourn childbirth and celebrate death.



** One of the Thracian tribes, the Trausians, mourn childbirth and celebrate death.


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** "In peace, sons bury their fathers. In war, fathers bury their sons."
25th Aug '16 12:32:54 PM darkpast
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* EvilVirtues: King Darius is portrayed as ambitious and ruthless in his pursuit of power as well as despotic and arbitrary in his judgments. However, Herodotus also acknowledges his shrewd intelligence, administrative skills, the magnanimity he shows to many of his defeated opponents, his openness towards other cultures, and his willingness to provide shelter to various Greek exiles.
8th Jan '16 12:19:32 AM TARINunit9
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* TallPoppySyndrome: The tyrant Thrasybulus of Miletus cut off the tallest stalks of grain in a field when Periander of Corinth asked for advice about keeping people in line. This is probably the inspiration for Tarquin's trope naming actions.

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* TallPoppySyndrome: Periander of Corinth needs advice about keeping people in line. The tyrant Thrasybulus of Miletus offers to help but doesn't speak a word; walking out to a grain field he cut off offs the tallest stalks of grain in a field when Periander of Corinth asked for advice about keeping people in line.and throws them away. This is probably the inspiration for Tarquin's trope naming actions.
4th Oct '15 6:53:36 AM LordGro
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* RagsToRiches: Herodotus relates that the famous courtesan Rhodopis of Naucratis was originally a Thracian slave sold into Egypt, where she was bought and set free by the merchant Charaxus on account of her beauty. Shen then becomes a 'hetaira' (courtesan), a business which makes her rich and so famous "that every Greek knew the name of Rhodopis". Some even say she was so fantastically wealthy that she had a pyramid built for herself, but Herodotus rejects this as a ludicrous exaggeration.
23rd Sep '15 11:27:33 PM Fireblood
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-> "As a matter of fact, according to what I hear, the Hellenes are in the habit of starting wars without the slightest forethought, out of obstinacy and stupidity... What they ought to do, since they speak the same language and use heralds and messengers, is to thus put an end to their differences and employ means other than battles to become reconciled... Thus the Hellenes do not employ intelligent strategies..." - Mardonios

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-> --> "As a matter of fact, according to what I hear, the Hellenes are in the habit of starting wars without the slightest forethought, out of obstinacy and stupidity... What they ought to do, since they speak the same language and use heralds and messengers, is to thus put an end to their differences and employ means other than battles to become reconciled... Thus the Hellenes do not employ intelligent strategies..." - Mardonios



** For instance, Xerxes had nothing against Hellas (Ancient Greece) until someone persistently convinced him to invade - and it was primarily that one advisor who stood to gain anything. Xerxes also had multiple chances to cancel the war, and even cancelled it verbally once, but was pushed on by the need to appear to be a strong king.
* RedemptionEqualsDeath: Inverted - Cambyses is mortally wounded from an accident and consequently confesses to one of his plots.

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** For instance, Xerxes had nothing against Hellas (Ancient Greece) until someone persistently convinced him to invade - and it was primarily that one advisor adviser who stood to gain anything. Xerxes also had multiple chances to cancel the war, and even cancelled it verbally once, but was pushed on by the need to appear to be a strong king.
* RedemptionEqualsDeath: Inverted {{Inverted}} - Cambyses is mortally wounded from an accident and consequently confesses to one of his plots.



** Although there is some lampshading in all the times the oracle gets bribed.
* YouKilledMyFather: Lykophros refuses to have anything to do wth his father Periandros or the inheritance, for Periandros had killed his wife Melissa (Lykophros' mother).

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** Although there is some lampshading in of all the times the oracle gets bribed.
* YouKilledMyFather: Lykophros refuses to have anything to do wth with his father Periandros or the inheritance, for Periandros had killed his wife Melissa (Lykophros' mother).
4th Aug '15 8:23:38 AM tenryufan
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* ScienceMarchesOn: Herodotus describes the world as flat.
** Whether it was the Egyptians or the Phrygians who were the first humans, and the method by which this was ascertained.
** The explanation for why Egyptians and Persians would have such differing thicknesses for their skulls. Nowadays, we would know this is because of nutrition, matching accounts of early Persians being relatively impoverished.
** However, one story he relates is interesting. The Phoenecians claimed to have sailed around the tip of Africa, from the Indian Ocean to the Mediterranean, and they say the Sun was on their right side while passing the southernmost point. Herodotus dismisses the claim, but this is exactly what actually happens: the Sun is found in the northern sky in the Southern Hemisphere.
6th Jul '15 4:15:37 AM pvsage
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* ArtisticLicenseHistory: Something Herdotus is prone to in his account of the Near Eastern empires. Examples:
** Herodotus has Khufu (a.k.a. Cheops, the king who built the Great Pyramid) living at around 900 BC or so. Khufu actually lived around 2500 BC. Herodotus claims Khufu was a cruel tyrant but modern historical evidence suggests Khufu was well loved and his reign prosperous.
** There was probably no "Median empire", not if the contemporary literary and archeological evidence is anything to go by. Medes, yes, but they were probably more like a patchwork of tribes and city-states that miiiight have been on the road to forming an empire.



* HistoryMarchesOn: Something Herdotus is prone to in his account of the Near Eastern empires. Examples:
** Herodotus has Khufu (a.k.a. Cheops, the king who built the Great Pyramid) living at around 900 BC or so. Khufu actually lived around 2500 BC. Herodotus claims Khufu was a cruel tyrant but modern historical evidence suggests Khufu was well loved and his reign prosperous.
** There was probably no "Median empire", not if the contemporary literary and archeological evidence is anything to go by. Medes, yes, but they were probably more like a patchwork of tribes and city-states that miiiight have been on the road to forming an empire.
6th Apr '15 6:50:00 PM jormis29
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Herodotus is the main source on the GrecoPersianWars, as well as one of the only surviving sources on many other matters. His book is what gives the word 'history' the sense of an account of the past. As such, Herodotus is often considered to be the Father of History.

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Herodotus is the main source on the GrecoPersianWars, UsefulNotes/GrecoPersianWars, as well as one of the only surviving sources on many other matters. His book is what gives the word 'history' the sense of an account of the past. As such, Herodotus is often considered to be the Father of History.
7th Nov '14 5:04:06 AM Patachou
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* TheCaligula: Cambyses, son of CyrusTheGreat comes across as this. Married his own sisters? Check. Flipped out and killed people all the time? Check. Bad at strategy? Check.

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* TheCaligula: Cambyses, son of CyrusTheGreat UsefulNotes/CyrusTheGreat comes across as this. Married his own sisters? Check. Flipped out and killed people all the time? Check. Bad at strategy? Check.
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