History Literature / TheGreatGatsby

28th Feb '17 9:01:16 AM NyxShadowhawk
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* SettingUpdate: ''Cena Trimalchionis'' recycled IN ROARING-TWENTIES NEW YORK! F. Scott Fitzgerald even intended to call the book ''Trimalchio in West Egg'' until he was persuaded that his readers [[GeniusBonus wouldn't get it]].

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* SettingUpdate: ''Cena Trimalchionis'' recycled [[RecycledinSpace IN ROARING-TWENTIES NEW YORK! YORK!]] F. Scott Fitzgerald even intended to call the book ''Trimalchio in West Egg'' until he was persuaded that his readers [[GeniusBonus wouldn't get it]].
12th Jan '17 9:48:57 AM mlsmithca
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* FourTemperamentEnsemble:
##Jay Gatsby (leukine)
##Tom Buchanan (choleric)
##George Wilson (melancholic)
##Nick Carraway (phlegmatic)
##Myrtle Wilson (sanguine)
##Jordan Baker (choleric/melancholic)
##Daisy Buchanan (sanguine/choleric)
##Meyer Wolfsheim (phlegmatic/sanguine).
8th Jan '17 7:37:46 PM KingLyger
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* ByronicHero: Gatsby.

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* ByronicHero: Gatsby. Ultimately obsessed with self-image and fixated on a TragicDream.



* DaydreamBeliever: Gatsby really believes that millionaires are GentlemanAdventurer[=s=] and his MultipleChoicePast are stories everyone thinks are ridiculous… at first. But given Gatsby is TheCharmer, he manages to make others believe, even for a little while, in his story. In chapter 4, he is confessing his past with the skeptical Nick:

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* DaydreamBeliever: Gatsby really believes that millionaires are GentlemanAdventurer[=s=] {{Gentleman Adventurer}}s and his MultipleChoicePast are stories everyone thinks are ridiculous… at first. But given Gatsby is TheCharmer, he manages to make others believe, even for a little while, in his story. In chapter 4, he is confessing his past with the skeptical Nick:



* {{Deconstruction}}: Of the American Dream lifestyle.

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* {{Deconstruction}}: Of the American Dream lifestyle.lifestyle, of the IdleRich, and of the idea of everlasting love.



** [[spoiler:Gatsby]] crosses this line when [[spoiler:Daisy rejects him]].

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** [[spoiler:Gatsby]] [[spoiler:Gatsby crosses this line when [[spoiler:Daisy Daisy rejects him]].



** [[spoiler:Daisy]] has crossed this since before the events of the book, and spends her time either trying to climb out of it or deny it entirely.
* {{Determinator}}: Say what you will about the lengths he went to to pursue it, Gatsby never gives up on his dream of winning Daisy.

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** [[spoiler:Daisy]] Daisy has crossed this since before the events of the book, and spends her time either trying to climb out of it or deny it entirely.
* {{Determinator}}: Say what you will about the lengths he went to to pursue it, Gatsby never gives up on his dream of winning Daisy.Daisy's heart.



* DownerEnding: [[spoiler:In the end, Gatsby is framed by Tom for Myrtle's death and is in turn killed by her vengeful husband. Daisy decides to stay with Tom, and Tom [[KarmaHoudini gets away with being indirectly responsible for Gatsby's death]], while they are doomed to be stuck in a loveless marriage. Nick becomes so disgusted with the whole affair that he essentially cuts ties with Tom and Daisy and leaves New York.]]

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* DownerEnding: [[spoiler:In the end, Gatsby [[spoiler:Gatsby is framed by Tom for Myrtle's death death, and is in turn killed by her vengeful husband. Daisy decides to stay with Tom, and Tom [[KarmaHoudini gets away with being indirectly responsible for Gatsby's death]], while they are doomed to be stuck in a loveless marriage. Nick becomes so disgusted with the whole affair that he essentially cuts ties with Tom and Daisy and leaves New York.]]



** Daisy turns out to be a bad driver too, [[spoiler:driving over Myrtle--although she ''did'' run right out in front of the car]].

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** Daisy turns out to be a bad driver too, [[spoiler:driving over Myrtle--although she Myrtle ''did'' run right out in front of the car]].



* FlowerMotifs: The biggest example being Daisy's name

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* FlowerMotifs: The biggest example being Daisy's namename.



** Daisy. She married Tom for his money and Old Money status, which makes him an equivalent of aristocracy.

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** Daisy. She married Tom for his money and Old Money status, which makes him an equivalent of aristocracy.



* IdleRich: Deconstructed with Tom and Daisy: Sure, they don't work, but they are constantly chased by all kinds of [[ConMan conmen]] (Biloxi), [[TheThingThatWouldNotLeave freeloaders]] (Clipspringer) and NouveauRiche (Gatsby). Without a job, they have plenty of time for RichBoredom. Both of them are LonelyAtTheTop, they cheat each other, Tom is clinging to his GloryDays as a football hero because he knows he will never top that, and Daisy is a StepfordSmiler.

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* IdleRich: Deconstructed with Tom and Daisy: Daisy. Sure, they don't work, but they are constantly chased by all kinds of [[ConMan conmen]] (Biloxi), [[TheThingThatWouldNotLeave freeloaders]] (Clipspringer) and NouveauRiche (Gatsby). Without a job, they have plenty of time for RichBoredom. Both of them are LonelyAtTheTop, they cheat each other, Tom is clinging to his GloryDays as a football hero because he knows he will never top that, and Daisy is a StepfordSmiler.



* JerkJock: Tom is a former athlete and a total jerk.

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* JerkJock: Tom is a former athlete and a total jerk. Nick describes him as a man looking for another football game to win.
6th Nov '16 9:12:02 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* JerkJock: Tom is the embodiment of this trope.

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* JerkJock: Tom is the embodiment of this trope.a former athlete and a total jerk.
6th Nov '16 9:10:30 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* AdaptationDyeJob:
** In most film versions, Daisy will be blonde and Jordan will be brunette. In the book, Daisy's dark-haired ("her dark shining hair") and Jordan's a dark blond ("the autumn-leaf yellow of her hair").
** Likewise, Tom is blond ("straw haired man") in the book, but usually portrayed with brown or dark hair.
* AdaptationalHeroism: Most adaptations portray Daisy more sympathetically, giving her extra scenes or lines to suggest her feelings for Gatsby are genuine; the novel implies she is as incapable of love as her husband, and simply clings to whoever's stronger and [[GoldDigger richer.]]
6th Nov '16 4:37:06 AM Comrade_Mabby
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He ends up next-door neighbors with Jay Gatsby: an enigmatic man who makes sure to flaunt his wealth to everyone by building a lavish mansion near Nick's home and throwing completely over-the-top weekly parties to which everyone who's anyone will come… but seeming, himself, mysteriously detached from it all. However, Gatsby has a long past with Daisy Buchanan, and many other, murkier secrets; and Nick finds himself continually thrust into the middle of a highly charged romantic triangle where money, passion, and sheer force of will battle it out, with lives lost and wasted as the result.

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He ends up next-door neighbors with Jay Gatsby: an enigmatic man who makes sure to flaunt his wealth to everyone by building buying a lavish mansion near Nick's home and throwing completely over-the-top weekly parties to which everyone who's anyone will come… but seeming, himself, mysteriously detached from it all. However, Gatsby has a long past with Daisy Buchanan, and many other, murkier secrets; and Nick finds himself continually thrust into the middle of a highly charged romantic triangle where money, passion, and sheer force of will battle it out, with lives lost and wasted as the result.
11th Aug '16 6:17:10 PM Typos
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** Daisy turns out to be a bad driver too, [[spoiler:driving over Myrtle--although she ''did' run right out in front of the car]].

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** Daisy turns out to be a bad driver too, [[spoiler:driving over Myrtle--although she ''did' ''did'' run right out in front of the car]].car]].
** Tom and his first affair partner were discovered when they got into a car accident during his and Daisy's honeymoon.
1st Jul '16 1:39:10 PM Anddrix
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* TheFilmOfTheBook: Several, although none have been hailed as masterpieces. The 1974 version with Creator/RobertRedford is the best-regarded, though many criticize it as too literal an adaptation. Few have seen the 1949 version (because it's unavailable), which conversely is a loose adaptation. Creator/BazLuhrmann's faithful, but heavily stylized 2013 take has proven [[BaseBreaker extremely polarizing]]. The introspective nature of the book is hard to translate onto film, and some of Gatsby's grand romantic gestures tend to come off as incredibly affected. His habit of calling his friends 'old sport' ''is'' affected, especially notable when he's nervous or feeling downtrodden (especially in the scene where he's reunited with Daisy by Nick). Additionally, the films struggle depicting Fitzgerald's symbolism like T.J. Eckelberg's billboard and the flashing green light without seeming forced.

to:

* TheFilmOfTheBook: Several, although none have been hailed as masterpieces. The 1974 version with Creator/RobertRedford is the best-regarded, though many criticize it as too literal an adaptation. Few have seen the 1949 version (because it's unavailable), which conversely is a loose adaptation. Creator/BazLuhrmann's faithful, but heavily stylized 2013 take has proven [[BaseBreaker extremely polarizing]].polarizing. The introspective nature of the book is hard to translate onto film, and some of Gatsby's grand romantic gestures tend to come off as incredibly affected. His habit of calling his friends 'old sport' ''is'' affected, especially notable when he's nervous or feeling downtrodden (especially in the scene where he's reunited with Daisy by Nick). Additionally, the films struggle depicting Fitzgerald's symbolism like T.J. Eckelberg's billboard and the flashing green light without seeming forced.
29th Jun '16 5:33:18 PM Dragon-Kid
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** Only three people who weren't employed by Gatsby bother to show up at his funeral: Nick (the narrator), Gatsby's father, and one party guest (out of literally hundreds). In addition, Gatsby is secluded from social life, only bothering to converse with someone who either is or is close to Daisy at one of his parties.

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** Only three people who weren't employed by Gatsby bother to show up at his funeral: Nick (the narrator), Gatsby's father, and one party guest (out of literally hundreds). In addition, Gatsby is secluded from social life, only bothering to converse with someone who either is or is close to Daisy at one of his parties. As a result, Gatsby himself [[Pantheon/{{Sadness}} is the epitome of the trope]].



** [[Pantheon/{{Sadness}} Gatsby himself is the epitome of the trope]].
29th Jun '16 5:31:18 PM Dragon-Kid
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Added DiffLines:

** [[Pantheon/{{Sadness}} Gatsby himself is the epitome of the trope]].
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