History Literature / TheGreatGatsby

6th Nov '16 9:12:02 AM CaptainCrawdad
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* JerkJock: Tom is the embodiment of this trope.

to:

* JerkJock: Tom is the embodiment of this trope.a former athlete and a total jerk.
6th Nov '16 9:10:30 AM CaptainCrawdad
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AdaptationDyeJob:
** In most film versions, Daisy will be blonde and Jordan will be brunette. In the book, Daisy's dark-haired ("her dark shining hair") and Jordan's a dark blond ("the autumn-leaf yellow of her hair").
** Likewise, Tom is blond ("straw haired man") in the book, but usually portrayed with brown or dark hair.
* AdaptationalHeroism: Most adaptations portray Daisy more sympathetically, giving her extra scenes or lines to suggest her feelings for Gatsby are genuine; the novel implies she is as incapable of love as her husband, and simply clings to whoever's stronger and [[GoldDigger richer.]]
6th Nov '16 4:37:06 AM Comrade_Mabby
Is there an issue? Send a Message


He ends up next-door neighbors with Jay Gatsby: an enigmatic man who makes sure to flaunt his wealth to everyone by building a lavish mansion near Nick's home and throwing completely over-the-top weekly parties to which everyone who's anyone will come… but seeming, himself, mysteriously detached from it all. However, Gatsby has a long past with Daisy Buchanan, and many other, murkier secrets; and Nick finds himself continually thrust into the middle of a highly charged romantic triangle where money, passion, and sheer force of will battle it out, with lives lost and wasted as the result.

to:

He ends up next-door neighbors with Jay Gatsby: an enigmatic man who makes sure to flaunt his wealth to everyone by building buying a lavish mansion near Nick's home and throwing completely over-the-top weekly parties to which everyone who's anyone will come… but seeming, himself, mysteriously detached from it all. However, Gatsby has a long past with Daisy Buchanan, and many other, murkier secrets; and Nick finds himself continually thrust into the middle of a highly charged romantic triangle where money, passion, and sheer force of will battle it out, with lives lost and wasted as the result.
11th Aug '16 6:17:10 PM Typos
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Daisy turns out to be a bad driver too, [[spoiler:driving over Myrtle--although she ''did' run right out in front of the car]].

to:

** Daisy turns out to be a bad driver too, [[spoiler:driving over Myrtle--although she ''did' ''did'' run right out in front of the car]].car]].
** Tom and his first affair partner were discovered when they got into a car accident during his and Daisy's honeymoon.
1st Jul '16 1:39:10 PM Anddrix
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TheFilmOfTheBook: Several, although none have been hailed as masterpieces. The 1974 version with Creator/RobertRedford is the best-regarded, though many criticize it as too literal an adaptation. Few have seen the 1949 version (because it's unavailable), which conversely is a loose adaptation. Creator/BazLuhrmann's faithful, but heavily stylized 2013 take has proven [[BaseBreaker extremely polarizing]]. The introspective nature of the book is hard to translate onto film, and some of Gatsby's grand romantic gestures tend to come off as incredibly affected. His habit of calling his friends 'old sport' ''is'' affected, especially notable when he's nervous or feeling downtrodden (especially in the scene where he's reunited with Daisy by Nick). Additionally, the films struggle depicting Fitzgerald's symbolism like T.J. Eckelberg's billboard and the flashing green light without seeming forced.

to:

* TheFilmOfTheBook: Several, although none have been hailed as masterpieces. The 1974 version with Creator/RobertRedford is the best-regarded, though many criticize it as too literal an adaptation. Few have seen the 1949 version (because it's unavailable), which conversely is a loose adaptation. Creator/BazLuhrmann's faithful, but heavily stylized 2013 take has proven [[BaseBreaker extremely polarizing]].polarizing. The introspective nature of the book is hard to translate onto film, and some of Gatsby's grand romantic gestures tend to come off as incredibly affected. His habit of calling his friends 'old sport' ''is'' affected, especially notable when he's nervous or feeling downtrodden (especially in the scene where he's reunited with Daisy by Nick). Additionally, the films struggle depicting Fitzgerald's symbolism like T.J. Eckelberg's billboard and the flashing green light without seeming forced.
29th Jun '16 5:33:18 PM Dragon-Kid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Only three people who weren't employed by Gatsby bother to show up at his funeral: Nick (the narrator), Gatsby's father, and one party guest (out of literally hundreds). In addition, Gatsby is secluded from social life, only bothering to converse with someone who either is or is close to Daisy at one of his parties.

to:

** Only three people who weren't employed by Gatsby bother to show up at his funeral: Nick (the narrator), Gatsby's father, and one party guest (out of literally hundreds). In addition, Gatsby is secluded from social life, only bothering to converse with someone who either is or is close to Daisy at one of his parties. As a result, Gatsby himself [[Pantheon/{{Sadness}} is the epitome of the trope]].



** [[Pantheon/{{Sadness}} Gatsby himself is the epitome of the trope]].
29th Jun '16 5:31:18 PM Dragon-Kid
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** [[Pantheon/{{Sadness}} Gatsby himself is the epitome of the trope]].
29th May '16 12:36:55 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Likewise, Tom is [[BlondGuysAreEvil blond]] ("straw haired man") in the book, but usually portrayed with brown or dark hair.

to:

** Likewise, Tom is [[BlondGuysAreEvil blond]] blond ("straw haired man") in the book, but usually portrayed with brown or dark hair.
6th May '16 7:23:18 PM slvstrChung
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* JadeColoredGlasses

to:

** Nick and Jordan. Downplayed. It's safe to assume she is from a higher economic bracket than he--she's a professional golfer, grew up friends with Daisy and is able to share in the Buchanans' rich carelessness, whilst he is from the Midwest, works in finance and lives in a bungalow in "the comforting proximity of millionaires"--but there's no ''canon'' discussion of their monetary status.
* JadeColoredGlassesJadeColoredGlasses: most characters have them in one way or another, excepting Gatsby (and that's arguably his FatalFlaw). Nick's CharacterDevelopment over the course of the story is about learning to wear them.



* KarmaHoudini: When his mistress is killed, Tom directs her suicidally mournful husband to Gatsby. Meanwhile, Tom and Daisy? Drift off to Chicago, leaving the entire unholy mess behind. However, it is implied that their relationship has been ruined by the whole experience. This is one of the themes of the novel: That the rich make a huge mess and leave, making others clean it up.
** Daisy as well: She's driving the car when it kills Myrtle. Gatsby offers to lie that he was at the wheel instead, and she allows him to take the blame.

to:

* KarmaHoudini: When his mistress is killed, Tom directs her suicidally mournful suicidally-mournful husband to Gatsby. Meanwhile, Tom and Daisy? Drift off to Chicago, leaving the entire unholy mess behind. However, it is implied that their relationship has been ruined by the whole experience. This is one of the themes of the novel: That the rich make a huge mess and leave, making leave others to clean it up.
** Daisy as well: She's driving the car when it kills Myrtle. Gatsby offers to lie that he was at the wheel instead, and which she allows lets him to take the blame.do.
29th Apr '16 11:50:59 PM AtmosBlitzer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Nick, in proportion as his cynicism grows. He keeps it largely to himself, though, save a few moments in the opening scenes:

to:

** Nick, in proportion as his cynicism grows. [[FirstPersonSmartass He keeps it largely to himself, though, though,]] save a few moments in the opening scenes:
This list shows the last 10 events of 227. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheGreatGatsby