History Literature / TheGreatGatsby

11th Aug '16 6:17:10 PM Typos
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** Daisy turns out to be a bad driver too, [[spoiler:driving over Myrtle--although she ''did' run right out in front of the car]].

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** Daisy turns out to be a bad driver too, [[spoiler:driving over Myrtle--although she ''did' ''did'' run right out in front of the car]].car]].
** Tom and his first affair partner were discovered when they got into a car accident during his and Daisy's honeymoon.
1st Jul '16 1:39:10 PM Anddrix
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* TheFilmOfTheBook: Several, although none have been hailed as masterpieces. The 1974 version with Creator/RobertRedford is the best-regarded, though many criticize it as too literal an adaptation. Few have seen the 1949 version (because it's unavailable), which conversely is a loose adaptation. Creator/BazLuhrmann's faithful, but heavily stylized 2013 take has proven [[BaseBreaker extremely polarizing]]. The introspective nature of the book is hard to translate onto film, and some of Gatsby's grand romantic gestures tend to come off as incredibly affected. His habit of calling his friends 'old sport' ''is'' affected, especially notable when he's nervous or feeling downtrodden (especially in the scene where he's reunited with Daisy by Nick). Additionally, the films struggle depicting Fitzgerald's symbolism like T.J. Eckelberg's billboard and the flashing green light without seeming forced.

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* TheFilmOfTheBook: Several, although none have been hailed as masterpieces. The 1974 version with Creator/RobertRedford is the best-regarded, though many criticize it as too literal an adaptation. Few have seen the 1949 version (because it's unavailable), which conversely is a loose adaptation. Creator/BazLuhrmann's faithful, but heavily stylized 2013 take has proven [[BaseBreaker extremely polarizing]].polarizing. The introspective nature of the book is hard to translate onto film, and some of Gatsby's grand romantic gestures tend to come off as incredibly affected. His habit of calling his friends 'old sport' ''is'' affected, especially notable when he's nervous or feeling downtrodden (especially in the scene where he's reunited with Daisy by Nick). Additionally, the films struggle depicting Fitzgerald's symbolism like T.J. Eckelberg's billboard and the flashing green light without seeming forced.
29th Jun '16 5:33:18 PM Dragon-Kid
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** Only three people who weren't employed by Gatsby bother to show up at his funeral: Nick (the narrator), Gatsby's father, and one party guest (out of literally hundreds). In addition, Gatsby is secluded from social life, only bothering to converse with someone who either is or is close to Daisy at one of his parties.

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** Only three people who weren't employed by Gatsby bother to show up at his funeral: Nick (the narrator), Gatsby's father, and one party guest (out of literally hundreds). In addition, Gatsby is secluded from social life, only bothering to converse with someone who either is or is close to Daisy at one of his parties. As a result, Gatsby himself [[Pantheon/{{Sadness}} is the epitome of the trope]].



** [[Pantheon/{{Sadness}} Gatsby himself is the epitome of the trope]].
29th Jun '16 5:31:18 PM Dragon-Kid
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Added DiffLines:

** [[Pantheon/{{Sadness}} Gatsby himself is the epitome of the trope]].
29th May '16 12:36:55 PM Morgenthaler
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** Likewise, Tom is [[BlondGuysAreEvil blond]] ("straw haired man") in the book, but usually portrayed with brown or dark hair.

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** Likewise, Tom is [[BlondGuysAreEvil blond]] blond ("straw haired man") in the book, but usually portrayed with brown or dark hair.
6th May '16 7:23:18 PM slvstrChung
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* JadeColoredGlasses

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** Nick and Jordan. Downplayed. It's safe to assume she is from a higher economic bracket than he--she's a professional golfer, grew up friends with Daisy and is able to share in the Buchanans' rich carelessness, whilst he is from the Midwest, works in finance and lives in a bungalow in "the comforting proximity of millionaires"--but there's no ''canon'' discussion of their monetary status.
* JadeColoredGlassesJadeColoredGlasses: most characters have them in one way or another, excepting Gatsby (and that's arguably his FatalFlaw). Nick's CharacterDevelopment over the course of the story is about learning to wear them.



* KarmaHoudini: When his mistress is killed, Tom directs her suicidally mournful husband to Gatsby. Meanwhile, Tom and Daisy? Drift off to Chicago, leaving the entire unholy mess behind. However, it is implied that their relationship has been ruined by the whole experience. This is one of the themes of the novel: That the rich make a huge mess and leave, making others clean it up.
** Daisy as well: She's driving the car when it kills Myrtle. Gatsby offers to lie that he was at the wheel instead, and she allows him to take the blame.

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* KarmaHoudini: When his mistress is killed, Tom directs her suicidally mournful suicidally-mournful husband to Gatsby. Meanwhile, Tom and Daisy? Drift off to Chicago, leaving the entire unholy mess behind. However, it is implied that their relationship has been ruined by the whole experience. This is one of the themes of the novel: That the rich make a huge mess and leave, making leave others to clean it up.
** Daisy as well: She's driving the car when it kills Myrtle. Gatsby offers to lie that he was at the wheel instead, and which she allows lets him to take the blame.do.
29th Apr '16 11:50:59 PM AtmosBlitzer
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** Nick, in proportion as his cynicism grows. He keeps it largely to himself, though, save a few moments in the opening scenes:

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** Nick, in proportion as his cynicism grows. [[FirstPersonSmartass He keeps it largely to himself, though, though,]] save a few moments in the opening scenes:
21st Apr '16 8:23:49 AM Eievie
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* KissingCousins: Daisy gives off this vibe towards Nick early in the novel. It's worth noting that this is a case not based from attraction or sexual desire. People like Nick--in his late twenties without a wife or girlfriend to speak of--were often MistakenForGay in those days. On the absence of a significant other, he kissed Daisy in order to duck any gossip that might be spread about him (considering they are at a party). None of the partygoers would be savvy about Nick's relation to Daisy.

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* KissingCousins: Daisy gives off this vibe towards Nick early in the novel. It's worth noting that this is a case not based from attraction or sexual desire. People like Nick--in his late twenties without a wife or girlfriend to speak of--were often MistakenForGay in those days. On the absence of a significant other, he kissed Daisy in order to duck any gossip that might be spread about him (considering they are at a party). None of the partygoers would be savvy about Nick's relation to Daisy. Also, they're second cousins once removed--not a super close relation.
-->''"Are you in love with me," she said low in my ear, "or why did I have to come alone."''
15th Apr '16 1:21:41 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot: With Gatsby's passion and determination, he could have just as easily made his money through legal means, and if he could have just let Daisy go [[spoiler:he would have been alive long enough to enjoy his success]].
7th Apr '16 10:32:05 AM Eievie
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He ends up next-door neighbors with Jay Gatsby: an enigmatic man who makes sure to flaunt his wealth to everyone by building a lavish mansion near Nick's home and throwing completely over-the-top weekly parties to which everyone who's anyone will come... but seeming, himself, mysteriously detached from it all. However, Gatsby has a long past with Daisy Buchanan, and many other, murkier secrets; and Nick finds himself continually thrust into the middle of a highly charged romantic triangle where money, passion, and sheer force of will battle it out, with lives lost and wasted as the result.

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He ends up next-door neighbors with Jay Gatsby: an enigmatic man who makes sure to flaunt his wealth to everyone by building a lavish mansion near Nick's home and throwing completely over-the-top weekly parties to which everyone who's anyone will come... come… but seeming, himself, mysteriously detached from it all. However, Gatsby has a long past with Daisy Buchanan, and many other, murkier secrets; and Nick finds himself continually thrust into the middle of a highly charged romantic triangle where money, passion, and sheer force of will battle it out, with lives lost and wasted as the result.



* DaydreamBeliever: Gatsby really believes that millionaires are GentlemanAdventurer[=s=] and his MultipleChoicePast are stories everyone thinks are ridiculous... at first. But given Gatsby is TheCharmer, he manages to make others believe, even for a little while, in his story. In chapter 4, he is confessing his past with the skeptical Nick:

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* DaydreamBeliever: Gatsby really believes that millionaires are GentlemanAdventurer[=s=] and his MultipleChoicePast are stories everyone thinks are ridiculous... ridiculous… at first. But given Gatsby is TheCharmer, he manages to make others believe, even for a little while, in his story. In chapter 4, he is confessing his past with the skeptical Nick:



With an effort I managed to restrain my incredulous laughter. [[ClicheStorm The very phrases were worn so threadbare]] that they evoked no image except that of a turbaned "character" leaking sawdust at every pore as he pursued a tiger through the Bois de Boulogne... My incredulity was submerged in fascination now; it was like skimming hastily through a dozen magazines.''

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With an effort I managed to restrain my incredulous laughter. [[ClicheStorm The very phrases were worn so threadbare]] that they evoked no image except that of a turbaned "character" leaking sawdust at every pore as he pursued a tiger through the Bois de Boulogne... Boulogne… My incredulity was submerged in fascination now; it was like skimming hastily through a dozen magazines.''



** The other (minor) car crash mentioned--Tom Buchanan was involved in a car accident... with a chambermaid in the passenger seat. These incidents tend to reveal adultery, don't they?

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** The other (minor) car crash mentioned--Tom Buchanan was involved in a car accident... accident… with a chambermaid in the passenger seat. These incidents tend to reveal adultery, don't they?



-->''"I suppose the latest thing is to sit back and let Mr. Nobody from Nowhere make love to your wife. Well, if that's the idea you can count me out... Nowadays people begin by sneering at family life and family institutions and next [[UpToEleven they'll throw everything overboard and]] [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain have intermarriage between black and white."]]\\

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-->''"I suppose the latest thing is to sit back and let Mr. Nobody from Nowhere make love to your wife. Well, if that's the idea you can count me out... out… Nowadays people begin by sneering at family life and family institutions and next [[UpToEleven they'll throw everything overboard and]] [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain have intermarriage between black and white."]]\\



What he really said was, "Yes... yes... all right."''

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What he really said was, "Yes... yes... "Yes… yes… all right."''



* LoveDodecahedron: Gatsby has his heart set on Daisy, who's married to Tom, who's conducting an open affair with Myrtle, who herself is married to George, who later on believes that Gatsby is responsible for killing Myrtle...

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* LoveDodecahedron: Gatsby has his heart set on Daisy, who's married to Tom, who's conducting an open affair with Myrtle, who herself is married to George, who later on believes that Gatsby is responsible for killing Myrtle...Myrtle…



** Daisy Fay. "Fay" has rather [[TheFairFolk unpleasant connotations.]] Also, her daughter's name, Pamela, not only refers to a very sentimental and idealistic novel by Samuel Richardson, but refers to Daisy herself--it means literally "all honey." And then there's Gatsby himself; "Gat" is a slang term for a gun...

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** Daisy Fay. "Fay" has rather [[TheFairFolk unpleasant connotations.]] Also, her daughter's name, Pamela, not only refers to a very sentimental and idealistic novel by Samuel Richardson, but refers to Daisy herself--it means literally "all honey." And then there's Gatsby himself; "Gat" is a slang term for a gun...gun…



* RuleOfSymbolism: Most famously--and unsubtly--"the eyes of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg" on an abandoned billboard along the highway the characters all travel. The eyes of God! And the green light is the American Dream! And... and the ashfields represent the gaps between humanity and the evil of consumerism! [[EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory And hell!]]

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* RuleOfSymbolism: Most famously--and unsubtly--"the eyes of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg" on an abandoned billboard along the highway the characters all travel. The eyes of God! And the green light is the American Dream! And... And… and the ashfields represent the gaps between humanity and the evil of consumerism! [[EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory And hell!]]



* SlowlySlippingIntoEvil: subverted, and the subversion discussed. After Nick agrees to help Gatsby reunite with Daisy, Gatsby offers him some form of employment in his shady enterprises. Nick, in the narration, admits that this would have been a very serious WhatYouAreInTheDark moment... if he wasn't already planning on taking the "ThinkNothingOfIt" route.

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* SlowlySlippingIntoEvil: subverted, Subverted, and the subversion discussed. After Nick agrees to help Gatsby reunite with Daisy, Gatsby offers him some form of employment in his shady enterprises. Nick, in the narration, admits that this would have been a very serious WhatYouAreInTheDark moment... moment… if he wasn't already planning on taking the "ThinkNothingOfIt" route.



Gatsby believed [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanDream in the green light, the orgastic future]] [[YankTheDogsChain that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then]], [[ScrewDestiny but that’s no matter]]--[[HopeSpot to-morrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther... And one fine morning--]]\\

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Gatsby believed [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanDream in the green light, the orgastic future]] [[YankTheDogsChain that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then]], [[ScrewDestiny but that’s no matter]]--[[HopeSpot to-morrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther... farther… And one fine morning--]]\\
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