History Literature / TheFourGospels

20th Jul '16 6:00:23 AM morenohijazo
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* DiseaseByAnyOtherName: Some commentators have speculated that cases of demonic possession dealt with by Jesus show symptoms we would recognize today as epilepsy or mental disorders.
10th Jun '16 9:37:30 PM DoctorCooper
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* JesusTaboo: [[CaptainObvious Averted]].
11th May '16 2:43:27 PM Jeduthun
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* GoodIsNotNice: Jesus says "[[MartialPacifist I come not to bring peace but a sword]]." (A metaphorical one--it was not yet the time for actual swords.)
** Note of course that the idea that Jesus ever intended his followers to EVER use swords is one of many interpretations. Many Christians, in light of the very pacifistic teachings found elsewhere in the Gospels (including this one) take this to be an ENTIRELY and CONTINUALLY metaphorical sword. Noting that the sword is used as a metaphor for non-violent "separation" elsewhere including in the writings of Paul (the Word of God is "sharper than a two-edged sword", separating bone from marrow), and Jesus' discussion elsewhere that all things including family must be abandoned for the Kingdom of God, the sword may have no literal meaning at all. A third option is that the sword is a prophesy of the violence that would follow but not an endorsement. Considering the only time any disciple is ever recording USING a sword draws a quick and sharp rebuke from Jesus himself, it is not a stretch to read the text this way.

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* GoodIsNotNice: Jesus says "[[MartialPacifist I come not to bring peace but a sword]]." (A (Though considering the [[TurnTheOtherCheek pacifistic inclination]] of Jesus' other teachings, many Christians interpret this as a metaphorical one--it was not yet the time for actual swords.)
** Note of course that the idea that Jesus ever intended his followers to EVER use swords is one of many interpretations. Many Christians, in light of the very pacifistic teachings found elsewhere in the Gospels (including this one) take this to be an ENTIRELY and CONTINUALLY metaphorical sword. Noting that the sword is used as a metaphor for non-violent "separation" elsewhere including in the writings of Paul (the Word of God is "sharper than a two-edged sword", separating bone from marrow), and Jesus' discussion elsewhere that all things including family must be abandoned for the Kingdom of God, the sword may have no literal meaning at all. A third option is that the sword is a prophesy of the violence that would follow but not an endorsement. Considering the only time any disciple is ever recording USING a sword draws a quick and sharp rebuke from Jesus himself, it is not a stretch to read the text this way.
sword.)



* GoodShepherd: Jesus, of course.
* [[GratuitousFrench Gratuitous Aramaic]]: The New Testament was largely written Koine Greek, except for the occasional Aramaic phrase (translated into Greek for convenience). The most famous of these is Jesus' cry from the cross:

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* GoodShepherd: Jesus, of course.
course, [[IAmTheNoun claims this title for Himself]].
* [[GratuitousFrench [[GratuitousForeignLanguage Gratuitous Aramaic]]: The New Testament was largely written Koine Greek, except for the occasional Aramaic phrase (translated into Greek for convenience). The most famous of these is Jesus' cry from the cross:
1st May '16 7:22:15 PM Jeduthun
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* ExpensiveGlassOfCrap: Referenced in the story of the wedding at Cana. It was apparently customary to bring out the lower-quality wine after the guests were tipsy, but when Jesus turned water into wine, he turned it into the ''good'' stuff.

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* ExpensiveGlassOfCrap: Referenced in the story of the wedding at Cana. It was apparently customary to bring out the lower-quality wine after the guests were tipsy, but when Jesus turned water into wine, he turned it into the ''good'' stuff.stuff and people could tell the difference.
1st May '16 7:19:45 PM Jeduthun
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* ExpensiveGlassOfCrap: Referenced in the story of the wedding at Cana. It was apparently customary to bring out the lower-quality wine after the guests were tipsy, but when Jesus turned water into wine, he turned it into the ''good'' stuff.
29th Apr '16 9:30:31 AM VicGeorge2011
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* JesusWasCrazy:

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* JesusWasCrazy:JesusWasCrazy



* NeverAcceptedInHisHometown: In Matthew, Jesus goes back to Nazareth, where he grew up. His frigid reception causes him to [[LampshadeHanging Lampshade]] this trope. But Jesus said to them, "Only in his hometown and in his own house is a prophet without honor." Things don't go so well, because, honestly, how seriously would you take your old neighbor if he suddenly showed up after years of living out of town, going on about how he's the son of God and the new age is at hand?

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* NeverAcceptedInHisHometown: NeverAcceptedInHisHometown
**
In Matthew, Jesus goes back to Nazareth, where he grew up. His frigid reception causes him to [[LampshadeHanging Lampshade]] this trope. But Jesus said to them, "Only in his hometown and in his own house is a prophet without honor." Things don't go so well, because, honestly, how seriously would you take your old neighbor if he suddenly showed up after years of living out of town, going on about how he's the son of God and the new age is at hand?
29th Apr '16 9:29:09 AM VicGeorge2011
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* JesusWasCrazy: In one of the gospels, Jesus' mother and His brothers tried to intervene on His behalf for they were hearing that "He is beside Himself." And frequently, His hearers say things like "He has a demon", an idiomatic way of saying "He's crazy" (since demonic possession was believed to cause insanity).

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* JesusWasCrazy: JesusWasCrazy:
**
In one of the gospels, Jesus' mother and His brothers tried to intervene on His behalf for they were hearing that "He is beside Himself." And frequently, His hearers say things like "He has a demon", an idiomatic way of saying "He's crazy" (since demonic possession was believed to cause insanity).
29th Apr '16 9:28:11 AM VicGeorge2011
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** In the gospel of Luke, Jesus says this after He stands up in the synagogue in Nazareth to read Isaiah 61:1,2 and then declares “Today this Scripture is fulfilled in your hearing.”

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** In the gospel of Luke, Jesus says this after He stands up in the synagogue in Nazareth to read Isaiah 61:1,2 (stopping short of adding "and the day of vengeance of our God; to comfort all that mourn") and then declares “Today this Scripture is fulfilled in your hearing.”
29th Apr '16 9:21:41 AM VicGeorge2011
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* JesusWasCrazy: In one of the gospels, Jesus' mother and His brothers tried to intervene on His behalf for they were hearing that "He is beside Himself."

to:

* JesusWasCrazy: In one of the gospels, Jesus' mother and His brothers tried to intervene on His behalf for they were hearing that "He is beside Himself."" And frequently, His hearers say things like "He has a demon", an idiomatic way of saying "He's crazy" (since demonic possession was believed to cause insanity).
** And as Jesus notes, they said similar things about His immediate predecessor:
--->''For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, ‘He has a demon’; the Son of man came eating and drinking, and they say, ‘Behold, a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!’'' [[note]][[https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Matthew%2011:18-19&version=RSV Matt 11:18-19]][[/note]]
19th Apr '16 6:04:09 AM VicGeorge2011
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* MeaningfulRename: Jesus gives Simon the new name "Peter", which means "rock", because his declaration that Jesus is the Messiah who will be the rock on which Jesus will build his church. (Which makes sense since God is constantly referred to by the Jews as "the Rock.") Or Peter himself as the rock, according to Catholic interpretations.

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* MeaningfulRename: Jesus gives Simon the new name "Peter", which means "rock", because of his declaration that Jesus is the Messiah who will be the rock on which Jesus will build his His church. (Which makes sense since God is constantly referred to by the Jews as "the Rock.") Or Peter himself as the rock, according to Catholic interpretations.
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