History Literature / TheBorrowers

24th Mar '15 6:28:04 AM Spindriver
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Arrietty Clock lives with her parents under the floor in the house of a "human bean". They live by "borrowing" from the human beans (it's only "stealing" if you take things from another Borrower), but never anything that might be missed; a Borrower must never be seen by a human bean, or let a human bean in any way know they exist. Unfortunately, Arrietty is a little too curious for her own good, and ends up talking with a human boy. The boy ends up fetching little things that might help the Borrowers, things they couldn't get for themselves.

to:

Arrietty Clock lives with her parents under the floor in the house of a "human bean". They live by "borrowing" from the human beans (it's only "stealing" if you take things from another Borrower), but never anything that might be missed; [[TheMasquerade a Borrower must never be seen by a human bean, or let a human bean in any way know they exist.exist]]. Unfortunately, Arrietty is a little too curious for her own good, and ends up talking with a human boy. The boy ends up fetching little things that might help the Borrowers, things they couldn't get for themselves.



En route, they encounter Spiller, a loner who says little but sees much. He's a great hunter, and although their initial interaction is cool (as in "not quite frigid"), soon enough they warm to him. (At times it even looks like he and Arrietty might eventually get together and the fourth novel Borrowers Aloft ends with the declaration that they will get married eventually and a fairly detailed description of their future home and life together, but this never happens within the series. The final book introduces the character of Peagreen as another romantic possibility for Arrietty but ends without any romantic resolution.) He helps them out of a couple tight spots, including when they're captured by humans, and eventually even shows them a miniature village they can live in (crafted by a human, but they stay decently hidden so he doesn't see them).

to:

En route, they encounter Spiller, a loner who says little but sees much. He's a great hunter, and although their initial interaction is cool (as in "not quite frigid"), soon enough they warm to him. (At times it even looks like he and Arrietty might eventually get together together, and the fourth novel Borrowers Aloft novel, ''Borrowers Aloft,'' ends with the declaration that they will get married eventually and a fairly detailed description of their future home and life together, together -- but this never happens within the series. The final book introduces the character of Peagreen as another romantic possibility for Arrietty but ends without any romantic resolution.) He helps them out of a couple tight spots, including when they're captured by humans, and eventually even shows them a miniature village they can live in (crafted by a human, but they stay decently hidden so he doesn't see them).



* BambooTechnology: Loads.
* DoNotGoGentle: often with StiffUpperLip.
* DyingRace: Arrietty is afraid that Borrowers may be this.
* TheEdwardianEra: Time period when the series is set.

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* BambooTechnology: Loads.
Borrowers use a lot of this.
* DoNotGoGentle: often Often with StiffUpperLip.
* DyingRace: Arrietty is afraid that Borrowers may be this.
dying out.
* TheEdwardianEra: Time The time period when the series is set.



* IllBoy: The human boy was in the house because he was recovering from [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rheumatic_fever rheumatic fever]], which even to this day is considered a dangerous and chronic disease.

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* IllBoy: The human boy was is in the house because he was is recovering from [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rheumatic_fever rheumatic fever]], which even to this day is considered a dangerous and chronic disease.



* {{Lilliputians}}

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* {{Lilliputians}}{{Lilliputians}}: The Borrowers' defining feature.



* MouseWorld

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* MouseWorldMouseWorld: The Borrowers exist on a mouse-sized scale.



* PosthumousCharacter: Within the FramingDevice story, ''all'' of the major characters might be considered this, since the main story takes place so long ago -- though only the Boy (who was the younger brother of Mrs. May, who first tells "Kate" the story of the Borrowers) is actually confirmed to have died; the Borrowers themselves simply left and were never seen again.

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* PosthumousCharacter: PosthumousCharacter:
**
Within the FramingDevice story, ''all'' of the major characters might be considered this, since the main story takes place so long ago -- though only the Boy (who was the younger brother of Mrs. May, who first tells "Kate" the story of the Borrowers) is actually confirmed to have died; the Borrowers themselves simply left and were never seen again.



* PunnyName: even names are borrowed. There's Stainless, Pod (the plant), Eggletina. Surnames are often where the family lives such as the Clocks or Overmantles.
* ScavengedPunk: As a franchise, ''The Borrowers'' provides what is perhaps the URExample of ScavengedPunk. The family, and borrowers in general, scavenge everything they need from humans and end up building a lot of cool equipment. Movie adaptations have provided some of the best ever visual examples of ScavengedPunk.

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* PunnyName: even Even names are borrowed. There's Borrowed; for example, there are Stainless, Pod (the plant), and Eggletina. Surnames are often taken from where the family lives lives, such as the Clocks or Overmantles.
* ScavengedPunk: As a franchise, ''The Borrowers'' provides what is perhaps the URExample UrExample of ScavengedPunk. The family, and borrowers in general, scavenge everything they need from humans and end up building a lot of cool equipment. Movie adaptations have provided some of the best ever visual examples of ScavengedPunk.
* WainscotSociety: Insofar as the thinly-spread Borrowers have a society, it is kept fairly scrupulously secret from ordinary humans.



!!Trope examples exclusive to the 1990s TV episodes:

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!!Trope examples !!Tropes exclusive to the 1990s TV episodes:
5th Jul '14 8:42:09 AM Roo
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* FramingDevice: The first and second books have framing stories of how the author, as a child, meets and talks to people who knew the Borrowers long ago.

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* FramingDevice: The first and first, second and third books have framing stories of how the author, as a child, meets and talks to people who knew the Borrowers long ago.ago, but this is dropped for the fourth and fifth book.



* LiteraryAgentHypothesis: The story of the Borrowers is presented as something told to the author when she was a child (she gives her younger self the name "Kate," to distance herself from the [[TakeThatMe "wild, untidy, self-willed little girl who stared with angry eyes and was said to crunch her teeth"]] she apparently was back then), and which she wrote down for her own children when she was an adult. This is most clear in the first two books, where the FramingDevice is the story of how "Kate" meets and talks to old people who either met or were told of the Borrowers in their youths. The latter books (and almost all the adaptations) drop this device, but still include people who could conceivably have talked to "Kate" many years later and told her the story.

to:

* LiteraryAgentHypothesis: The story of the Borrowers is presented as something told to the author when she was a child (she gives her younger self the name "Kate," to distance herself from the [[TakeThatMe "wild, untidy, self-willed little girl who stared with angry eyes and was said to crunch her teeth"]] she apparently was back then), and which she wrote down for her own children when she was an adult. This is most clear in the first two three books, where the FramingDevice is the story of how "Kate" meets and talks to old people who either met or were told of the Borrowers in their youths. The latter books (and almost all the adaptations) drop this device, but still include people who could conceivably have talked to "Kate" many years later and told her the story.
21st Mar '14 8:42:30 AM EgregiousEric
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Arrietty's parents, Pod and Homily, are frightened and upset, but eventually (if somewhat stiffly) accept that the human boy is going to help them and not harm them. However, soon enough the adults see the Borrowers too, so the family hides and has to pack up and leave the house. They head out into the wild -- like [[Main/TheLordOfTheRings Bilbo]], they're not the adventurous type -- and try to make it to a house their relatives moved to years ago.

to:

Arrietty's parents, Pod and Homily, are frightened and upset, but eventually (if somewhat stiffly) accept that the human boy is going to help them and not harm them. However, soon enough the adults see the Borrowers too, so the family hides and has to pack up and leave the house. They head out into the wild -- like [[Main/TheLordOfTheRings [[Literature/TheHobbit Bilbo]], they're not the adventurous type -- and try to make it to a house their relatives moved to years ago.
20th Feb '14 5:47:33 PM Merlanthe
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En route, they encounter Spiller, a loner who says little but sees much. He's a great hunter, and although their initial interaction is cool (as in "not quite frigid"), soon enough they warm to him. (At times it even looks like he and Arrietty might eventually get together, but this never happens within the series. She settles down with a guy called Peagreen who lives in a greenhouse.) He helps them out of a couple tight spots, including when they're captured by humans, and eventually even shows them a miniature village they can live in (crafted by a human, but they stay decently hidden so he doesn't see them).

to:

En route, they encounter Spiller, a loner who says little but sees much. He's a great hunter, and although their initial interaction is cool (as in "not quite frigid"), soon enough they warm to him. (At times it even looks like he and Arrietty might eventually get together and the fourth novel Borrowers Aloft ends with the declaration that they will get married eventually and a fairly detailed description of their future home and life together, but this never happens within the series. She settles down with a guy called The final book introduces the character of Peagreen who lives in a greenhouse.as another romantic possibility for Arrietty but ends without any romantic resolution.) He helps them out of a couple tight spots, including when they're captured by humans, and eventually even shows them a miniature village they can live in (crafted by a human, but they stay decently hidden so he doesn't see them).
28th Jun '13 9:07:51 AM Vidus
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Added DiffLines:

* PunnyName: even names are borrowed. There's Stainless, Pod (the plant), Eggletina. Surnames are often where the family lives such as the Clocks or Overmantles.
20th Jun '13 9:23:20 AM Vidus
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Added DiffLines:

* DoNotGoGentle: often with StiffUpperLip.
25th Feb '13 6:12:33 AM GhostOfAGeek
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[[AC:These books provide examples of:]]

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[[AC:These !!These books provide examples of:]]
of:



[[AC:Trope examples exclusive to the 1990s TV episodes:]]

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[[AC:Trope !!Trope examples exclusive to the 1990s TV episodes:]]
episodes:
25th Feb '13 1:00:31 AM PaulA
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An enjoyable series that made for a pretty good couple of movies, starting with a 1973 made-for-TV Hallmark hall of fame movie. [[Film/TheBorrowers1997 The 1997 film starring John Goodman]] takes a far more urban setup, overturns the idea that the Borrowers have a low population, and in general is not as faithful to the books as the original movies were.

A [[TheBBC BBC]] TV movie adaptation was released for Christmas 2011, featuring StephenFry and Creator/ChristopherEccleston. It's even more of an InNameOnly adaptation, taking place in a modern-day city, featuring a mostly original plot and drastically altered characters -- the most notable ones being Spiller, who's been changed from NobleSavage to a TroubledButCute biker boy in a red leather jacket, and the human Mildeye, who's gone from an [[{{Roma}} evil, brutal Rom]] to an evil-but-bumbling professor played by StephenFry. Like the 1997 movie, it completely goes away from the "borrowers as a dying race" idea; here there turns out to be enough of them in one place to populate an entire underground city (built on the platform and partly on the tracks of an abandoned railway station). The critics noted, though, that while the movie had very little to do with Mary Norton's books, it still stayed fairly true to the themes and spirit of them, making it more of a PragmaticAdaptation. ''Extremely'' pragmatic.

The Beeb had previously run a couple of miniseries in the nineties that were more faithful adaptations of the books.

The first book has also been adapted into an animated movie by StudioGhibli, titled ''Anime/TheBorrowerArrietty'' (released in the U.S. as ''The Secret World of Arrietty'' and in the U.K. as just ''Arrietty'').

to:

An enjoyable series that made for a pretty good couple of movies, starting with a 1973 made-for-TV Hallmark hall of fame movie. [[Film/TheBorrowers1997 The 1997 film starring John Goodman]] takes a far more urban setup, overturns the idea that the Borrowers have a low population, and in general is not as faithful to the books as the original movies were.

were. A [[TheBBC BBC]] [[Film/TheBorrowers2011 BBC TV movie adaptation adaptation]] was released for Christmas 2011, featuring StephenFry Creator/StephenFry and Creator/ChristopherEccleston. It's even more of an InNameOnly adaptation, taking place in a modern-day city, featuring a mostly original plot and drastically altered characters -- the most notable ones being Spiller, who's been changed from NobleSavage to a TroubledButCute biker boy in a red leather jacket, and the human Mildeye, who's gone from an [[{{Roma}} evil, brutal Rom]] to an evil-but-bumbling professor played by StephenFry. Like the 1997 movie, it completely goes away from the "borrowers as a dying race" idea; here there turns out to be enough of them in one place to populate an entire underground city (built on the platform and partly on the tracks of an abandoned railway station). The critics noted, though, that while the movie had very little to do with Mary Norton's books, it still stayed fairly true to the themes and spirit of them, making it more of a PragmaticAdaptation. ''Extremely'' pragmatic.

The Beeb had previously run a couple of miniseries in the nineties that were more faithful adaptations of the books.

books. The first book has also been adapted into an animated movie by StudioGhibli, titled ''Anime/TheBorrowerArrietty'' (released in the U.S. as ''The Secret World of Arrietty'' and in the U.K. as just ''Arrietty'').



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[[AC:Trope examples exclusive to the 2011 BBC film:]]

* AdaptationalAttractiveness: Neither Homily nor Pod were described as very good-looking in the books. In this movie they're played by [[HotMom Sharon Horgan]] and Creator/ChristopherEccleston.
* AllGirlsWantBadBoys: Spiller tries to invoke this with Arrietty. Not played completely straight, though; she's enticed by him but quickly begins finding him annoying.
* TheAtoner: Pod, or at least he feels so. [[spoiler: The Borrowers view him as a hero, since he several years ago saved them from being discovered by humans and killed -- but Pod never got over the one little girl he ''couldn't'' save, his niece Eggletina. Her death is the reason why he's now being overprotective towards Arrietty.]]
* BigDamnHeroes:
-->'''Homily:''' I don't know how much more I can take of this.\\
'''Pod:''' It's gonna be all right.\\
'''Homily:''' ''How?'' How is it gonna be all right, how can you say that?!\\
'''Pod:''' Because Arrietty's just about to save us.
* [[spoiler:DeathByAdaptation: Eggletina, who is set up as a PosthumousCharacter in the books, but is later revealed to be alive. In the film, there seems to be little doubt that she died.]]
* GildedCage: Arrietty lives in luxury, with her father bringing her anything she could want, but is kept completely cut off from the outside world.
* IneffectualSympatheticVillain: Borderline case with Mildeye; he ''is'' a genuine threat to the Borrowers largely because he's so much bigger than them, but he bumbles so much that you almost have to feel sorry for him when he loses out and makes a fool of himself. It helps that he's played by StephenFry, no doubt.
** Subverted with his assistant Jenny, who at first seems like a shy and awkward, but harmless girl -- only to reveal a rather disturbing sadistic streak later on.
* JerkWithAHeartOfGold: Spiller. With a side-order of HandsomeLech.
* HollywoodToneDeaf: Spiller, when trying to sing ''Hark! The Herald Angels Sing.''
* LargeHam: Stephen Fry is about as hammy in this movie as John Goodman was in the 1997 one.
* MissingMom: James's mother is recently dead.
* NamedByTheAdaptation: James, the human boy who befriends the Clock family.
* RaceLift: Professor Mildeye. In the books, Mildeye was a villainous [[{{Roma}} Rom]]. In the movie he's a pompous scientist played by StephenFry. Basically the two characters have nothing in common apart from the name and the role as antagonist.
* ScreeningTheCall: Arrietty is stated to have inherited a natural gift and thirst for adventure from her father. Pod, however, refuses to let her go out Borrowing, and unlike his book counterpart won't let himself be talked into it. He turns out to have his reasons.
* SoftspokenSadist: While she at first just seems to be a socially-awkward [[TheStoic Stoic,]] Jenny reveals herself to be one. While Mildeye is simply interested in catching the Borrowers ForScience (and for personal glory), Jenny wants to kill and cut them up for the hell of it.
-->'''Jenny:''' ''(pulling out a scalpel)'' Does this mean I get to dissect the little skebangas?\\
'''Mildeye:''' ''(looking at the scalpel)'' I have to say I find it a little disconcerting that you had that quite so readily to hand.
* StepfordSmiler: Homily in the early parts of the movie; she's keeping up a happy facade for Arrietty's benefit but only really manages to come off as delusional.
25th Feb '13 12:51:46 AM PaulA
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An enjoyable series that made for a pretty good couple of movies, starting with a 1973 made-for-TV Hallmark hall of fame movie. The 1997 film starring John Goodman takes a far more urban setup, overturns the idea that the Borrowers have a low population (the ending is rather like that of ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory''), and in general is not as faithful to the books as the original movies were. It at least avoided being InNameOnly by keeping the members of the Clock family more-or-less true to their book characterizations, although even there they recast Peagreen (a minor character in the books) as Arrietty's AnnoyingYoungerSibling. It also pretty much dropped the original plot in favor of one centering around the scheme of Goodman's AmoralAttorney villain to demolish the house where the Borrowers live. It also features a young TomFelton.

to:

An enjoyable series that made for a pretty good couple of movies, starting with a 1973 made-for-TV Hallmark hall of fame movie. [[Film/TheBorrowers1997 The 1997 film starring John Goodman Goodman]] takes a far more urban setup, overturns the idea that the Borrowers have a low population (the ending is rather like that of ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory''), population, and in general is not as faithful to the books as the original movies were. It at least avoided being InNameOnly by keeping the members of the Clock family more-or-less true to their book characterizations, although even there they recast Peagreen (a minor character in the books) as Arrietty's AnnoyingYoungerSibling. It also pretty much dropped the original plot in favor of one centering around the scheme of Goodman's AmoralAttorney villain to demolish the house where the Borrowers live. It also features a young TomFelton.
were.



[[AC:Trope examples exclusive to the 1997 film:]]

* AmoralAttorney: The villain of the movie, [[{{Roseanne}} John Goodman's]] character Mr. Potter.
* AnnoyingYoungerSibling: Arrietty is given one, Peagreen, played by Tom Felton.
* ColorWash: Everything is orange, for no readily apparent reason.
* CulturalTranslation: Fairly minimal. The human boy and the villain are both Americans, but everyone else is British.
* DeadpanSnarker: Peagreen, as part of his BrattyHalfPint shtick, gets in a few really biting comments.
* GilliganCut: Pod: "No! No! No! It's not going to happen." Cut to Pete carrying the Clock family out to a moving truck.
* HumiliationConga: Mr. Potter for the entirety of the movie.
* ITakeOffenseToThatLastOne:
-->'''Arrietty''': Peagreen, try to understand, there won't be a "here" unless we get this will to Pete before that nasty, cheating, thieving, evil, greedy, vicious, ugly bean destroys our house.\\
'''Potter''': Ugly? Who they calling ugly?
* LargeHam: John Goodman. Why are we not suprised?
* MacGuffin: A Will which entitles the Lenders to the house and thus stands in the way of Potter's scheme to replace it with condos.
* MeaningfulName: The last name of the human family who owns the house where the Clock family lives? The Lenders.
* TheMillstone: Peagreen's two main functions in the movie is to be sarcastic and to [[DistressedDude get into trouble so the others will need to rescue him.]]
* NamedByTheAdaptation: Pete [[MeaningfulName Lender]], the human boy who befriends the Clock family.
* PunchClockVillain: Exterminator Jeff is a rather nice, friendly man who's fascinated by the Borrowers and is only helping Potter because he's been hired as a pest exterminator.
* RetroUniverse: Seems to be set in one, complete with ZeppelinsFromAnotherWorld visible in the sky.
* ShoutOut: The exterminator's appearance is not only a tribute to Film/{{Ghostbusters}}, but also to {{Arachnophobia}}, which featured John Goodman as an exterminator.
* VillainousBreakdown: Mr. Potter's starts early, but it never ends. By the end of the film, he seems to care about nothing except killing those Borrowers at any cost.
* WhereTheHellIsSpringfield: The film's setting contains elements of the US and the UK with the use of both American and British actors adding to the ambiguity of it all.
* YouCantMissIt: John Goodman's character rudely asked a receptionist for directions to a room in the building and she replied by giving him a lot of complicated instructions, ending with "walk quickly". Later on, the Kid Hero politely asked for the same thing and this time she said "take the elevator to the top and walk straight ahead - "You can't miss it".

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25th Feb '13 12:40:26 AM PaulA
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The first book has also been adapted into an animated movie by StudioGhibli, titled ''TheBorrowerArrietty'' (released in the U.S. as ''The Secret World of Arrietty'' and in the U.K. as just ''Arrietty'').

to:

The first book has also been adapted into an animated movie by StudioGhibli, titled ''TheBorrowerArrietty'' ''Anime/TheBorrowerArrietty'' (released in the U.S. as ''The Secret World of Arrietty'' and in the U.K. as just ''Arrietty'').



[[AC:Trope examples exclusive to ''The Borrower Arrietty'']]

* AnimatedAdaptation: ''The Borrower Arrietty''.
* CulturalTranslation: The anime version takes place in 2010 in Western Tokyo's neighborhood of Koganei which is also where Studio Ghibli happens to be located.
* NamedByTheAdaptation: Sho, the human boy who befriends Arrietty.

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