History Literature / TheAeneid

13th Jun '17 10:12:55 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* ForgingScene: Venus gets Vulcan to forge armor for Aeneas.

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* ForgingScene: Venus gets Vulcan [[UltimateBlacksmith Vulcan]] to forge armor for Aeneas.
5th Jun '17 6:47:31 AM LordGro
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* JerkassGods: Pretty much all of them, but Juno is in her own category.

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* %%* JerkassGods: Pretty much all of them, but Juno is in her own category.



* LoveRuinsTheRealm: Could have been the title of Dido's autobiography.

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* %%* LoveRuinsTheRealm: Could have been the title of Dido's autobiography.



* WatchingTroyBurn: The TropeNamer.

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* %%* WatchingTroyBurn: The TropeNamer.
5th Jun '17 6:41:15 AM SorPepita
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%%* JerkassGods: Pretty much all of them, but Juno is in her own category.

to:

%%* * JerkassGods: Pretty much all of them, but Juno is in her own category.



%%* LoveRuinsTheRealm: Could have been the title of Dido's autobiography.

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%%* * LoveRuinsTheRealm: Could have been the title of Dido's autobiography.



** Mezentius]is one of the first. His whole shtick is essentially, "screw you Jupiter!"

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** Mezentius]is Mezentius is one of the first.first known examples. His whole shtick is essentially, "screw you Jupiter!"



%%* WatchingTroyBurn: The TropeNamer.

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%%* * WatchingTroyBurn: The TropeNamer.
27th May '17 2:55:59 PM Springheeled_Jack
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Added DiffLines:

** The text references a type of ship called a bireme multiple times, which did not exist at the time of the story.
19th Apr '17 6:58:09 PM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

--> '''Jupiter''': His ego nec metas rerum nec tempora pono;\\
Imperium sine fine dedi.\\
["For these I set no limits, world or time,\\
But make the gift of empire without end"].\\
Lines 278279 (tr. Robert Fitzgerald)
14th Apr '17 2:36:46 PM Specialist290
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The city he eventually founds is the one from which Roman founders Romulus and Remus supposedly come. ''The Aeneid'' was intended as a propaganda piece for the [[JusttheFirstCitizen emperor-in-all-but-name]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]], who had recently become the supreme power in Rome, then ravaged by civil war, by defeating Mark Anthony and UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII. Aeneas, who is pious[[note]]Aeneas is often called ''pius Aeneas''. ''Pius'' is often translated as pious, but it refers to devotion to not only the gods, but also one's family and country. In the case of Aeneas, his country is the Rome which will eventually exist.[[/note]], dutiful and brave, was held as the Roman ideal and is obliquely compared with Augustus at several points in the poem. Standard material for Latin students; the U.S. AP Latin exam assumes its takers have read at least a requisite 1800 lines, as the entire test is about the epic. (At least, it did, but as of the 2013 exam, the number of lines of the Aeneid has been lessened, and the AP Latin exam now also tests on [[UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar Caesar's]] ''De Bello Gallico''. Students still need to know the story in its entirety, though. They're just not held responsible for as much of the Latin.)

to:

The city he eventually founds is the one from which Roman founders Romulus and Remus supposedly come. ''The Aeneid'' was intended as a propaganda piece for the [[JusttheFirstCitizen emperor-in-all-but-name]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]], who had recently become the supreme power in Rome, then ravaged by civil war, by defeating Mark Anthony and UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII. Aeneas, who is pious[[note]]Aeneas is often called ''pius Aeneas''. ''Pius'' is often translated as pious, but it refers to devotion to not only the gods, but also one's family and country. In the case of Aeneas, his country is the Rome which will eventually exist.[[/note]], dutiful and brave, was held as the Roman ideal and is obliquely compared with Augustus at several points in the poem. Standard material for Latin students; the U.S. AP Latin exam assumes its takers have read at least a requisite 1800 lines, as the entire test is about the epic. (At least, it did, but as of the 2013 exam, the number of lines of the Aeneid has been lessened, and the AP Latin exam now also tests on [[UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar Caesar's]] ''De ''[[Literature/CommentariesOnTheGallicWar De Bello Gallico''.Gallico]]''. Students still need to know the story in its entirety, though. They're just not held responsible for as much of the Latin.)
12th Mar '17 2:29:20 PM Xtifr
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The city he eventually founds is the one from which Roman founders Romulus and Remus supposedly come. ''The Aeneid'' was intended as a propaganda piece for the [[JusttheFirstCitizen emperor-in-all-but-name]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]], who had recently become the supreme power in Rome, then ravaged by civil war, by defeating Mark Anthony and UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII. Aeneas, who is pious[[note]]Aeneas is often called ''pius Aeneas''. ''Pius'' is often translated as pious, but it refers to devotion to not only the gods, but also one's family and country. In the case of Aeneas, his country is the Rome which will eventually exist.[[/note]], dutiful and brave, was held as the Roman ideal and is obliquely compared with Augustus at several points in the poem. Standard material for Latin students; the U.S. AP Latin exam assumes its takers have read at least a requisite 1800 lines, as the entire test is about the epic. (At least, it did, but as of the 2013 exam, the number of lines of the Aeneid has been lessened, and the AP Latin exam now also tests on [[Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar Caesar's]] ''De Bello Gallico''. Students still need to know the story in its entirety, though. They're just not held responsible for as much of the Latin.)

to:

The city he eventually founds is the one from which Roman founders Romulus and Remus supposedly come. ''The Aeneid'' was intended as a propaganda piece for the [[JusttheFirstCitizen emperor-in-all-but-name]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]], who had recently become the supreme power in Rome, then ravaged by civil war, by defeating Mark Anthony and UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII. Aeneas, who is pious[[note]]Aeneas is often called ''pius Aeneas''. ''Pius'' is often translated as pious, but it refers to devotion to not only the gods, but also one's family and country. In the case of Aeneas, his country is the Rome which will eventually exist.[[/note]], dutiful and brave, was held as the Roman ideal and is obliquely compared with Augustus at several points in the poem. Standard material for Latin students; the U.S. AP Latin exam assumes its takers have read at least a requisite 1800 lines, as the entire test is about the epic. (At least, it did, but as of the 2013 exam, the number of lines of the Aeneid has been lessened, and the AP Latin exam now also tests on [[Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar [[UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar Caesar's]] ''De Bello Gallico''. Students still need to know the story in its entirety, though. They're just not held responsible for as much of the Latin.)
12th Feb '17 3:13:12 PM ProfessorP
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Hector said 'You're movin' your gods and peeps to Hesper!"\\]]

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Hector said 'You're movin' your gods and peeps to Hesper!"\\]]Hesper!"]]
12th Feb '17 3:12:44 PM ProfessorP
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{{Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir Muse, tell me a story all about how\\

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{{Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir [[Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir Muse, tell me a story all about how\\



Hector said 'You're movin' your gods and peeps to Hesper!"\\}}

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Hector said 'You're movin' your gods and peeps to Hesper!"\\}}Hesper!"\\]]
12th Feb '17 3:12:10 PM ProfessorP
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Muse, tell me a story all about how\\

to:

{{Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir Muse, tell me a story all about how\\



Hector said 'You're movin' your gods and peeps to Hesper!"\\

to:

Hector said 'You're movin' your gods and peeps to Hesper!"\\Hesper!"\\}}
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