History Literature / TheAeneid

17th Dec '16 12:34:20 PM skadooshbag
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The poem may well have made some tropes, and used others cheerfully. This guarantees that all those tropes are at least OlderThanFeudalism, if[[UnbuiltTrope built]] at all.

to:

The poem may well have made some tropes, and used others cheerfully. This guarantees that all those tropes are at least OlderThanFeudalism, if[[UnbuiltTrope if [[UnbuiltTrope built]] at all.
17th Dec '16 12:33:17 PM skadooshbag
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The poem may well have made some tropes, and used others cheerfully. This guarantees that all those tropes are at least OlderThanFeudalism, if[[UnbultTrope built]] at all.

to:

The poem may well have made some tropes, and used others cheerfully. This guarantees that all those tropes are at least OlderThanFeudalism, if[[UnbultTrope if[[UnbuiltTrope built]] at all.
17th Dec '16 12:28:23 PM skadooshbag
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The poem may well have made some tropes, and used others cheerfully. This guarantees that all those tropes are at least OlderThanFeudalism.

to:

The poem may well have made some tropes, and used others cheerfully. This guarantees that all those tropes are at least OlderThanFeudalism.OlderThanFeudalism, if[[UnbultTrope built]] at all.
24th Nov '16 2:16:21 PM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

* PropagandaHero: The poem was more or less state propaganda promoted by UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} to link the emerging and brand-new UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire with antique origins. It deliberately aimed to displace Remus and Romulus (the popular founders of Rome) with Aeneas. The Julio-Claudian family of which Augustus was a descendant claimed descent from the Trojans and the Goddess Venus, both origins linked Augustus and Caesar to Aeneas, thereby creating a continuity of the ruling family with their ancestors, and insisting that the foundations of Rome were imperial rather than republican. Aeneas likewise embodies virtues more amenable to Augustan Roman: piety, family honor, stoicism, differing from the more capricious and earthy nature of the Homeric attitude.
4th Nov '16 7:31:44 AM dlchen145
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%%* {{Badass}}: It's a continuation of ''Literature/TheIliad'', so half the cast counts. Turnus, Camilla, Aeneas in the later chapters, and without a doubt, Mezentius, the Etruscan tyrant who comes to Turnus's aid. He's so badass he can ignore the gods, and still give Aeneas one of the best fights in the book.
%%** Even in the early books, Aeneas shows hints of his badass nature. When he goes hunting for dinner, he manages to take down ''seven deer'' with a bow and arrow.
%%** Diomedes, his name is constantly hinted throughout the book, and when it was revealed that he was in Italy, Aphrodite was worried he might try to kill Aeneas (a legitimate concern, since it took two gods to stop him). Luckily for Aeneas, he appears to be neutral.



** [[BadAss Mezentius]] is one of the first. His whole shtick is essentially, "screw you Jupiter!"

to:

** [[BadAss Mezentius]] is Mezentius]is one of the first. His whole shtick is essentially, "screw you Jupiter!"



* WouldntHitAGirl: Some historians believe that the reason [[spoiler:Camilla isn't killed by Aeneas was so that Virgil could avoid having his hero kill a woman. Even a BadAss ActionGirl kind of woman]].

to:

* WouldntHitAGirl: Some historians believe that the reason [[spoiler:Camilla isn't killed by Aeneas was so that Virgil could avoid having his hero kill a woman. Even a BadAss badass ActionGirl kind of woman]].
2nd Nov '16 2:40:35 PM cpslck
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Added DiffLines:

** Most of the Greeks in general are portrayed unsympathetically. Odysseus for example is a slimy ManipulativeBastard compared to the GuileHero OnlySaneMan in Homer's epics.
** This also applies to the Gods that were on the Greeks side. Hera's grudge against Aeneas is incredibly petty and excessively destructive. Athena doesn't make an appearance but sends snakes to kill off Laocoon simply for figuring out the trap and warning the Trojans.
* AdultFear: Pyrrhus brutally killing Polites in front of Priam is probably the worst thing you can do to a father.
12th Oct '16 6:51:58 AM 06tele
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* DesignatedHero: One of the reasons why the book sells less well than the ''Literature/TheIliad'' or ''Literature/TheOdyssey'' is that modern readers often consider Aeneas to be this.
12th Oct '16 6:51:08 AM 06tele
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Added DiffLines:

* DesignatedHero: One of the reasons why the book sells less well than the ''Literature/TheIliad'' or ''Literature/TheOdyssey'' is that modern readers often consider Aeneas to be this.
5th Jun '16 8:20:32 AM Eievie
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->''"Arma virumque cano..."''
->''(I sing of arms and the man...)''

to:

->''"Arma virumque cano..."''
->''(I
cano…"\\
(I
sing of arms and the man...)''man…)''



''The Aeneid'' is an [[NarrativePoem epic poem]] written by the poet Publius Vergilius Maro - more commonly known as Creator/{{Virgil}}. It's considered one of the great forerunners of literature and many later works are deliberately based off the style Virgil used. Of course, Virgil himself was deliberately writing in the style of Creator/{{Homer}}, his literary hero, also basing his portrayal of certain characters off of stars of ''Literature/TheIliad'' or ''Literature/TheOdyssey''.

to:

''The Aeneid'' is an [[NarrativePoem epic poem]] written by the poet Publius Vergilius Maro - more Maro--more commonly known as Creator/{{Virgil}}. It's considered one of the great forerunners of literature and many later works are deliberately based off the style Virgil used. Of course, Virgil himself was deliberately writing in the style of Creator/{{Homer}}, his literary hero, also basing his portrayal of certain characters off of stars of ''Literature/TheIliad'' or ''Literature/TheOdyssey''.



* AerithAndBob: Amongst the exotic sounding Greek and Latin names, it may come as a surprise for some to also find names still used today like 'Anna' and 'Camilla'.

to:

* AerithAndBob: Amongst the exotic sounding Greek and Latin names, it may come as a surprise for some to also find names still used today like 'Anna' Anna and 'Camilla'.Camilla.



** Aeneas left Troy after an omen of impending doom - the death of Laocoön and his sons - and returned to Mt. Ida.

to:

** Aeneas left Troy after an omen of impending doom - the doom--the death of Laocoön and his sons - and sons--and returned to Mt. Ida.



-->'''Priam:''' How dare you make me witness my own son's death! You're no son of [[Literature/TheIliad Achilles]] -- he had respect for those begging for mercy!
-->'''Neoptolemus[[note]]a.k.a. Pyrrhus[[/note]]:''' You'll get to see my father yourself! Be sure to tell him how wicked his son is. Now die.

to:

-->'''Priam:''' How dare you make me witness my own son's death! You're no son of [[Literature/TheIliad Achilles]] -- he Achilles]]--he had respect for those begging for mercy!
-->'''Neoptolemus[[note]]a.
mercy!\\
'''Neoptolemus[[note]]a.
k.a. Pyrrhus[[/note]]:''' You'll get to see my father yourself! Be sure to tell him how wicked his son is. Now die.



* InMediasRes / HowWeGotHere: Books II and III are an extended flashback to the events of UsefulNotes/TheTrojanWar and the long period of wandering that followed it, leading up to the Trojans arrival in Carthage at the beginning of Book I.

to:

* InMediasRes / HowWeGotHere: InMediasRes[=/=]HowWeGotHere: Books II and III are an extended flashback to the events of UsefulNotes/TheTrojanWar and the long period of wandering that followed it, leading up to the Trojans arrival in Carthage at the beginning of Book I.



* LastOfHisKind: Aeneas and the other Trojans are part of a handful of survivors of their city-state after it was exterminated by the Greeks. ''The Aeneid'' definitely contributed to the idea of the surviving Trojans being the founders of other countries -- for example, several Medieval works had them as the founders of Britain.

to:

* LastOfHisKind: Aeneas and the other Trojans are part of a handful of survivors of their city-state after it was exterminated by the Greeks. ''The Aeneid'' definitely contributed to the idea of the surviving Trojans being the founders of other countries -- for countries--for example, several Medieval medieval works had them as the founders of Britain.



* ProphecyTwist: The Harpy Celaeno's prophecy that they will get so hungry that they'll eat their tables...which they do when they eat a meal served on big pieces of flatbread.

to:

* ProphecyTwist: The Harpy Celaeno's prophecy that they will get so hungry that they'll eat their tables... which they do when they eat a meal served on big pieces of flatbread.



* SwordOverHead: Subverted -- Aeneas almost decides to spare Turnus when he has him cornered at swordpoint, until he remembers how Turnus killed his friend.

to:

* SwordOverHead: Subverted -- Subverted. Aeneas almost decides to spare Turnus when he has him cornered at swordpoint, until he remembers how Turnus killed his friend.



* WeWillMeetAgain: Dido's LastWords are that hers and Aeneas' people will meet again in war -- Virgil's fictional cause of the Punic Wars.

to:

* WeWillMeetAgain: Dido's LastWords are that hers and Aeneas' people will meet again in war -- Virgil's war--Virgil's fictional cause of the Punic Wars.



--> '''Priam''': You pretend that Achilles was your father, but this is not how Achilles treated his enemy Priam.

to:

--> '''Priam''': -->'''Priam''': You pretend that Achilles was your father, but this is not how Achilles treated his enemy Priam.
10th May '16 9:00:35 AM Red-Dead-Redeemer
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* {{Badass}}: It's a continuation of ''Literature/TheIliad'', so half the cast counts. Turnus, Camilla, Aeneas in the later chapters, and without a doubt, Mezentius, the Etruscan tyrant who comes to Turnus's aid. He's so badass he can ignore the gods, and still give Aeneas one of the best fights in the book.
** Even in the early books, Aeneas shows hints of his badass nature. When he goes hunting for dinner, he manages to take down ''seven deer'' with a bow and arrow.
** Diomedes, his name is constantly hinted throughout the book, and when it was revealed that he was in Italy, Aphrodite was worried he might try to kill Aeneas (a legitimate concern, since it took two gods to stop him). Luckily for Aeneas, he appears to be neutral.

to:

* %%* {{Badass}}: It's a continuation of ''Literature/TheIliad'', so half the cast counts. Turnus, Camilla, Aeneas in the later chapters, and without a doubt, Mezentius, the Etruscan tyrant who comes to Turnus's aid. He's so badass he can ignore the gods, and still give Aeneas one of the best fights in the book.
** %%** Even in the early books, Aeneas shows hints of his badass nature. When he goes hunting for dinner, he manages to take down ''seven deer'' with a bow and arrow.
** %%** Diomedes, his name is constantly hinted throughout the book, and when it was revealed that he was in Italy, Aphrodite was worried he might try to kill Aeneas (a legitimate concern, since it took two gods to stop him). Luckily for Aeneas, he appears to be neutral.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheAeneid