History Literature / TheAeneid

12th Mar '17 2:29:20 PM Xtifr
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The city he eventually founds is the one from which Roman founders Romulus and Remus supposedly come. ''The Aeneid'' was intended as a propaganda piece for the [[JusttheFirstCitizen emperor-in-all-but-name]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]], who had recently become the supreme power in Rome, then ravaged by civil war, by defeating Mark Anthony and UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII. Aeneas, who is pious[[note]]Aeneas is often called ''pius Aeneas''. ''Pius'' is often translated as pious, but it refers to devotion to not only the gods, but also one's family and country. In the case of Aeneas, his country is the Rome which will eventually exist.[[/note]], dutiful and brave, was held as the Roman ideal and is obliquely compared with Augustus at several points in the poem. Standard material for Latin students; the U.S. AP Latin exam assumes its takers have read at least a requisite 1800 lines, as the entire test is about the epic. (At least, it did, but as of the 2013 exam, the number of lines of the Aeneid has been lessened, and the AP Latin exam now also tests on [[Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar Caesar's]] ''De Bello Gallico''. Students still need to know the story in its entirety, though. They're just not held responsible for as much of the Latin.)

to:

The city he eventually founds is the one from which Roman founders Romulus and Remus supposedly come. ''The Aeneid'' was intended as a propaganda piece for the [[JusttheFirstCitizen emperor-in-all-but-name]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]], who had recently become the supreme power in Rome, then ravaged by civil war, by defeating Mark Anthony and UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII. Aeneas, who is pious[[note]]Aeneas is often called ''pius Aeneas''. ''Pius'' is often translated as pious, but it refers to devotion to not only the gods, but also one's family and country. In the case of Aeneas, his country is the Rome which will eventually exist.[[/note]], dutiful and brave, was held as the Roman ideal and is obliquely compared with Augustus at several points in the poem. Standard material for Latin students; the U.S. AP Latin exam assumes its takers have read at least a requisite 1800 lines, as the entire test is about the epic. (At least, it did, but as of the 2013 exam, the number of lines of the Aeneid has been lessened, and the AP Latin exam now also tests on [[Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar [[UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar Caesar's]] ''De Bello Gallico''. Students still need to know the story in its entirety, though. They're just not held responsible for as much of the Latin.)
12th Feb '17 3:13:12 PM ProfessorP
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Hector said 'You're movin' your gods and peeps to Hesper!"\\]]

to:

Hector said 'You're movin' your gods and peeps to Hesper!"\\]]Hesper!"]]
12th Feb '17 3:12:44 PM ProfessorP
Is there an issue? Send a Message


{{Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir Muse, tell me a story all about how\\

to:

{{Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir [[Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir Muse, tell me a story all about how\\



Hector said 'You're movin' your gods and peeps to Hesper!"\\}}

to:

Hector said 'You're movin' your gods and peeps to Hesper!"\\}}Hesper!"\\]]
12th Feb '17 3:12:10 PM ProfessorP
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Muse, tell me a story all about how\\

to:

{{Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir Muse, tell me a story all about how\\



Hector said 'You're movin' your gods and peeps to Hesper!"\\

to:

Hector said 'You're movin' your gods and peeps to Hesper!"\\Hesper!"\\}}
17th Dec '16 12:34:20 PM skadooshbag
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The poem may well have made some tropes, and used others cheerfully. This guarantees that all those tropes are at least OlderThanFeudalism, if[[UnbuiltTrope built]] at all.

to:

The poem may well have made some tropes, and used others cheerfully. This guarantees that all those tropes are at least OlderThanFeudalism, if[[UnbuiltTrope if [[UnbuiltTrope built]] at all.
17th Dec '16 12:33:17 PM skadooshbag
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The poem may well have made some tropes, and used others cheerfully. This guarantees that all those tropes are at least OlderThanFeudalism, if[[UnbultTrope built]] at all.

to:

The poem may well have made some tropes, and used others cheerfully. This guarantees that all those tropes are at least OlderThanFeudalism, if[[UnbultTrope if[[UnbuiltTrope built]] at all.
17th Dec '16 12:28:23 PM skadooshbag
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The poem may well have made some tropes, and used others cheerfully. This guarantees that all those tropes are at least OlderThanFeudalism.

to:

The poem may well have made some tropes, and used others cheerfully. This guarantees that all those tropes are at least OlderThanFeudalism.OlderThanFeudalism, if[[UnbultTrope built]] at all.
24th Nov '16 2:16:21 PM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* PropagandaHero: The poem was more or less state propaganda promoted by UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} to link the emerging and brand-new UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire with antique origins. It deliberately aimed to displace Remus and Romulus (the popular founders of Rome) with Aeneas. The Julio-Claudian family of which Augustus was a descendant claimed descent from the Trojans and the Goddess Venus, both origins linked Augustus and Caesar to Aeneas, thereby creating a continuity of the ruling family with their ancestors, and insisting that the foundations of Rome were imperial rather than republican. Aeneas likewise embodies virtues more amenable to Augustan Roman: piety, family honor, stoicism, differing from the more capricious and earthy nature of the Homeric attitude.
4th Nov '16 7:31:44 AM dlchen145
Is there an issue? Send a Message


%%* {{Badass}}: It's a continuation of ''Literature/TheIliad'', so half the cast counts. Turnus, Camilla, Aeneas in the later chapters, and without a doubt, Mezentius, the Etruscan tyrant who comes to Turnus's aid. He's so badass he can ignore the gods, and still give Aeneas one of the best fights in the book.
%%** Even in the early books, Aeneas shows hints of his badass nature. When he goes hunting for dinner, he manages to take down ''seven deer'' with a bow and arrow.
%%** Diomedes, his name is constantly hinted throughout the book, and when it was revealed that he was in Italy, Aphrodite was worried he might try to kill Aeneas (a legitimate concern, since it took two gods to stop him). Luckily for Aeneas, he appears to be neutral.



** [[BadAss Mezentius]] is one of the first. His whole shtick is essentially, "screw you Jupiter!"

to:

** [[BadAss Mezentius]] is Mezentius]is one of the first. His whole shtick is essentially, "screw you Jupiter!"



* WouldntHitAGirl: Some historians believe that the reason [[spoiler:Camilla isn't killed by Aeneas was so that Virgil could avoid having his hero kill a woman. Even a BadAss ActionGirl kind of woman]].

to:

* WouldntHitAGirl: Some historians believe that the reason [[spoiler:Camilla isn't killed by Aeneas was so that Virgil could avoid having his hero kill a woman. Even a BadAss badass ActionGirl kind of woman]].
2nd Nov '16 2:40:35 PM cpslck
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Most of the Greeks in general are portrayed unsympathetically. Odysseus for example is a slimy ManipulativeBastard compared to the GuileHero OnlySaneMan in Homer's epics.
** This also applies to the Gods that were on the Greeks side. Hera's grudge against Aeneas is incredibly petty and excessively destructive. Athena doesn't make an appearance but sends snakes to kill off Laocoon simply for figuring out the trap and warning the Trojans.
* AdultFear: Pyrrhus brutally killing Polites in front of Priam is probably the worst thing you can do to a father.
This list shows the last 10 events of 115. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheAeneid