History Literature / SummersAtCastleAuburn

26th Jun '17 5:07:31 AM XFllo
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* RavenHairIvorySkin: Dark hair and pale skin in a trait that runs in the Halsing family. Elisandra, combining this coloring with her mother's delicate features, is a celebrated court beauty. Corie, though rougher around the edges, also [[SheCleansUpNicely cleans up well]] and has many suitors when she is old enough for the marriage market because of it.

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* RavenHairIvorySkin: RavenHairIvorySkin:
**
Dark hair and pale skin in a trait that runs in the Halsing family. Elisandra, combining this coloring with her mother's delicate features, is a celebrated court beauty. Corie, beauty.
** Elisandra's sister Corie is a black-and-white beauty, too,
though rougher around the edges, she also [[SheCleansUpNicely cleans up well]] and has many suitors when she is old enough for the marriage market because of it.her looks.



* ReallyGetsAround: Bryan is implied to be this.

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%% * ReallyGetsAround: Bryan is implied to be this.



* SpiritedYoungLady: Corie in spades, though she tries to show her spirit in ways that are socially acceptable, such as quietly ruining every attempt to marry her off.
24th May '17 10:37:27 AM CityUser84
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* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Appeared to be averted at the beginning, but then played straight throughout the rest of the story. In the beginning, Corie's grandmother basically comes out and says that her daughter seduced Corie's father with magic and raped him, and this wasn't the first time. But then the trope is played straight in chapter nine when Corie actually blames her father for being raped and even compares him to the villainous [[spoiler: Prince Bryan]] for it and Kent and Elisandra agree with her...! That level of casual victim blaming would probably not go down well if the perpetrator had been male. Furthermore, Corie makes a potion for a lovesick castle guard to use on a girl. The ethics of this are actually explored with regards to using a potion on a female character, as she says her potion will only make the girl notice him, not love him. Corie could make standard love potions, but she doesn't want to practice "that kind of magic," on other female characters. At the end of chapter six she announces that a man is fair game, "assuming he was not a total boor." This fits in with her rather twisted views on her father. Furthermore, the author treats her contempt for male rape victims as part of her enlightenment in the summer she turns seventeen, when she grows up enough to be able to see what is wrong with Castle Auburn.

to:

* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Appeared to be averted at the beginning, but then played straight throughout the rest of the story. In the beginning, Played straight. Early on, Corie's grandmother basically comes out and says admits that her daughter seduced Corie's father with magic and raped him, and this wasn't the first time. But then the trope is played straight in chapter nine when Corie actually blames her father for being raped and even compares him to the villainous [[spoiler: Prince Bryan]] for it and Kent and Elisandra agree with her...! That level of casual victim blaming would probably not go down well if the perpetrator had been male. Furthermore, To emphasize a deliberate double standard based on gender, Corie makes a potion for a lovesick castle guard to use on a girl. The girl, but the ethics of this are actually explored with regards to using a potion on a female character, as she says her potion will only make the girl notice him, not love him. Corie could make standard love potions, but she doesn't want to practice "that kind of magic," magic" on other female characters. At By contrast, at the end of chapter six she announces that a man is should be fair game, "assuming he was not a total boor." This fits in with her rather twisted views on her father. Furthermore, the author treats her contempt for male rape victims as part of her enlightenment in the summer she turns seventeen, when she grows up enough to be able to see what is wrong with Castle Auburn.
16th May '17 12:01:34 PM CityUser84
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* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Appeared to be averted at the beginning, but then played straight throughout the rest of the story. In the beginning, Corie's grandmother basically comes out and says that her daughter seduced Corie's father with magic and raped him, and this wasn't the first time. But then the trope is played straight in chapter nine when Corie actually blames her father for being raped and even compares him to the villainous [[spoiler: Prince Bryan]] for it...! That level of casual victim blaming would probably not go down well if the perpetrator had been male. Furthermore, Corie makes a potion for a lovesick castle guard to use on a girl. The ethics of this are actually explored with regards to using a potion on a female character, as she says her potion will only make the girl notice him, not love him. Corie could make standard love potions, but she doesn't want to practice "that kind of magic," on other female characters. At the end of chapter six she announces that a man is fair game, "assuming he was not a total boor." This fits in with her rather twisted views on her father. Furthermore, the author treats her contempt of male rape victims as part of her enlightenment in the summer she turns seventeen.

to:

* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Appeared to be averted at the beginning, but then played straight throughout the rest of the story. In the beginning, Corie's grandmother basically comes out and says that her daughter seduced Corie's father with magic and raped him, and this wasn't the first time. But then the trope is played straight in chapter nine when Corie actually blames her father for being raped and even compares him to the villainous [[spoiler: Prince Bryan]] for it...it and Kent and Elisandra agree with her...! That level of casual victim blaming would probably not go down well if the perpetrator had been male. Furthermore, Corie makes a potion for a lovesick castle guard to use on a girl. The ethics of this are actually explored with regards to using a potion on a female character, as she says her potion will only make the girl notice him, not love him. Corie could make standard love potions, but she doesn't want to practice "that kind of magic," on other female characters. At the end of chapter six she announces that a man is fair game, "assuming he was not a total boor." This fits in with her rather twisted views on her father. Furthermore, the author treats her contempt of for male rape victims as part of her enlightenment in the summer she turns seventeen.seventeen, when she grows up enough to be able to see what is wrong with Castle Auburn.
16th May '17 11:57:07 AM CityUser84
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* AllGirlsWantBadBoys: Every girl at court, Corie included, is a little in love with the wild, handscome Prince Bryan.

to:

* AllGirlsWantBadBoys: Every girl at court, Corie included, is a little in love with the wild, handscome handsome Prince Bryan.



* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Appeared to be averted at the beginning, but then played straight throughout the rest of the story. Corie's grandmother basically comes out early on and says that her daughter seduced Corie's father with magic and raped him, and this wasn't the first time. But then the trope is played straight in chapter nine when Corie has the nerve to blame her father for being raped and even compares him to the villainous [[spoiler: Prince Bryan]] for it...! That level of casual victim blaming would probably not go down well if the perpetrator had been male. Furthermore, Corie makes a potion for a lovesick castle guard to use on a girl. The ethics of this are actually explored with regards to using a potion on a female character, as she says her potion will only make the girl notice him, not love him. Corie could make standard love potions, but she doesn't want to practice "that kind of magic," on other female characters. At the end of chapter six she announces that a man is fair game, "assuming he was not a total boor." This fits in with her rather twisted views on her father.

to:

* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Appeared to be averted at the beginning, but then played straight throughout the rest of the story. In the beginning, Corie's grandmother basically comes out early on and says that her daughter seduced Corie's father with magic and raped him, and this wasn't the first time. But then the trope is played straight in chapter nine when Corie has the nerve to blame actually blames her father for being raped and even compares him to the villainous [[spoiler: Prince Bryan]] for it...! That level of casual victim blaming would probably not go down well if the perpetrator had been male. Furthermore, Corie makes a potion for a lovesick castle guard to use on a girl. The ethics of this are actually explored with regards to using a potion on a female character, as she says her potion will only make the girl notice him, not love him. Corie could make standard love potions, but she doesn't want to practice "that kind of magic," on other female characters. At the end of chapter six she announces that a man is fair game, "assuming he was not a total boor." This fits in with her rather twisted views on her father. Furthermore, the author treats her contempt of male rape victims as part of her enlightenment in the summer she turns seventeen.
9th May '17 2:54:20 PM CityUser84
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* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Averted. Corie's grandmother basically comes out and says that her daughter seduced Corie's father with magic and raped him, and this wasn't the first time. She basically disowned her daughter after she disappeared. But then the trope is played straight in chapter nine when Corie has the nerve to blame her father for being raped and even compares him to the villainous [[spoiler: Prince Bryan]] for it...! That level of casual victim blaming would probably not go down well if the perpetrator had been male. Furthermore, Corie makes a potion for a lovesick castle guard to use on a girl. The ethics of this are actually explored with regards to using a potion on a female character, as she says her potion will only make the girl notice him, not love him. Corie could make standard love potions, but she doesn't want to practice "that kind of magic," on other female characters. At the end of chapter six she announces that a man is fair game, "assuming he was not a total boor." This fits in with her rather twisted views on her father.

to:

* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Averted. Appeared to be averted at the beginning, but then played straight throughout the rest of the story. Corie's grandmother basically comes out early on and says that her daughter seduced Corie's father with magic and raped him, and this wasn't the first time. She basically disowned her daughter after she disappeared.time. But then the trope is played straight in chapter nine when Corie has the nerve to blame her father for being raped and even compares him to the villainous [[spoiler: Prince Bryan]] for it...! That level of casual victim blaming would probably not go down well if the perpetrator had been male. Furthermore, Corie makes a potion for a lovesick castle guard to use on a girl. The ethics of this are actually explored with regards to using a potion on a female character, as she says her potion will only make the girl notice him, not love him. Corie could make standard love potions, but she doesn't want to practice "that kind of magic," on other female characters. At the end of chapter six she announces that a man is fair game, "assuming he was not a total boor." This fits in with her rather twisted views on her father.
9th May '17 2:52:12 PM CityUser84
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* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Averted. Corie's grandmother basically comes out and says that her daughter seduced Corie's father with magic and raped him, and this wasn't the first time. She basically disowned her daughter after she disappeared. But then the trope is played straight in chapter nine when Corie has the nerve to blame her father for being raped and even compares him to the villainous [[spoiler: Prince Bryan]] for it...! That level of casual victim blaming would probably not go down well if the perpetrator had been male.

to:

* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Averted. Corie's grandmother basically comes out and says that her daughter seduced Corie's father with magic and raped him, and this wasn't the first time. She basically disowned her daughter after she disappeared. But then the trope is played straight in chapter nine when Corie has the nerve to blame her father for being raped and even compares him to the villainous [[spoiler: Prince Bryan]] for it...! That level of casual victim blaming would probably not go down well if the perpetrator had been male. Furthermore, Corie makes a potion for a lovesick castle guard to use on a girl. The ethics of this are actually explored with regards to using a potion on a female character, as she says her potion will only make the girl notice him, not love him. Corie could make standard love potions, but she doesn't want to practice "that kind of magic," on other female characters. At the end of chapter six she announces that a man is fair game, "assuming he was not a total boor." This fits in with her rather twisted views on her father.



* LovePotion: Corie makes some for a lovesick castle guard. The ethics of this are actually explored in the piece as she says her potion will only make the girl notice him, not love him. Corie could make standard love potions, but she doesn't want to practice "that kind of magic."

to:

* LovePotion: Corie makes some for a lovesick castle guard. The ethics of this are actually explored in the piece as she says her potion will only make the girl notice him, not love him. Corie could make standard love potions, but she doesn't want to practice "that kind of magic."magic," on other female characters, but at the end of chapter six she announces that a man is fair game, "assuming he was not a total boor." This fits in with her rather twisted views on her father.
6th May '17 8:43:22 AM CityUser84
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* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Averted. Corie's grandmother basically comes out and says that her daughter seduced Corie's father with magic and raped him, and this wasn't the first time. She basically disowned her daughter after she disappeared. But then the trope is played straight in chapter nine when Corie has the nerve to blame her father for being raped and even compares him to the villainous Prince Bryan for it...! That level of casual victim blaming would probably not go down well if the perpetrator had been male.

to:

* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Averted. Corie's grandmother basically comes out and says that her daughter seduced Corie's father with magic and raped him, and this wasn't the first time. She basically disowned her daughter after she disappeared. But then the trope is played straight in chapter nine when Corie has the nerve to blame her father for being raped and even compares him to the villainous [[spoiler: Prince Bryan Bryan]] for it...! That level of casual victim blaming would probably not go down well if the perpetrator had been male.
6th May '17 8:38:37 AM CityUser84
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* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Averted. Corie's grandmother basically comes out and says that her daughter seduced Corie's father with magic and raped him, and this wasn't the first time. She basically disowned her daughter after she disappeared.

to:

* DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale: Averted. Corie's grandmother basically comes out and says that her daughter seduced Corie's father with magic and raped him, and this wasn't the first time. She basically disowned her daughter after she disappeared. But then the trope is played straight in chapter nine when Corie has the nerve to blame her father for being raped and even compares him to the villainous Prince Bryan for it...! That level of casual victim blaming would probably not go down well if the perpetrator had been male.
2nd Mar '14 9:26:11 AM Bissek
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Added DiffLines:

* WidowedAtTheWedding: Bryan is poisoned at his wedding feast [[spoiler:by his bride.]]
25th Oct '13 1:45:18 PM Umi
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''Summers at Castle Auburn'' tells the story of Coriel, more commonly called Corie, a [[HeroicBastard bastard daughter]] of the illustrious Halsing family. She lives a simple village life with her [[RaisedByGrandparents maternal grandmother]], the local [[WidowWitch wise woman and witch]], as her apprentice until she is six years old when the noble side of her heritage comes to call. Her father is dead, her uncle wishes to see Corie properly cared for. From that year, Corie spends her summers at Castle Auburn with her [[OneeSama blue-blooded half-sister]] Elisandra.

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''Summers at Castle Auburn'' by Sharon Shinn tells the story of Coriel, more commonly called Corie, a [[HeroicBastard bastard daughter]] of the illustrious Halsing family. She lives a simple village life with her [[RaisedByGrandparents maternal grandmother]], the local [[WidowWitch wise woman and witch]], as her apprentice until she is six years old when the noble side of her heritage comes to call. Her father is dead, her uncle wishes to see Corie properly cared for. From that year, Corie spends her summers at Castle Auburn with her [[OneeSama blue-blooded half-sister]] Elisandra.



* HugeGuyTinyGirl: Corie and Elisandra's parent figures (mother in Elisandra's case), Jaxon and Greta. Jaxon is a huge, wild-looking man, while Greta is so small that if she could ever be quiet, people who overlook her. Fortunately for Greta and unfortunately for those around her, she is never quiet.

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* HugeGuyTinyGirl: Corie and Elisandra's parent figures (mother in Elisandra's case), Jaxon and Greta. Jaxon is a huge, wild-looking man, while Greta is so small that if she could ever be quiet, people who would overlook her. Fortunately for Greta and unfortunately for those around her, she is never quiet.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.SummersAtCastleAuburn