History Literature / SolarPons

17th Jan '18 5:10:20 PM foxley
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* WhenTreesAttack: "The Adventure of the Grice-Paterson" features a creeper plant that is able to reach its vines through a window to strangle its victims.

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* WhenTreesAttack: "The Adventure of the Grice-Paterson" Grice-Paterson Curse" features a creeper plant that is able to reach its vines through a window to strangle its victims.
17th Jan '18 5:08:01 PM foxley
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* ManEatingPlant: The solution to one of the mysteries involves a killer vine that drains blood.

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* ManEatingPlant: The solution to one "The Adventure of the mysteries Grice-Paterson Curse" involves a killer vine that drains blood.




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* WhenTreesAttack: "The Adventure of the Grice-Paterson" features a creeper plant that is able to reach its vines through a window to strangle its victims.
17th Jan '18 4:56:07 PM foxley
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* LawyerFriendlyCameo: The stories often feature these by famous characters from detective fiction. For example, "The Adventure of the Orient Express" features an appearance by an unnamed young adventurer who is unmistakably Literature/TheSaint.
13th May '17 11:02:42 AM nombretomado
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The tales in the Pontine canon (as the collected works are known) can be broadly divided into two classes, the straight and the humorous, the straight being more or less straightforward tales of detection in the classic Holmesian mode, while the others--a minority--have some gentle fun, most notably by involving fictional characters from outside either canon (most notably Dr. FuManchu, who recurs); perhaps the most outstanding example is "The Adventure of the Orient Express", in which we encounter, among others, very thinly disguised versions of [[Creator/WSomersetMaugham Ashenden]], Literature/HerculePoirot, and Literature/TheSaint.

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The tales in the Pontine canon (as the collected works are known) can be broadly divided into two classes, the straight and the humorous, the straight being more or less straightforward tales of detection in the classic Holmesian mode, while the others--a minority--have some gentle fun, most notably by involving fictional characters from outside either canon (most notably Dr. FuManchu, Literature/FuManchu, who recurs); perhaps the most outstanding example is "The Adventure of the Orient Express", in which we encounter, among others, very thinly disguised versions of [[Creator/WSomersetMaugham Ashenden]], Literature/HerculePoirot, and Literature/TheSaint.
31st Jan '17 11:27:24 AM Black_Diesel
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[[quoteright:276:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/51p9idkxoql.jpg]]
22nd Jan '17 7:38:26 AM Morgenthaler
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* {{Crossover}}: Including one with the CthulhuMythos.

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* {{Crossover}}: Including one with the CthulhuMythos.Franchise/CthulhuMythos.
2nd Nov '16 12:50:11 AM PaulA
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The tales in the Pontine canon (as the collected works are known) can be broadly divided into two classes, the straight and the humorous, the straight being more or less straightforward tales of detection in the classic Holmesian mode, while the others--a minority--have some gentle fun, most notably by involving fictional characters from outside either canon (most notably Dr. FuManchu, who recurs); perhaps the most outstanding example is "The Adventure of the Orient Express", in which we encounter, among others, very thinly disguised versions of [[Creator/JosephConrad Ashenden]], Literature/HerculePoirot, and Literature/TheSaint.

to:

The tales in the Pontine canon (as the collected works are known) can be broadly divided into two classes, the straight and the humorous, the straight being more or less straightforward tales of detection in the classic Holmesian mode, while the others--a minority--have some gentle fun, most notably by involving fictional characters from outside either canon (most notably Dr. FuManchu, who recurs); perhaps the most outstanding example is "The Adventure of the Orient Express", in which we encounter, among others, very thinly disguised versions of [[Creator/JosephConrad [[Creator/WSomersetMaugham Ashenden]], Literature/HerculePoirot, and Literature/TheSaint.
2nd Nov '16 12:49:10 AM PaulA
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After publication of ''The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes'' in 1927, Conan Doyle stated flatly that there would be no more SherlockHolmes stories, period the end. After waiting a year to see (Doyle had said such things at other times), the young AugustDerleth, then but a college freshman, wrote Doyle a letter asking whether, if it were indeed so that Holmes' career was over, Derleth could publish pastiche tales, though not purporting to be actual Holmes stories. Doyle, it seems, gave the project his blessing, and so was born Solar Pons.

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After publication of ''The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes'' in 1927, Conan Doyle Creator/ArthurConanDoyle stated flatly that there would be no more SherlockHolmes Literature/SherlockHolmes stories, period the end. After waiting a year to see (Doyle had said such things at other times), the young AugustDerleth, Creator/AugustDerleth, then but a college freshman, wrote Doyle a letter asking whether, if it were indeed so that Holmes' career was over, Derleth could publish pastiche tales, though not purporting to be actual Holmes stories. Doyle, it seems, gave the project his blessing, and so was born Solar Pons.



The tales in the Pontine canon (as the collected works are known) can be broadly divided into two classes, the straight and the humorous, the straight being more or less straightforward tales of detection in the classic Holmesian mode, while the others--a minority--have some gentle fun, most notably by involving fictional characters from outside either canon (most notably Dr. FuManchu, who recurs); perhaps the most outstanding example is "The Adventure of the Orient Express", in which we encounter, among others, very thinly disguised versions of Ashenden, Hercule Poirot, and Literature/TheSaint.

to:

The tales in the Pontine canon (as the collected works are known) can be broadly divided into two classes, the straight and the humorous, the straight being more or less straightforward tales of detection in the classic Holmesian mode, while the others--a minority--have some gentle fun, most notably by involving fictional characters from outside either canon (most notably Dr. FuManchu, who recurs); perhaps the most outstanding example is "The Adventure of the Orient Express", in which we encounter, among others, very thinly disguised versions of Ashenden, Hercule Poirot, [[Creator/JosephConrad Ashenden]], Literature/HerculePoirot, and Literature/TheSaint.
8th Mar '14 4:38:52 AM alchixinren
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* DiabolicalMastmermind: Kroll is the spymaster version of this.

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* DiabolicalMastmermind: DiabolicalMastermind: Kroll is the spymaster version of this.
17th Sep '13 8:46:19 PM AmbarSonofDeshar
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* {{Archenemy}}: Baron Ennesfred Kroll, the German spy who fullfills the Moriarty role.


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* DiabolicalMastmermind: Kroll is the spymaster version of this.
* HeterosexualLifepartners: Pons and Parker


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* TheSpymaster: Pons' archenemy, Baron Kroll is a German spymaster with a wide network of agents throughout England and the continent.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.SolarPons