History Literature / SherlockHolmes

14th Feb '17 5:26:39 PM SwampAdder
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* "Silver Blaze"

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* "Silver "The Adventure of Silver Blaze"



* "The Final Problem" (Watson reports the death of Holmes; [[ArchEnemy Professor Moriarty]] is introduced)

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* "The Adventure of the Final Problem" (Watson reports the death of Holmes; [[ArchEnemy Professor Moriarty]] is introduced)
12th Feb '17 1:12:42 PM morenohijazo
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Added DiffLines:

* TheWickedStage: In the story ''A Scandal in Bohemia'', the titular detective is hired by a foreign king to find and steal the evidence of the king's scandalous love affair in case it gets used for blackmail. What makes the affair scandalous is, of course, that it was with an opera singer - a profession only one step at most above actress. Amusingly, in order to retain the scandalous feel of the affair in a more modern setting, the modernised adaptation in ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' had to change her from an opera singer to a ''lesbian dominatrix''.
5th Feb '17 7:48:10 AM SwampAdder
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* {{Retcon}}: Remember that for seven years after "The Final Problem" was published, Holmes was dead, then the fandom bugged Creator/ArthurConanDoyle enough that he wrote "The Empty House".

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* {{Retcon}}: Remember that for seven years after "The Final Problem" was published, Holmes was dead, then the fandom bugged Creator/ArthurConanDoyle Creator/ArthurConanDoyle's publishers offered him enough money that he wrote "The Empty House".
4th Feb '17 3:55:26 PM SwampAdder
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* InterClassRomance: "A Scandal in Bohemia" has the "rich guy, common girl" romance with the Prince of Bohemia and Miss Irene Adler. Used to show how superior the resourceful and clever Miss Adler is to her 'superior':

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* InterClassRomance: "A Scandal in Bohemia" has the "rich guy, common girl" romance with the Prince of Bohemia and Miss Irene Adler. Used to show how superior the resourceful and clever Miss Adler is to her 'superior':"superior":



* LivingEmotionalCrutch: Watson to Holmes, according to some interpretations.



* LondonTown: 221B Baker Street did not exist at the time (the house numbers only went up to 100 there). Later 221 would be assigned to the Abbey National Building Society (who had to hire a full-time clerk specifically to deal with Sherlock-related fanmail), which has now vacated that office. 221B is allocated to the museum, located between 237 and 241 Baker Street.

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* LondonTown: 221B Baker Street did not exist at the time (the house numbers only went up to 100 there). Later 221 would be assigned to the Abbey National Building Society (who had to hire a full-time clerk specifically to deal with Sherlock-related fanmail), which has now vacated that office. 221B is now allocated to the museum, located between 237 and 241 Baker Street.



* MandatoryUnretirement: In "His Last Bow", Holmes, who had retired to the country to raise bees, is revealed to have come out of retirement at the behest of the Prime Minister to catch a German spy. (Doyle wrote one more short story collection later, but in universe, "His Last Bow", set in 1914, is the last Sherlock Holmes story.)

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* MandatoryUnretirement: In "His Last Bow", Holmes, who had retired to the country to raise bees, is revealed to have come out of retirement at the behest of the Prime Minister to catch a German spy. (Doyle wrote one more short story collection later, but in universe, "His Last Bow", set in 1914, is the last Sherlock Holmes story.story chronologically.)



* MasterOfDisguise: Holmes often disguised himself for his investigations, and in most instances not even Watson recognized him. Notably, Watson can't see through Holmes's disguise when he first returns to London after pretending to be dead. Watson faints when Holmes takes off his disguise.

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* MasterOfDisguise: Holmes often disguised disguises himself for his investigations, and in most instances not even Watson recognized recognizes him. Notably, Watson can't see through Holmes's disguise when he first returns to London after pretending to be dead. Watson faints when Holmes takes off his disguise.



** "The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger" opens with a veiled threat to whomever has been attempting to steal Watson's papers that if the attempts continue, he'll publicise the full details regarding "the politician, the lighthouse and the trained cormorant".

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** "The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger" opens with a veiled threat to whomever has been attempting to steal Watson's papers that if the attempts continue, he'll publicise the full details regarding "the politician, the lighthouse and the trained cormorant".



** Gilbert Adair, in the somewhat bizarre finale 'And then there was no one' to his trilogy of murder mystery pastiches, actually gives the full story of 'The Giant Rat of Sumatra'. And it's surprisingly Doyle-like.



-->''(Holmes speaking)'' "You're not hurt, Watson? For God's sake, say that you are not hurt!"\\
It was worth a wound--it was worth many wounds--to know the depth of loyalty and love which lay behind that cold mask. The clear, hard eyes were dimmed for a moment, and the firm lips were shaking. For the one and only time I caught a glimpse of a great heart as well as of a great brain. All my years of humble but single-minded service culminated in that moment of revelation.
** [[TranquilFury "By the Lord, it is well for you. If you had killed Watson, you would not have gotten out of this room alive."]]
** There are a few minor examples of Holmes' unshockable demeanour being cracked by a sufficiently out-of-the-blue revelation: "The Adventure if the Noble Bachelor," when Watson reads that the bride went missing; "The Second Stain," when Watson tells him he won't be able to talk to one of his suspects, because he's dead; and "The Man with the Twisted Lip," when the wife of a man thought to be dead announces she's had a letter from him.

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-->''(Holmes speaking)'' "You're not hurt, Watson? For God's sake, say that you are not hurt!"\\
It was worth a wound--it was worth many wounds--to know the depth of loyalty and love which lay behind that cold mask. The clear, hard eyes were dimmed for a moment, and the firm lips were shaking. For the one and only time I caught a glimpse of a great heart as well as of a great brain. All my years of humble but single-minded service culminated in that moment of revelation.
** [[TranquilFury "By the Lord, it is well for you. If you had killed Watson, you would not have gotten out of this room alive."]]
** There are a few minor examples of Holmes' unshockable demeanour being cracked by a sufficiently out-of-the-blue revelation: "The Adventure if the Noble Bachelor," when Watson reads that the bride went missing; "The Second Stain," when Watson tells him he won't be able to talk to one of his suspects, because he's dead; and "The Man with the Twisted Lip," when the wife of a man thought to be dead announces she's just had a letter from him.
4th Feb '17 3:31:37 PM SwampAdder
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* FakingTheDead: "The Man with the Twisted Lip," and {{Retcon}}ned in for ''The Return of Sherlock Holmes.''

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* FakingTheDead: "The Man with the Twisted Lip," Lip", "The Norwood Builder", and {{Retcon}}ned in for ''The Return of Sherlock Holmes.''



* GeniusSlob: Holmes could very well be the TropeCodifier. While always ''personally'' well-kept, Holmes's concept of organisation amounted to keeping his tobacco in the toe of his Persian slipper, his cigars in the coal-scuttle, and his unanswered letters jack-knifed to the mantelpiece, all the while conducting foul-smelling chemical experiments in his study, and even using his walls for target practice.

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* GeniusSlob: Holmes could very well be the TropeCodifier. While always ''personally'' well-kept, Holmes's concept of organisation amounted to keeping his tobacco in the toe of his Persian slipper, his cigars in the coal-scuttle, and his unanswered letters jack-knifed to the mantelpiece, all the while conducting foul-smelling chemical experiments in his study, and even using his sitting-room walls for target practice.



-->"Upon my word, Watson! I owe you both my thanks and an apology. It was an unjustifiable experiment even for one’s self, and doubly so for a friend. I am really very sorry. [...] It would be superfluous to drive us mad, my dear Watson. A candid observer would [[WhatWereYouThinking certainly declare that we were so already]] before we embarked upon so wild an experiment."

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-->"Upon my word, Watson! I owe you both my thanks and an apology. It was an unjustifiable experiment even for one’s self, and doubly so for a friend. I am really very sorry. [...] It -->"It would be superfluous to drive us mad, my dear Watson. A candid observer would [[WhatWereYouThinking certainly declare that we were so already]] before we embarked upon so wild an experiment."
4th Feb '17 1:53:26 PM SwampAdder
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* ArcWords: "The Second Stain" was mentioned several times before its publication.
* {{Arcadia}}: Deconstructed in "The Copper Beeches". On a trip into the countryside, Watson comments on the beauty of the country farmhouses, to which Holmes responded by pointing out that isolation enables criminals and abusers to get away with it much more easily than they could in the crowded city.

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* ArcWords: "The Second Stain" was mentioned several times before its publication.
* {{Arcadia}}: Deconstructed in "The Copper Beeches". On a trip into the countryside, Watson comments on the beauty of the country farmhouses, to which Holmes responded responds by pointing out that isolation enables criminals and abusers to get away with it much more easily than they could in the crowded city.



** Scandal in Bohemia may also count, although Irene Adler's villainy is debatable.



* BerserkButton: Don't compare Holmes to any other detective, even a fictional one. And more SugarWiki/{{heartwarming|Moments}}ly, don't even attempt to do any harm to Watson in front of Holmes. [[BigBrotherInstinct That's not the type of thing he likes. At all.]] Holmes also appears to really, ''really'' despise blackmailers; most of the AssholeVictim characters whose murderers he refused to expose unless he needed to save an innocent were blackmailers, the remainder mostly being abusive drunks.

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* BerserkButton: Don't compare Holmes to any other detective, even a fictional one. And more SugarWiki/{{heartwarming|Moments}}ly, don't even attempt to do any harm to Watson in front of Holmes. [[BigBrotherInstinct That's not the type of thing he likes. At all.]] Holmes also appears to really, ''really'' despise blackmailers; most of the AssholeVictim characters whose murderers he refused to expose unless he needed to save an innocent were blackmailers, the remainder mostly being abusive drunks.



* BigBrotherInstinct: This is what happens if you ''seriously'' get him pissed- especially if you attempt to harm Watson in front of Holmes. [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming Please don't do it.]]
* BewareTheQuietOnes: Holmes, definitely. If you get a gentle soul pissed, you'll get a FateWorseThanDeath. Threaten to harm Watson (or, God help you, actually ''harm'') him you won't get off that easily.



* BrilliantButLazy: Mycroft is not only an AloofBigBrother to Sherlock, he's an even better detective. Subverted in that, while Mycroft is physically lazy, he's actually an extremely hard-working civil servant whose encyclopedic knowledge frequently decides British national policy. Mycroft could easily have been a detective himself, but as he explains in "The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans" he loathes the idea of doing the legwork needed to actually gather the facts he'd need to make his deductions. Sherlock himself indulges in long periods of lethargy and substance abuse when there's no case to be solved.

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* BrilliantButLazy: Mycroft is not only an AloofBigBrother to Sherlock, he's an even better detective.at the science of deduction. Subverted in that, while Mycroft is physically lazy, he's actually an extremely hard-working civil servant whose encyclopedic knowledge frequently decides British national policy. Mycroft could easily have been a detective himself, but as he explains in "The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans" he loathes the idea of doing the legwork needed to actually gather the facts he'd need to make his deductions. Sherlock himself indulges in long periods of lethargy and substance abuse when there's no case to be solved.



*** Holmes himself may sometimes qualify as this, although his "periods of lethargy" as described by Watson often come closer to full-on manic depression than simple laziness.

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*** Holmes ** Sherlock himself may sometimes qualify as this, although his "periods of lethargy" as described by Watson often come closer to full-on manic depression than simple laziness.



* TheCasanova: Baron Gruner, the villain of "The Illustrious Client" is described as “extraordinarily handsome, with a most fascinating manner. a gentle voice and that air of romance and mystery which means so much to a woman. He is said to have the whole sex at his mercy and to have made ample use of the fact.”

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* TheCasanova: Baron Gruner, the villain of "The Illustrious Client" is described as “extraordinarily handsome, with a most fascinating manner. manner, a gentle voice voice, and that air of romance and mystery which means so much to a woman. He is said to have the whole sex at his mercy and to have made ample use of the fact.”



** Mycroft as well.

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** Mycroft as well.well (probably).



** This is actually justified given Watson's army background. You don't fight fair in the army- you fight ''to win''.

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** This is actually justified given Watson's army background. You don't fight fair in the army- army -- you fight ''to win''.



* CrammingTheCoffin: In In "The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax", the villains are too squeamish to commit murder outright, so they chloroform Lady Frances and hide her in the coffin containing the body of her old nurse, which is due to buried the next day.

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* CrammingTheCoffin: In In "The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax", the villains are too squeamish to commit murder outright, so they chloroform Lady Frances and hide her in the coffin containing the body of her old nurse, which is due to buried the next day.



* CurtainCamouflage: In the adventure "Charles Augustus Milverton", Holmes and Watson break into a blackmailer's house and duck under a curtain when they hear Charles coming in.

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* CurtainCamouflage: In the adventure "Charles Augustus Milverton", Holmes and Watson break into a blackmailer's house and duck under a curtain when they hear Charles Milverton coming in.



* DefrostingIceQueen: Holmes when Watson is wounded.



* DownerEnding: Quite a few of these, including "Five Orange Pips", "The Final Problem", "Dancing Men" and ''The Valley of Fear''. The ultimate example has to be "Cardboard Box", in which every single player in the crime is a victim of another player's gainless vindictiveness; Holmes remarks that it's almost enough to make one lose his faith in God.

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* DownerEnding: Quite a few of these, including "Five Orange Pips", "The Final Problem", "Dancing Men" and ''The Valley of Fear''. The ultimate example has to be "Cardboard "The Cardboard Box", in which every single player in the crime is a victim of another player's gainless vindictiveness; Holmes remarks that it's almost enough to make one lose his faith in God.
4th Feb '17 1:07:23 PM SwampAdder
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* HeterosexualLifePartners: The ultimate example.
** Slightly subverted; Holmes is canonically aromantic and asexual (so not heterosexual), and Watson [[HoYay sure likes to admire his form]].

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* HeterosexualLifePartners: The ultimate example.
** Slightly subverted;
example. (At least, ''Watson'' appears to be straight. Holmes is canonically aromantic and asexual (so not heterosexual), and Watson [[HoYay sure likes to admire his form]].a bit of a [[CelibateEccentricGenius mystery]]...)



* TheStoner: Cocaine, naturally. Holmes only does it whe he's bored.



* TitleDrop: "The Speckled Band" is spoken in-story as part of a woman's last words.



** AssholeVictim - Several times; see the AssholeVictim entry above.
** DefectiveDetective - Holmes eccentricities are portrayed very differently from more modern depictions of the detective. While the modern DefectiveDetective can credit much of their forensic skills to their eccentricities, they also at times hinder the detective.
** ForensicDrama - Holmes simply explains all of his forensic analysis at the end, with the reader seldom privy to intermediate steps.
** PoliceProcedural - Sherlock Holmes, a private detective, is seldom described doing the same procedure exactly the same way. He is also wildly inconsistent on whether or not he does detailed interviews of witnesses. The police, who do follow a set procedure, generally don't get the job done.

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** AssholeVictim - AssholeVictim: Several times; see the AssholeVictim entry above.
** DefectiveDetective - Holmes DefectiveDetective: Holmes' eccentricities are portrayed very differently from more modern depictions of the detective. While the modern DefectiveDetective can credit much of their forensic skills to their eccentricities, they also at times hinder the detective.
** ForensicDrama - ForensicDrama: Holmes simply explains all of his forensic analysis at the end, with the reader seldom privy to intermediate steps.
** PoliceProcedural - PoliceProcedural: Sherlock Holmes, a private detective, is seldom described doing the same procedure exactly the same way. He is also wildly inconsistent on whether or not he does detailed interviews of witnesses. The police, who do follow a set procedure, generally don't get the job done.



* WeWouldHaveToldYouBut: A few times, Holmes has occasionally deceived Watson in order to trick his quarry. One prominent example is "The Dying Detective"--in order to maintain the ruse that he was deathly ill, he forbade Watson from examining him with the excuse that [[YouDontWantToCatchThis the disease in question was contagious by touch]]. As he later explained, he had little faith in Watson's ability to deceive others (he wanted Culverton Smith to believe Holmes was truly ill with the disease), but a ''good deal'' of respect for Watson's medical skills.

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* WeWouldHaveToldYouBut: A few times, Holmes has occasionally deceived Watson in order to trick his quarry. One prominent example is "The Dying Detective"--in Detective" -- in order to maintain the ruse that he was deathly ill, he forbade Watson from examining him with the excuse that [[YouDontWantToCatchThis the disease in question was contagious by touch]]. As he later explained, he had little faith in Watson's ability to deceive others (he wanted Culverton Smith to believe Holmes was truly ill with the disease), but a ''good deal'' of respect for Watson's medical skills.



* WorthyOpponent: In ''The Adventures Of Sherlock Holmes'', we have John Clay in ''The Red-Headed League'', who is so hard to catch that he and Holmes never see each other until the story. This trope kicks in near the end-Clay outright praises Holmes for his arrangements and quick thinking, while Holmes compliments Clay for his excellent scheme and how close it came to succeeding. Furthermore, although Clay is outright rude to Inspector Jones, he bows to Holmes and Watson as he heads off to jail.

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* WorthyOpponent: In ''The Adventures Of Sherlock Holmes'', we have John Clay in ''The Red-Headed League'', who is so hard to catch that he and Holmes never see each other until the story. This trope kicks in near the end-Clay end -- Clay outright praises Holmes for his arrangements and quick thinking, while Holmes compliments Clay for his excellent scheme and how close it came to succeeding. Furthermore, although Clay is outright rude to Inspector Jones, he bows to Holmes and Watson as he heads off to jail.
27th Jan '17 11:32:43 AM benda
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* ExtremelyColdCase: "The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual". In the course of investigating a present-day disappearance, Holmes solves a mystery dating back to the Civil War.

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* ExtremelyColdCase: "The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual". In the course of investigating a present-day disappearance, Holmes solves a mystery dating back to the English Civil War.
27th Jan '17 8:53:20 AM benda
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Added DiffLines:

** Then again, he's explicitly said once that he will read some Petrarch; and he's known to have discussed some strictly linguistical problems with no possible bearing on any crime whatsoever.
21st Jan '17 7:29:00 PM ProfessorGrimm
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** Many Holmes scholars have noted that people and places Watson gives in his accounts - villages, street names, British nobility, etc simply don't exist. We can only assume that Watson created false names for the sake of client confidentiality, which makes sense since Holmes would probably be unemployed if his clients felt they couldn't trust him.

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** Many Holmes scholars have noted that people and places Watson gives in his accounts - villages, street names, British nobility, etc simply don't exist. We can only assume that Watson created false names for the sake of client confidentiality, which makes sense since Holmes would probably wouldn't be unemployed in demand if all the world knew of his clients felt they couldn't trust him.clients' personal problems. The King of Bohemia as described in "A Scandal in Bohemia" is from an entirely fictitious Royal House (The real life king of Bohemia was also king of Hungary, Croatia, and Emperor of Austria) and therefore has to be a stand in for some other European monarch a subject rife for fan speculation, but King Edward VII is the most popular choice.
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