History Literature / SherlockHolmes

24th Jun '17 2:59:34 AM PaulA
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* DetectivePatsy:
** In "The Adventure of the Retired Colourman", the title character hires Holmes to determine what became of his runaway wife, only for Holmes to prove that he murdered her himself.
--->''"You certainly seem to have met every difficulty," said the inspector. "Of course, he was bound to call us in, but why he should have gone to you I can't understand."\\
"Pure swank!" Holmes answered. "He felt so clever and so sure of himself that he imagined no one could touch him. He could say to any suspicious neighbour, 'Look at the steps I have taken. I have consulted not only the police but even Sherlock Holmes.'"''
** Mentioned as a possibility in "The Problem of Thor Bridge". A man hires Holmes to prove that the woman he loves is innocent of a murder she has been accused of, and more than one person expresses the belief that he's so confident she didn't do it because he did it himself. This turns out not to be the case, however.
23rd Jun '17 6:45:35 PM PaulA
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* BornInTheWrongCentury: Watson says of Sir Robert Nortberton, the antagonist in "The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place", that "he is one of those men who have overshot their true generation", being a deplorable scoundrel by modern standards in a way that would have fit right in among the gentry of RegencyEngland.

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* BornInTheWrongCentury: Watson says of Sir Robert Nortberton, Norberton, the antagonist in "The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place", that "he is one of those men who have overshot their true generation", being a deplorable scoundrel by modern standards in a way that would have fit right in among the gentry of RegencyEngland.
23rd Jun '17 6:42:06 PM PaulA
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* BornInTheWrongCentury: Watson says of Sir Robert Nortberton, the antagonist in "The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place", that "he is one of those men who have overshot their true generation", being a deplorable scoundrel by modern standards in a way that would have fit right in among the gentry of RegencyEngland.


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* DeadPersonImpersonation: [[spoiler:In "The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place", Holmes is called to investigate the strange behavior of Lady Beatrice Falder and her brother, Sir Robert Norberton. He discovers that Lady Beatrice had died and Sir Robert had arranged for an impostor to take her place temporarily so that he could secure the family fortunes before her death became known.]]
21st Jun '17 4:29:53 AM PaulA
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* AnimalAssassin: "The Adventure of the Speckled Band" and "The Adventure of the Lion's Mane".

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* AnimalAssassin: In "The Adventure of the Speckled Band" and "The Adventure of Band", the Lion's Mane".villain murdered his victim by letting a venomous snake into her bedroom while she slept.



* [[CallToAgriculture Call to Apiculture]]: Holmes retires to keep bees on the Sussex Downs. In "The Lion's Mane" he writes of "the soothing life of Nature for which [he] had so often yearned", a rather hypocritical statement given Holmes used to describe the countryside as the birthplace of the most horrible crimes.

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* [[CallToAgriculture Call to Apiculture]]: CallToAgriculture: Holmes retires to keep bees on the Sussex Downs. In "The Lion's Mane" he writes of "the soothing life of Nature for which [he] had so often yearned", a rather hypocritical statement given Holmes used to describe the countryside as the birthplace of the most horrible crimes.



* ExitPursuedByABear: "The Speckled Band", "Silver Blaze", "The Lion's Mane"

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* ExitPursuedByABear: ExitPursuedByABear:
** In
"The Speckled Band", the villain is killed by his own AnimalAssassin after Holmes deflects it from its intended victim.
** In
"Silver Blaze", "The Lion's Mane"a man who was apparently murdered with a blunt weapon was actually killed in self-defense by the eponymous racehorse.



* IWantMyBelovedToBeHappy: In "The Lion's Mane", a man dies horribly on the day he was planning to elope with his fiancée. One of the suspects is a friend of the victim's who was in love with the same woman and is assumed to harbor some ill feeling toward his rival. After he is cleared, he explains that, once he was sure she would be happier with his friend he was content to stand aside, and even helped them arrange the elopement.



* OddballInTheSeries: In his later years Conan Doyle apparently got bored with Watson as narrator. Two of the last stories he wrote, "The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier" and "The Adventure of the Lion's Mane", are narrated by Holmes and do not feature Watson at all. Two more of the later stories, "His Last Bow" and "The Mazarin Stone", are told from a third-person POV. They are the only stories in the canon where Sherlock's adventures are told in third person.

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* OddballInTheSeries: In his later years Conan Doyle apparently got bored with Watson as narrator. Two of the last stories he wrote, "The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier" and "The Adventure of the Lion's Mane", are narrated by Holmes Holmes, and do the latter does not feature Watson at all. Two more of the later stories, "His Last Bow" and "The Mazarin Stone", are told from a third-person POV. They are the only stories in the canon where Sherlock's adventures are told in third person.
10th Jun '17 2:17:35 PM PaulA
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* {{Oxbridge}}: "The Adventure of the Creeping Man" is set in the university town of "Camford".



* PsychoSerum: Involved in "The Creeping Man"

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* PsychoSerum: Involved in In "The Adventure of the Creeping Man"Man", the title character is revealed to be taking a rejuvenating serum derived from monkeys, which as a side effect causes him to take on the attributes of a monkey.
9th Jun '17 9:23:53 PM PaulA
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* SpicyLatina: Isadora Klein in "The Three Gables" (Spanish), Mrs. Ferguson in "The Sussex Vampire" (Peruvian), and Mrs. Gibson in "Thor Bridge" (Brazilian), are all noted for great beauty and HotBlooded personality.


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* SuicideNotMurder: In "The Problem of Thor Bridge", a woman is suspected of murdering her employer's wife; it turns out that the wife committed suicide after planting evidence pointing to the woman she considered her rival, and having devised a method for the murder weapon to be removed from the scene after it had done its work.
8th Jun '17 1:13:20 AM TimeLordVictorious
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* TheBadGuyWins: In "A Case of Identity", this happens because of Holmes' sexism. He thinks it's better not to tell his client that her disappeared fiancé was actually her step-father [[WigDressAccent in disguise]], because (according to Holmes) "there is danger for him who taketh the tiger cub, and danger also for whoso snatches a delusion from a woman". Holmes even agrees with the culprit that--loathsome though Holmes personally finds him--nothing he's done is legally actionable, despite the fact that [[BreachOfPromiseOfMarriage breach of promise]] was a serious thing and she would certainly have won a civil suit against him.



* TheBadGuyWins: In "A Case of Identity", this happens because of Holmes' sexism. He thinks it's better not to tell his client that her disappeared fiancé was actually her step-father [[WigDressAccent in disguise]], because (according to Holmes) "there is danger for him who taketh the tiger cub, and danger also for whoso snatches a delusion from a woman". Holmes even agrees with the culprit that--loathsome though Holmes personally finds him--nothing he's done is legally actionable, despite the fact that [[BreachOfPromiseOfMarriage breach of promise]] was a serious thing and she would certainly have won a civil suit against him.
8th Jun '17 1:12:35 AM TimeLordVictorious
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* BadassBoast: Moriarty to Sherlock in ''The Final Problem''.
-->'''Moriarty:''' "If you are clever enough to bring destruction upon me, rest assured that I shall do as much to you."
6th Jun '17 8:28:11 AM PaulA
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!Short Stories Contains Examples of:

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!Short Stories Contains Examples !!Short stories contain examples of:



* BittersweetEnding: Quite a few, including ''The Sign of the Four'' and "A Scandal in Bohemia".
* BilingualBonus: Sherlock Holmes quotes Flaubert (in ''The Red-Headed League'') and Goethe (in ''Literature/TheSignOfTheFour'') in the original languages.

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* BittersweetEnding: Quite a few, including ''The Sign of the Four'' and "A Scandal in Bohemia".
* BilingualBonus: Sherlock Holmes quotes Flaubert (in ''The Red-Headed League'') and Goethe (in ''Literature/TheSignOfTheFour'') in the original languages.French in "The Red-Headed League".



* DownerEnding: Quite a few of these, including "Five Orange Pips", "The Final Problem", "Dancing Men" and ''The Valley of Fear''. The ultimate example has to be "The Cardboard Box", in which every single player in the crime is a victim of another player's gainless vindictiveness; Holmes remarks that it's almost enough to make one lose his faith in God.

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* DownerEnding: Quite a few of these, including "Five Orange Pips", "The Final Problem", "Dancing Men" and ''The Valley of Fear''. The ultimate example has to be "The Cardboard Box", in which every single player in the crime is a victim of another player's gainless vindictiveness; Holmes remarks that it's almost enough to make one lose his faith in God.



* PoliceAreUseless: In the early stories, the men of Scotland Yard were a collection of incompetent dullards who'd have trouble catching a cold, much less a criminal. In ''The Sign of the Four'' Holmes proclaims "I would rather have the help of Toby (a dog) than the entire detective force of London!" Holmes' dim view of the police was actually TruthInTelevision at the time, such as fouling up the investigation of the UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper murders, and as the real-life police took steps to improve their investigative techniques, their depictions in the stories also improved to the point where Inspector Gregson was praised for his courage and Inspector Lestrade was a more thorough investigator who simply lacked Holmes' HyperAwareness. The police were also generally portrayed as having their own merits and being capable of solving the everyday cases that were beneath Holmes' notice. However, in "The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge", the country detective Baynes is nearly up to Holmes' standard for observation (finding and analyzing the crumpled note in the fireplace) and tactical cleverness (the false arrest). Holmes handsomely congratulates him, saying "You will rise high in your profession."

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* PoliceAreUseless: In the early stories, the men of Scotland Yard were a collection of incompetent dullards who'd have trouble catching a cold, much less a criminal. In ''The Sign of the Four'' Holmes proclaims "I would rather have the help of Toby (a dog) than the entire detective force of London!" Holmes' dim view of the police was actually TruthInTelevision at the time, such as fouling up the investigation of the UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper murders, and as the real-life police took steps to improve their investigative techniques, their depictions in the stories also improved to the point where Inspector Gregson was praised for his courage and Inspector Lestrade was a more thorough investigator who simply lacked Holmes' HyperAwareness. The police were also generally portrayed as having their own merits and being capable of solving the everyday cases that were beneath Holmes' notice. However, in "The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge", the country detective Baynes is nearly up to Holmes' standard for observation (finding and analyzing the crumpled note in the fireplace) and tactical cleverness (the false arrest). Holmes handsomely congratulates him, saying "You will rise high in your profession."



* ScoobyDooHoax: Every single time Holmes encounters a "supernatural" phenomenon, he will use his deductive powers and knowledge of esoteric elements to determine not only that it was a hoax, but exactly how it was done. ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' is perhaps one of the most famous examples.



* UnexpectedInheritance: A major part of ''The Sign of the Four'' and "The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist". A fake one is used in "The Adventure of the Three Garridebs" and "The Adventure of the Norwood Builder".

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* UnexpectedInheritance: A major part of ''The Sign of the Four'' and "The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist". A fake one is used in "The Adventure of the Three Garridebs" and "The Adventure of the Norwood Builder".



* WholeEpisodeFlashback: "The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual" and "The Adventure of the ''Gloria Scott''" . Three out of the four novels also feature this, namely ''A Study in Scarlet'', ''The Sign of the Four'', and ''The Valley of Fear''. This is mostly the reason why ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' became the most filmed Canonical story ever and consequently the most famous.

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* WholeEpisodeFlashback: "The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual" and "The Adventure of the ''Gloria Scott''" . Three out of the four novels also feature this, namely ''A Study in Scarlet'', ''The Sign of the Four'', and ''The Valley of Fear''. This is mostly the reason why ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' became the most filmed Canonical story ever and consequently the most famous.Scott''" have Holmes recounting cases from before he met Watson.
6th Jun '17 8:09:38 AM PaulA
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* FollowTheLeader: Many later detective characters -- Literature/HerculePoirot, Literature/NeroWolfe, Series/InspectorMorse, etc. -- were influenced by Holmes in one way or another. Of course, Holmes himself was inspired in no small measure by Poe's Literature/CAugusteDupin. This is even [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by Watson in the first novel, although Holmes dismisses the resemblance with characteristic smugness. There's also a possible ShoutOut in the new movie, where Watson's fiancée mentions that she likes detective novels and lists Poe as one such author.



* GenrePopularizer: Other detectives had come before, but Holmes is arguably responsible for popularizing the detective story in its modern, standalone form.



* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: This series practically defines the England of the late nineteenth century for most readers. The state of politics and science nails the period down, and decades of fans have generally been able to pinpoint the exact years most of the years were set in.
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