History Literature / SherlockHolmes

19th Mar '17 4:12:03 PM davah301
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* RichesToRags: Dr. Watson's older (deceased) brother, who inherited a good amount of money, but threw it all away and lived in poverty (with short intervals of prosperity) before dying after turning to drink. Holmes deduces all this by simply looking at Watson's watch, which he inherited from his brother.
16th Mar '17 9:37:05 PM Sylderon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* UnexpectedInheritance: A major part of ''The Sign of the Four'' and "The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist". A fake one is used in "The Adventure of the Three Garridebs".

to:

* UnexpectedInheritance: A major part of ''The Sign of the Four'' and "The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist". A fake one is used in "The Adventure of the Three Garridebs".Garridebs" and "The Adventure of the Norwood Builder".
16th Mar '17 9:28:33 PM Sylderon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ThrowTheDogABone: Very occasionally, Watson is allowed to figure things out for himself.

to:

* ThrowTheDogABone: Very occasionally, Watson is allowed to figure things out for himself. For instance, in "The Norwood Builder" Holmes performs a SherlockScan on their client, and Watson knows how Holmes reached his conclusions before Holmes tells him.
16th Mar '17 9:22:59 PM Sylderon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HigherUnderstandingThroughDrugs: Sherlock Holmes uses cocaine (legal in VictorianLondon) when he ''[[InvertedTrope doesn't]]'' have a case, because otherwise his mind will burn out like a powerful engine running without a load (or, as he himself said "My mind is like a racing engine, tearing itself to pieces because it is not connected up with the work for which it was built"). Played straight with tobacco: he famously calls one case "quite a three-pipe problem" and solves another by sitting up all night and smoking an ounce of shag tobacco.

to:

* HigherUnderstandingThroughDrugs: Sherlock Holmes uses cocaine (legal in VictorianLondon) when he ''[[InvertedTrope doesn't]]'' have a case, because otherwise his mind will burn out like a powerful engine running without a load (or, as he himself said "My mind is like a racing engine, tearing itself to pieces because it is not connected up with the work for which it was built"). Played straight with tobacco: he famously calls one case "quite a three-pipe problem" and solves another by sitting up all night and smoking an ounce of shag tobacco.



* TechnoBabble: In "The Missing Three-Quarter", the captain of a football team rattles off a massive speech of football terms that explains why his team is screwed if Holmes doesn't find his missing three-quarter.

to:

* TechnoBabble: In "The Missing Three-Quarter", the captain of a football rugby team rattles off a massive speech of football rugby terms that explains why his team is screwed if Holmes doesn't find his missing three-quarter.
16th Mar '17 7:33:52 AM Sylderon
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** The last words of the murdered secretary in "The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez" are also a clue, though what they mean is only discovered at the very end.
14th Feb '17 5:26:39 PM SwampAdder
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* "Silver Blaze"

to:

* "Silver "The Adventure of Silver Blaze"



* "The Final Problem" (Watson reports the death of Holmes; [[ArchEnemy Professor Moriarty]] is introduced)

to:

* "The Adventure of the Final Problem" (Watson reports the death of Holmes; [[ArchEnemy Professor Moriarty]] is introduced)
12th Feb '17 1:12:42 PM morenohijazo
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* TheWickedStage: In the story ''A Scandal in Bohemia'', the titular detective is hired by a foreign king to find and steal the evidence of the king's scandalous love affair in case it gets used for blackmail. What makes the affair scandalous is, of course, that it was with an opera singer - a profession only one step at most above actress. Amusingly, in order to retain the scandalous feel of the affair in a more modern setting, the modernised adaptation in ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' had to change her from an opera singer to a ''lesbian dominatrix''.
5th Feb '17 7:48:10 AM SwampAdder
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Retcon}}: Remember that for seven years after "The Final Problem" was published, Holmes was dead, then the fandom bugged Creator/ArthurConanDoyle enough that he wrote "The Empty House".

to:

* {{Retcon}}: Remember that for seven years after "The Final Problem" was published, Holmes was dead, then the fandom bugged Creator/ArthurConanDoyle Creator/ArthurConanDoyle's publishers offered him enough money that he wrote "The Empty House".
4th Feb '17 3:55:26 PM SwampAdder
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* InterClassRomance: "A Scandal in Bohemia" has the "rich guy, common girl" romance with the Prince of Bohemia and Miss Irene Adler. Used to show how superior the resourceful and clever Miss Adler is to her 'superior':

to:

* InterClassRomance: "A Scandal in Bohemia" has the "rich guy, common girl" romance with the Prince of Bohemia and Miss Irene Adler. Used to show how superior the resourceful and clever Miss Adler is to her 'superior':"superior":



* LivingEmotionalCrutch: Watson to Holmes, according to some interpretations.



* LondonTown: 221B Baker Street did not exist at the time (the house numbers only went up to 100 there). Later 221 would be assigned to the Abbey National Building Society (who had to hire a full-time clerk specifically to deal with Sherlock-related fanmail), which has now vacated that office. 221B is allocated to the museum, located between 237 and 241 Baker Street.

to:

* LondonTown: 221B Baker Street did not exist at the time (the house numbers only went up to 100 there). Later 221 would be assigned to the Abbey National Building Society (who had to hire a full-time clerk specifically to deal with Sherlock-related fanmail), which has now vacated that office. 221B is now allocated to the museum, located between 237 and 241 Baker Street.



* MandatoryUnretirement: In "His Last Bow", Holmes, who had retired to the country to raise bees, is revealed to have come out of retirement at the behest of the Prime Minister to catch a German spy. (Doyle wrote one more short story collection later, but in universe, "His Last Bow", set in 1914, is the last Sherlock Holmes story.)

to:

* MandatoryUnretirement: In "His Last Bow", Holmes, who had retired to the country to raise bees, is revealed to have come out of retirement at the behest of the Prime Minister to catch a German spy. (Doyle wrote one more short story collection later, but in universe, "His Last Bow", set in 1914, is the last Sherlock Holmes story.story chronologically.)



* MasterOfDisguise: Holmes often disguised himself for his investigations, and in most instances not even Watson recognized him. Notably, Watson can't see through Holmes's disguise when he first returns to London after pretending to be dead. Watson faints when Holmes takes off his disguise.

to:

* MasterOfDisguise: Holmes often disguised disguises himself for his investigations, and in most instances not even Watson recognized recognizes him. Notably, Watson can't see through Holmes's disguise when he first returns to London after pretending to be dead. Watson faints when Holmes takes off his disguise.



** "The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger" opens with a veiled threat to whomever has been attempting to steal Watson's papers that if the attempts continue, he'll publicise the full details regarding "the politician, the lighthouse and the trained cormorant".

to:

** "The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger" opens with a veiled threat to whomever has been attempting to steal Watson's papers that if the attempts continue, he'll publicise the full details regarding "the politician, the lighthouse and the trained cormorant".



** Gilbert Adair, in the somewhat bizarre finale 'And then there was no one' to his trilogy of murder mystery pastiches, actually gives the full story of 'The Giant Rat of Sumatra'. And it's surprisingly Doyle-like.



-->''(Holmes speaking)'' "You're not hurt, Watson? For God's sake, say that you are not hurt!"\\
It was worth a wound--it was worth many wounds--to know the depth of loyalty and love which lay behind that cold mask. The clear, hard eyes were dimmed for a moment, and the firm lips were shaking. For the one and only time I caught a glimpse of a great heart as well as of a great brain. All my years of humble but single-minded service culminated in that moment of revelation.
** [[TranquilFury "By the Lord, it is well for you. If you had killed Watson, you would not have gotten out of this room alive."]]
** There are a few minor examples of Holmes' unshockable demeanour being cracked by a sufficiently out-of-the-blue revelation: "The Adventure if the Noble Bachelor," when Watson reads that the bride went missing; "The Second Stain," when Watson tells him he won't be able to talk to one of his suspects, because he's dead; and "The Man with the Twisted Lip," when the wife of a man thought to be dead announces she's had a letter from him.

to:

-->''(Holmes speaking)'' "You're not hurt, Watson? For God's sake, say that you are not hurt!"\\
It was worth a wound--it was worth many wounds--to know the depth of loyalty and love which lay behind that cold mask. The clear, hard eyes were dimmed for a moment, and the firm lips were shaking. For the one and only time I caught a glimpse of a great heart as well as of a great brain. All my years of humble but single-minded service culminated in that moment of revelation.
** [[TranquilFury "By the Lord, it is well for you. If you had killed Watson, you would not have gotten out of this room alive."]]
** There are a few minor examples of Holmes' unshockable demeanour being cracked by a sufficiently out-of-the-blue revelation: "The Adventure if the Noble Bachelor," when Watson reads that the bride went missing; "The Second Stain," when Watson tells him he won't be able to talk to one of his suspects, because he's dead; and "The Man with the Twisted Lip," when the wife of a man thought to be dead announces she's just had a letter from him.
4th Feb '17 3:31:37 PM SwampAdder
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* FakingTheDead: "The Man with the Twisted Lip," and {{Retcon}}ned in for ''The Return of Sherlock Holmes.''

to:

* FakingTheDead: "The Man with the Twisted Lip," Lip", "The Norwood Builder", and {{Retcon}}ned in for ''The Return of Sherlock Holmes.''



* GeniusSlob: Holmes could very well be the TropeCodifier. While always ''personally'' well-kept, Holmes's concept of organisation amounted to keeping his tobacco in the toe of his Persian slipper, his cigars in the coal-scuttle, and his unanswered letters jack-knifed to the mantelpiece, all the while conducting foul-smelling chemical experiments in his study, and even using his walls for target practice.

to:

* GeniusSlob: Holmes could very well be the TropeCodifier. While always ''personally'' well-kept, Holmes's concept of organisation amounted to keeping his tobacco in the toe of his Persian slipper, his cigars in the coal-scuttle, and his unanswered letters jack-knifed to the mantelpiece, all the while conducting foul-smelling chemical experiments in his study, and even using his sitting-room walls for target practice.



-->"Upon my word, Watson! I owe you both my thanks and an apology. It was an unjustifiable experiment even for one’s self, and doubly so for a friend. I am really very sorry. [...] It would be superfluous to drive us mad, my dear Watson. A candid observer would [[WhatWereYouThinking certainly declare that we were so already]] before we embarked upon so wild an experiment."

to:

-->"Upon my word, Watson! I owe you both my thanks and an apology. It was an unjustifiable experiment even for one’s self, and doubly so for a friend. I am really very sorry. [...] It -->"It would be superfluous to drive us mad, my dear Watson. A candid observer would [[WhatWereYouThinking certainly declare that we were so already]] before we embarked upon so wild an experiment."
This list shows the last 10 events of 372. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.SherlockHolmes