History Literature / SherlockHolmes

11th Sep '17 10:34:56 PM benda
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** " The Five Orange Pips": [[spoiler:Captain John Calhoun]]

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** " The Five Orange Pips": [[spoiler:Captain John James Calhoun]]
10th Sep '17 7:33:33 PM ZarbiNerada
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* LeeroyJenkins: In "The ''Gloria Scott'', Hudson surmises that the first mate didn't set off the gunpowder that wrecked the ship, but one of hte mutineers with bad aim.

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* LeeroyJenkins: In "The ''Gloria Scott'', Scott''", Hudson surmises was fairly certain that the first mate didn't set off the gunpowder that wrecked the ship, but one of hte the mutineers with bad aim.
10th Sep '17 7:32:33 PM ZarbiNerada
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* LeeroyJenkins: In "The ''Gloria Scott'', Hudson surmises that the first mate didn't set off the gunpowder that wrecked the ship, but one of hte mutineers with bad aim.
2nd Sep '17 11:01:41 AM Omeganian
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* InsideJob: In "Silver Blaze", two of Holmes' hints are "the curious incident of the dog in the night-time" ([[AbsenceOfEvidence it was completely silent]]) and the fact that powdered opium was put in a dish spicy enough to hide its taste. A dog would not have kept silent had it sensed an intruder, nor could an outsider have arranged for a spicy dish to be served on that particular night, so the trope must be in effect.
30th Jul '17 10:30:15 AM EdwardGil
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* BeamMeUpScotty: "Elementary My Dear Watson" was never said in that order the original books. Homes would says "Elementary" or say "My Dear Watson", but never together. Its use was first made in William Gillette's plays.
8th Jul '17 10:08:43 AM nombretomado
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* AmbiguousDisorder: Holmes is perhaps the most well known example of this trope, and it could even be considered a staple of the character. He has a knowledge of crime that would put TheOtherWiki to shame, and yet is unaware that the earth revolves around the sun, believes that the human memory can only hold a certain amount of information until it's full (though it seems that he later rejects this belief), suffers from "periods of lethargy", and is a casual cocaine user.

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* AmbiguousDisorder: Holmes is perhaps the most well known example of this trope, and it could even be considered a staple of the character. He has a knowledge of crime that would put TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki to shame, and yet is unaware that the earth revolves around the sun, believes that the human memory can only hold a certain amount of information until it's full (though it seems that he later rejects this belief), suffers from "periods of lethargy", and is a casual cocaine user.
8th Jul '17 6:29:07 AM DoctorNemesis
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* LetsSeeYouDoBetter: combined with an {{invoked}} does of SurpriseDifficulty for Holmes at the beginning of "The Blanched Soldier", one of the few stories in the canon narrated from the perspective of Holmes himself. After challenged by Watson to try it himself after one-too-many derisive comments and dismissive put-downs about Watson's writing, Holmes is forced to concede that turning one of his investigations into a narrative that people actually want to read is a lot harder than he gave Watson credit for.

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* LetsSeeYouDoBetter: combined with an {{invoked}} does dose of SurpriseDifficulty for Holmes at the beginning of "The Blanched Soldier", one of the few stories in the canon narrated from the perspective of Holmes himself. After challenged by Watson to try it himself after one-too-many derisive comments and dismissive put-downs about Watson's writing, Holmes is forced to concede that turning one of his investigations into a narrative that people actually want to read is a lot harder than he gave Watson credit for.
8th Jul '17 6:18:45 AM DoctorNemesis
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Added DiffLines:

* LetsSeeYouDoBetter: combined with an {{invoked}} does of SurpriseDifficulty for Holmes at the beginning of "The Blanched Soldier", one of the few stories in the canon narrated from the perspective of Holmes himself. After challenged by Watson to try it himself after one-too-many derisive comments and dismissive put-downs about Watson's writing, Holmes is forced to concede that turning one of his investigations into a narrative that people actually want to read is a lot harder than he gave Watson credit for.
8th Jul '17 3:33:59 AM DoctorNemesis
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* FauxAffablyEvil: Baron Gruner of "The Illustrious Client", whose manner is described as "most affable... a superficial suggestion of afternoon tea with all the cruelty of the grave behind it." Holmes clarifies that Gruner's affability is that of "a purring cat who thinks he sees prospective mice."

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* FauxAffablyEvil: FauxAffablyEvil:
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Baron Gruner of "The Illustrious Client", whose manner is described as "most affable... a superficial suggestion of afternoon tea with all the cruelty of the grave behind it." Holmes clarifies that Gruner's affability is that of "a purring cat who thinks he sees prospective mice.""
** Wilson Kemp in "The Greek Interpreter" has a nervous giggle that is presumably an attempt to put the person he's speaking to at ease but instead just makes him seem even slimier, creepier and more threatening. His confederate Harold Latimer is also constantly making barely-veiled threats in a softly-spoken, seemingly polite manner.
29th Jun '17 7:10:58 PM PaulA
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* TilMurderDoUsPart: In "The Retired Colourman", the title character's wife has disappeared and is thought to have run away with her lover; Holmes proves that he murdered her (and the supposed lover).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.SherlockHolmes