History Literature / OneHundredYearsOfSolitude

16th Feb '17 5:53:48 PM malias
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** Also, Mauricio Babilonia. Fernanda was surprised when he saw him for the first and only time and looked into his deep BrownEyes...and then she kicked him out of the Buendía house.

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** Also, Mauricio Babilonia. Fernanda was surprised when he saw him for the first and only time and looked into his deep BrownEyes...brown eyes...and then she kicked him out of the Buendía house.
4th Nov '16 4:46:23 AM 06tele
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* MundaneMadeAwesome: Coupled with UnusuallyUninterestingSight. Nobody in the town is especially surprised when Remedios the Beauty ascends into heaven, because, of course she does. But when the railway comes to Macondo they think it's a huge iron monster.
4th Sep '16 1:18:24 PM mrincodi
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* SolarPoweredMagnifyingGlass: The gypsies put a pile of dry hay in the middle of the street and set it on fire with a gigantic magnifying glass. This makes José Arcadio Buendía think that it can be used as as a weapon of war.
26th Aug '16 7:11:30 AM Morgenthaler
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''One Hundred Years of Solitude'' is a 1967 novel, that won GabrielGarciaMarquez the Nobel Prize for Literature. It's become a staple of Spanish-speaking high school curricula everywhere, mostly for being [[MindScrew awesomely deep and so goddamn hard to understand]]. Arguably one of the most important pieces of literature written in the 20th century, or to put in context, almost as important as ''Literature/DonQuixote'' to Spanish speaking literature. Famous, among other things, for using every conceivable trope one could ever hope to fit in 28.8 oz of paper.

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''One Hundred Years of Solitude'' is a 1967 novel, that won GabrielGarciaMarquez Creator/GabrielGarciaMarquez the Nobel Prize for Literature. It's become a staple of Spanish-speaking high school curricula everywhere, mostly for being [[MindScrew awesomely deep and so goddamn hard to understand]]. Arguably one of the most important pieces of literature written in the 20th century, or to put in context, almost as important as ''Literature/DonQuixote'' to Spanish speaking literature. Famous, among other things, for using every conceivable trope one could ever hope to fit in 28.8 oz of paper.
22nd Apr '16 2:35:02 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* HeyItsThatGuy: InUniverse. When a cinema is installed in Macondo, one of the films shown has an actor's character dying, and the townspeople cry for him. When the next film has the same actor playing a Muslim character, there is a riot, because the people did not realize that the films are fiction and consider this change a blasphemy.
5th Apr '16 2:42:59 PM Tromboneman
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* BigScrewedUpFamily

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* BigScrewedUpFamilyBigScrewedUpFamily The book
5th Apr '16 2:22:48 PM Tromboneman
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* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: The book comes with an invaluable family tree. Everyone born into or marrying into the family has ADayInTheLimelight. Some characters get more love than others, but I can't think of a single character than can be considered the protagonist of the story.

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* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: The English version of the book comes with an invaluable family tree. Everyone born into or marrying into the family has ADayInTheLimelight. Some characters get more love than others, but I can't think of a single character than can be considered the protagonist of the story.
20th Mar '16 2:02:32 AM Theriocephalus
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* LonersAreFreaks: Most characters are loners in their own way, and freaky in their own way. The ones that are more obviously loners, such as the {{Hikikomoris}}, are also more obviously freaky (José Arcadio Buendía, Colonel Aureliano Buendía, etc.)

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* LonersAreFreaks: Most characters are loners in their own way, and freaky in their own way. The ones that are more obviously loners, such as the {{Hikikomoris}}, {{Hikikomori}}s, are also more obviously freaky (José Arcadio Buendía, Colonel Aureliano Buendía, etc.)



* RapeIsLove: [[spoiler:When Aureliano Babilonia rapes Amaranta Úrsula.]] This is also how Pilar Ternera lost her virginity, and why her family made her join the caravan that founded Macondo in the first place.
8th Nov '15 8:22:22 AM HoursGoneBy
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''One Hundred Years of Solitude'' is a 1967 novel, that won GabrielGarciaMarquez the Nobel Prize for Literature. Staple of Spanish-speaking High School curricula everywhere, mostly for being [[MindScrew awesomely deep and so goddamn hard to understand]]. Arguably one of the most important pieces of literature written in the 20th century, or to put in context, almost as important as ''Literature/DonQuixote'' to Spanish speaking literature. Famous among other things for using every conceivable trope one could ever hope to fit in 28.8 oz of paper.

to:

''One Hundred Years of Solitude'' is a 1967 novel, that won GabrielGarciaMarquez the Nobel Prize for Literature. Staple It's become a staple of Spanish-speaking High School high school curricula everywhere, mostly for being [[MindScrew awesomely deep and so goddamn hard to understand]]. Arguably one of the most important pieces of literature written in the 20th century, or to put in context, almost as important as ''Literature/DonQuixote'' to Spanish speaking literature. Famous Famous, among other things things, for using every conceivable trope one could ever hope to fit in 28.8 oz of paper.
25th Aug '15 11:26:15 AM Jo13
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* ExplosiveBreeder: All of Aureliano Segundo and Petra Cotes' animals [[spoiler:(only ''before'' the five-year-long rain, that is).]]


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* SomeoneToRememberHimBy: [[spoiler:Santa Sofía de la Piedad gives birth to twins José Arcadio Segundo and Aureliano Segundo five months after Arcadio's execution via firing squad.]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.OneHundredYearsOfSolitude