History Literature / MurderOnTheOrientExpress

21st Jan '17 10:19:24 AM yisfidri
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* AdaptationalAngstUpgrade: In the original novel and most adaptations, Poirot rather cavalierly lets the murderers go free, but in the 1974 film and ''especially'' the 2010 ''Series/{{Poirot}}'' versions, [[spoiler: he is deeply conflicted before finally making the choice.]]

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* AdaptationalAngstUpgrade: In the original novel and most adaptations, novel, Poirot rather cavalierly lets the murderers go free, but in the 1974 film and ''especially'' the 2010 ''Series/{{Poirot}}'' versions, film, [[spoiler: he is deeply conflicted before finally making the choice.]]



* AndIMustScream: [[spoiler: In the 2010 version, Franco Cassetti was drugged into immobility, and was conscious through every ''single'' stab, but unable to move. [[AssholeVictim He deserved every minute of it.]]]]



* AwfulTruth: Poirot in the 1974 and 2010 adaptations.



* DarkerAndEdgier: The 2010 adaptation, in spades.



** The trope plays pretty much straight too. The only characters who are not suspects are Poirot himself, who was hearing some of the key events of the murder taking place and was asleep through others; and M. Bouc (Signor Bianchi in the 1974 film) and Dr. Constantine, who were incapable of being in the place of the murder at the time of the murder. [[spoiler:In the 2010 adaptation, even the latter is one of the killers.]]
* EvilIsDeathlyCold: In the 2010 adaptation, the train's generator fails soon after it runs into the snowdrift, so everything gets progressively colder and darker as Poirot comes closer to the truth. In the novel, the victim's compartment was cold because the window was left open.

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** The trope plays pretty much straight too. The only characters who are not suspects are Poirot himself, who was hearing some of the key events of the murder taking place and was asleep through others; and M. Bouc (Signor Bianchi in the 1974 film) and Dr. Constantine, who were incapable of being in the place of the murder at the time of the murder. [[spoiler:In the 2010 adaptation, even the latter is one of the killers.]]
* EvilIsDeathlyCold: In the 2010 adaptation, the train's generator fails soon after it runs into the snowdrift, so everything gets progressively colder and darker as Poirot comes closer to the truth. In the novel, the victim's compartment was cold because the window was left open.



** Film adaptations are notoriously guilty of this. The 1974 adaptation featured a French steam locomotive (on a train snowbound in Yugoslavia) and a Pullman lounge car, which the real Orient Express never featured. Similarly, the 2010 adaptation was filmed in the UK with a series of Wagon-Lits Pullman lounge cars and a British steam locomotive.

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** Film adaptations are notoriously guilty of this. The 1974 adaptation featured a French steam locomotive (on a train snowbound in Yugoslavia) and a Pullman lounge car, which the real Orient Express never featured. Similarly, the 2010 adaptation was filmed in the UK with a series of Wagon-Lits Pullman lounge cars and a British steam locomotive.



* PapaWolf: [[spoiler: One of the murderers was the conductor Pierre Michel, the father of the Armstrong family maid who hanged herself (in the 2010 adaptation; the novel says she killed herself by jumping off the window and falling to her death) after being accused of the crime.]]

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* PapaWolf: [[spoiler: One of the murderers was the conductor Pierre Michel, the father of the Armstrong family maid who hanged herself (in the 2010 adaptation; the novel says she killed herself committed suicide by jumping off out of the window and falling to her death) after being accused of the crime.]]



* SherlockScan: An odd example - Poirot is somehow able to intuit that a suspect previously worked as a cook thanks to his "nose for fine dining." In the 2010 adaptation, the clue is instead that he overheard them giving detailed instructions to the waiter when ordering dinner.

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* SherlockScan: An odd example - Poirot is somehow able to intuit that a suspect previously worked as a cook thanks to his "nose for fine dining." In the 2010 adaptation, the clue is instead that he overheard them giving detailed instructions to the waiter when ordering dinner.



* VillainousBreakdown: In the 2010 adaptation, Cassetti/[[spoiler:Ratchett]] becomes increasingly unhinged as he realizes the people looking for retribution are on the train and starts praying to God for forgiveness.
* WhatYouAreInTheDark: In the 2010 adaptations, when Poirot discovers that [[spoiler: all his fellow passengers were the killers]], he initially plans to turn them into the Yugoslavian police, regardless of how monstrous the victim was. Problem is, he and the train manager are the only witnesses and they are stuck in the middle of nowhere. Arbuthnot actually draws his gun on Poirot, until [[HeWhoFightsMonsters the rest of them realize that would make them like Cassetti]]. [[spoiler: He lets them go anyways, but at the cost of his faith in God, as he tries in vain to hold onto his Catholic rosary as he walks away.]]
** In the 1974 film, he has a similar crisis of faith, and even though the suspects are willing to accept the consequences of their actions - the man was dead, they didn't care about their fate afterward. Poirot decides to go with the simpler, false explanation, but is visibly shaken.
--->'''Bianchi:''' Hercule. I thank you.
--->'''Poirot:''' My friend. Now I must go and wrestle with my report to the police and with my conscience.

to:

* VillainousBreakdown: In the 2010 adaptation, Cassetti/[[spoiler:Ratchett]] becomes increasingly unhinged as he realizes the people looking for retribution are on the train and starts praying to God for forgiveness.
* WhatYouAreInTheDark: In the 2010 adaptations, 1974 film, when Poirot discovers that [[spoiler: all [[spoiler:all his fellow passengers were the killers]], he initially plans to turn them into the Yugoslavian police, regardless of how monstrous the victim was. Problem is, he and the train manager are the only witnesses and they are stuck in the middle of nowhere. Arbuthnot actually draws his gun on Poirot, until [[HeWhoFightsMonsters the rest of them realize that would make them like Cassetti]]. [[spoiler: He lets them go anyways, but at the cost of his faith in God, as he tries in vain to hold onto his Catholic rosary as he walks away.]]
** In the 1974 film,
killers, he has a similar crisis of faith, and even though the suspects are willing to accept the consequences of their actions - the man was dead, they didn't care about their fate afterward. Poirot decides to go with the simpler, false explanation, explanation and let them all go free, but is visibly shaken.
--->'''Bianchi:'''
shaken.]]
-->'''Bianchi:'''
Hercule. I thank you.
--->'''Poirot:''' -->'''Poirot:''' My friend. Now I must go and wrestle with my report to the police and with my conscience.
10th Dec '16 6:25:28 AM benda
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* HeroicSacrifice: [[spoiler:Though all the passengers played a part in the murder (such that no-one knows who really struck the killing blow), Linda asks Poirot to just punish her and let the others go free, though it means she must suffer alone.]]

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* HeroicSacrifice: [[spoiler:Though all the passengers played a part in the murder (such that no-one knows who really struck the killing blow), Linda asks Poirot to just punish her and let the others go free, though it means she must suffer alone. He just lets everybody get off scot-free instead.]]
23rd Oct '16 12:19:22 PM danlansdowne
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Added DiffLines:

** The 2001 version didn't even bother using Wagon-Lits carriages, instead using a train of British Pullman lounge cars. Ironically, one of them, named "Ibis", was used as a dining car on the Simplon-Orient-Express (the Orient Express Poirot travels on) between Paris and Venice for a couple of years in the 20s.
7th Aug '16 2:04:06 AM davah301
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Added DiffLines:

* DistinguishedGentlemansPipe: Colonel Arbuthnot smokes a pipe.
29th Jul '16 8:23:33 PM illbeback312
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* RedHerring: Literally referred to by Poirot during TheReveal : he points out that the mafia member and the red kimono were just "red herrings to confuse and deceive him", and even describes the night of the murder as the "night of the red herrings". See OrgyOfEvidence.

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* RedHerring: Literally referred to by Poirot during TheReveal : he He points out that the mafia Mafia member and the red kimono were just "red herrings to confuse and deceive him", and even describes the night of the murder as the "night of the red herrings". See OrgyOfEvidence.
29th Jul '16 8:21:58 PM illbeback312
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* EverybodyDidIt: Former {{Trope Namer|s}}.

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* EverybodyDidIt: [[spoiler:EverybodyDidIt: Former {{Trope Namer|s}}.]]



* EveryoneIsASuspect: Deconstructed. Many murder mysteries set up the plot so that every character had a motive; but why would someone be in a situation where everyone in the vicinity has a motive to kill them? If the whole situation is the result of a conspiracy plotted by all the people with a motive to bring the victim among them.

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* EveryoneIsASuspect: Deconstructed. Many [[spoiler:Many murder mysteries set up the plot so that every character had a motive; but why would someone be in a situation where everyone in the vicinity has a motive to kill them? If the whole situation is the result of a conspiracy plotted by all the people with a motive to bring the victim among them.]]



* PayEvilUntoEvil: The victim had been guilty of the kidnapping and murder of a small child years before. Poirot finds the man is so deserving of his murder that he decides ''not'' to turn the murderer over to the police, and even offers them a theory of how the murderer escaped the train that is as plausible as it is false.

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* PayEvilUntoEvil: The victim had been guilty of the kidnapping and murder of a small child years before. Poirot [[spoiler:Poirot finds the man is so deserving of his murder that he decides ''not'' to turn the murderer over to the police, and even offers them a theory of how the murderer escaped the train that is as plausible as it is false.]]
19th Jul '16 10:20:38 AM redandready45
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Added DiffLines:

* UnusualEuphemism: In the 1974 movie, when asking Poirot for help, Poirot asks Ratchet what business he was involved with.
--> '''Ratchet''': Baby food.
12th Jul '16 6:39:04 PM Argon2
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* GorgeousPeriodDress: One of the trademarks of Christie film adaptations

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* GorgeousPeriodDress: One of the trademarks of Christie film adaptationsadaptations.
* HeroicSacrifice: [[spoiler:Though all the passengers played a part in the murder (such that no-one knows who really struck the killing blow), Linda asks Poirot to just punish her and let the others go free, though it means she must suffer alone.]]


Added DiffLines:

* ToBeLawfulOrGood: The story's dramatic crux. [[spoiler:Was it right for the twelve to kill a clearly guilty murderer, given that he'd already bribed society's court system to ignore his crimes? Eventually, Poirot chooses Good.]]
4th Jul '16 8:40:59 PM Adept
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* TheBadGuyWins: [[ZigZaggingTrope Averted, subverted, played straight]]... It depends on your definitions of "bad guy" and "win".

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* TheBadGuyWins: [[ZigZaggingTrope Averted, subverted, played straight]]...Zigzagged. It depends on your definitions of "bad guy" and "win".
20th May '16 8:15:29 AM Cyanna
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* SeamlessSpontaneousLie: [[spoiler: Everyone on the train was a part of the murder. They had to make up several lies to throw Poirot off their trail. This was something like a dozen people. That kept up a lie under the scrutiny of Poirot. On a snowbound train in the middle of nowhere.
** Though not so much spontaneous, as they intentionally planned their stories so that pretty much everyone had an alibi with someone who would have no reason to lie about it (who would suspect Arbuthnot and Macqueen to be in it together, or Mrs. Hubbard and Greta, or Foscarelli and Masterman). And the stories ''do'' have flaws, just not immediately obvious ones. ]]

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* SeamlessSpontaneousLie: [[spoiler: Everyone on the train was a part of the murder. They had to make up several lies to throw Poirot off their trail. This was something like a dozen people. That kept up a lie under the scrutiny of Poirot. On a snowbound train in the middle of nowhere.
nowhere.]]
** [[spoiler: Though not so much spontaneous, as they intentionally planned their stories so that pretty much everyone had an alibi with someone who would have no reason to lie about it (who would suspect Arbuthnot and Macqueen to be in it together, or Mrs. Hubbard and Greta, or Foscarelli and Masterman). And the stories ''do'' have flaws, just not immediately obvious ones. ]]
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