History Literature / MansfieldPark

12th Feb '17 12:44:06 PM morenohijazo
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* TheWickedStage: Fanny's disapproval of private theatricals is a mark of her character.
31st Oct '16 8:17:21 PM LadyNorbert
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The Bertrams' eldest son Tom is harmless, aside from driving the family deeper into debt every day. Their daughters, Maria and Julia, look down on Fanny but mostly ignore her. Her only friend is their second son Edmund, six years her senior, who is always there to comfort and defend his cousin and do his best to make her happy. So it's a small wonder that 18-year-old Fanny eventually realizes she's fallen in love with him (no taboo against KissingCousins in this context, remember?).

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The Bertrams' eldest son Tom is harmless, aside from driving the family deeper into debt every day. Their daughters, Maria and Julia, look down on Fanny but mostly ignore her. Her only friend is their second son Edmund, six years her senior, who is always there to comfort and defend his cousin and do his best to make her happy. So it's a small wonder that 18-year-old Fanny eventually realizes she's fallen in love with him (no (remember, there was no taboo against KissingCousins in this context, remember?).
context).



* AccompliceByInaction: Edmund, despite being a NiceGuy, stands up to Fanny only when his fling Mary Crawford is not concerned. Mary herself is a more clear-cut example, since her answer to her brother's tentative of attracting Fanny's affection to leave her sighing and depressed like her cousins is basically a cross between ThatMakesMeFeelAngry and "whatever, anyway I told you so and it's not my business."
* AllGirlsWantBadBoys: Maria and Julia both fall too hard for Henry Crawford to hate him for manipulating them both and instead just become jealous of each other. Fanny Price Snr. seems to have fallen prey to this when she married Lt Price, which could be why Fanny doesn't want to repeat the mistake with Crawford, even if the financial difficulties don't apply.

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* AccompliceByInaction: Edmund, despite being a NiceGuy, stands up to for Fanny only when his fling Mary Crawford is not concerned. Mary herself is a more clear-cut example, since her answer to her brother's tentative efforts of attracting Fanny's affection to leave her sighing and depressed like her cousins is basically a cross between ThatMakesMeFeelAngry and "whatever, anyway I told you so and it's not my business."
* AllGirlsWantBadBoys: Maria and Julia both fall too hard for Henry Crawford to hate him for manipulating them both and instead just become jealous of each other. Fanny Price Snr. seems to have fallen prey to this when she married Lt Lt. Price, which could be why Fanny doesn't want to repeat the mistake with Crawford, even if the financial difficulties don't apply.



* AllLovingHero: Fanny consistently cares and worries about everyone's wellbeing, no matter if they have been horrible towards her or not. Despite how she feels about Edmund, she constantly does whatever she can to help both him and Mary Crawford, even if it leads to her own unhappiness, and she even feels bad about being afraid of Sir Thomas. In fact, when the play is being rehearsed and Julia is excluded, Fanny is the only one who worries about her at all, ''constantly'' concerned for her, and the only reason why she doesn't go to help her is because she thinks that she would be presuming too much importance in her own actions. Of course, the fact that everyone has become so adjusted to her acting this way is why it is such a huge shock when she [[spoiler: rejects Henry's proposal]] - it turns out that Fanny is actually quite capable of holding negative opinions of people, even if she doesn't show them.

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* AllLovingHero: Fanny consistently cares and worries about everyone's wellbeing, no matter well-being, even if they have been horrible towards her or not.to her. Despite how she feels about Edmund, she constantly does whatever she can to help both him and Mary Crawford, even if it leads to her own unhappiness, and she even feels bad about being afraid of Sir Thomas. In fact, when the play is being rehearsed and Julia is excluded, Fanny is the only one who worries about her at all, ''constantly'' concerned for her, and the only reason why she doesn't go to help her is because she thinks that she would be presuming too much importance in her own actions. Of course, the fact that everyone has become so adjusted used to her acting this way is why it is such a huge shock when she [[spoiler: rejects Henry's proposal]] - it turns out that Fanny is actually quite capable of holding negative opinions of people, even if she doesn't show them.



** Mary Crawford. From self-centred and [[DracoInLeatherPants elegant]] AntiVillain, GoldDigger for Edmund TrueCompanions with Fanny and SpiritedYoungLady to StupidEvil with a VillainousCrush and a FalseFriend.
** Tom Bertram goes from a [[ItsAllAboutMe self-involved]] irresponsible party animal to a resposible big brother with a GuiltComplex.

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** Mary Crawford. From self-centred self-centered and [[DracoInLeatherPants elegant]] AntiVillain, GoldDigger for Edmund TrueCompanions with Fanny and SpiritedYoungLady to StupidEvil with a VillainousCrush and a FalseFriend.
** Tom Bertram goes from a [[ItsAllAboutMe self-involved]] irresponsible party animal to a resposible responsible big brother with a GuiltComplex.



** Edmund (Archie), Fanny (Betty), Mary Crawford (Veronica);
** Or ''Fanny'' is the Veronica. Yes, you read this well. She refuses to advantage her family with a marriage of convenience, throws a proto-feminist speech to the head of her love interest, and is perfectly sure that she can be right over men. Mary complies to most of society's standards, and ends up thinking of compromising herself and wangsting a lot. This can be argued to be a case of BettyAndVeronicaSwitch, as they weren't like this at the beginning of the novel.
** Fanny (Archie), Edmund (Betty), Henry Crawford (Veronica);
** Henry (Archie), Fanny (Betty) and Maria Bertram (Veronica);
** Maria (Archie), Mr. Rushworth (Betty), Henry (Veronica).
* BookDumb: Fanny, when she first arrives at Mansfield Park, she knows very little about the arts or humanities. All she knows about are dumb things like how to help keep a house, how to look after babies, how to manage and educate younger kids, &c... Sadly for her, her two cousins (and the governess) are exactly the opposite. They're terribly accomplished, but so Life Dumb they don't know the difference between 'uneducated' and 'stupid', and, despite not being naturally mean, are spectacularly emotionally illiterate. Fanny makes up for lost time later, at least in theology and philosophy, with Edmund's help; but, because their confidence was built up too high, Maria and Julia never gain any wisdom until it's far too late.

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** Edmund (Archie), Fanny (Betty), Mary Crawford (Veronica);
**
(Veronica)
***
Or ''Fanny'' is the Veronica. Yes, you read this well.right. She refuses to advantage her family with a marriage of convenience, throws a proto-feminist speech to the head of her love interest, and is perfectly sure that she can be right over men. Mary complies to most of society's standards, and ends up thinking of compromising herself and wangsting a lot. This can be argued to be a case of BettyAndVeronicaSwitch, as they weren't like this at the beginning of the novel.
** Fanny (Archie), Edmund (Betty), Henry Crawford (Veronica);
(Veronica)
** Henry (Archie), Fanny (Betty) and Maria Bertram (Veronica);
(Veronica)
** Maria (Archie), Mr. Rushworth (Betty), Henry (Veronica).
(Veronica)
* BookDumb: Fanny, when she first arrives at Mansfield Park, she knows very little about the arts or humanities. All she knows about are dumb "dumb" things like how to help keep a house, how to look after babies, how to manage and educate younger kids, &c... Sadly for her, her two cousins (and the governess) are exactly the opposite. They're terribly accomplished, but so Life Dumb they don't know the difference between 'uneducated' and 'stupid', and, despite not being naturally mean, are spectacularly emotionally illiterate. Fanny makes up for lost time later, at least in theology and philosophy, with Edmund's help; but, because their confidence was built up too high, Maria and Julia never gain any wisdom until it's far too late.



* CharacterDevelopment: Fanny starts to stand up for herself and take the initiative (such as when she helps her sister Susan with her problem with Betsy), Edmund's eyes are opened to the real Mary Crawford, and Sir Thomas experiences the typical Creator/JaneAusten Rude-Awakening-and-Painful-Disillusionment.

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* CharacterDevelopment: Fanny starts to stand up for herself and take the initiative (such as when she helps her sister Susan with her problem with Betsy), Betsey), Edmund's eyes are opened to the real Mary Crawford, and Sir Thomas experiences the typical Creator/JaneAusten Rude-Awakening-and-Painful-Disillusionment.



* ClusterFBomb: Mr. Price's constant use of the phrase "By God!" is treated like this thanks to the period it was written in. (It's studiously rendered as "By G--" in the text.) Fanny is very embarrassed by this.
* CreatorsApathy: [[invoked]] The cast of ''Lover's Vows'', with the exception of Mr. Yates, is concerned with the flirtations and betrayals which occur under cover of "rehearsals," rather than any serious attempt to produce the play.
* DancesAndBalls: Many of them. Maria and Julia frequent assembly balls and Mrs. Norris chaperones them, and Maria and Mr. Rushworth meet at one of them and they continue their courtship phase there as well. One impromptu small ball happens on Mansfield, and finally, Sir Thomas organizes a splendid ball in Fanny's honour - as her introduction into society, to please her and her brother and perhaps even to help Mr. Crawford to court Fanny.
* DarkerAndEdgier: Was supposed to be this to ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice''. Was also supposed to be not about marriage at all, but ordination; that was the intention, anyway.
* DerailingLoveInterests: Edmund is generally a better person than Henry Crawford throughout the novel, but when Henry [[spoiler: runs off with Maria]], this seems substantially worse than anything we've seen from him so far. Some readers see it as Austen's attempt to justify Fanny's decision, while others see consistent moral development of character. A lot of scholars see his escape with Maria Bertram in the Rushworths's garden as a premise of elopement, or a sexual intercourse. It symbolizes, at least, his willingness to ''almost'' help cheating on Maria's fiance.
* DidYouThinkICannotFeel: Fanny after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and that marrying him would be a terrible idea.

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* ClusterFBomb: Mr. Price's constant use of the phrase "By God!" is treated like this thanks this, due to the period in which it was written in.written. (It's studiously rendered as "By G--" in the text.) Fanny is very embarrassed by this.
* CreatorsApathy: [[invoked]] The cast of ''Lover's Vows'', with the exception of Mr. Yates, is more concerned with the flirtations and betrayals which occur under cover of "rehearsals," rather than with any serious attempt to produce the play.
* DancesAndBalls: Many of them. Maria and Julia frequent frequently attend assembly balls and Mrs. Norris chaperones them, and Maria and Mr. Rushworth meet at one of them and they continue their courtship phase there as well. One impromptu small ball happens on at Mansfield, and finally, Sir Thomas organizes a splendid ball in Fanny's honour - as her introduction into society, to please her and her brother and perhaps even to help Mr. Crawford to court Fanny.
* DarkerAndEdgier: Was The book supposed to be this to ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice''. Was It was also supposed to be not about marriage at all, but ordination; that was the intention, anyway.
* DerailingLoveInterests: Edmund is generally a better person than Henry Crawford throughout the novel, but when Henry [[spoiler: runs off with Maria]], this seems substantially worse than anything we've seen from him so far. Some readers see it as Austen's attempt to justify Fanny's decision, while others see consistent moral development of character. A lot of scholars see his escape with Maria Bertram in the Rushworths's garden as a premise of elopement, or a sexual intercourse. It symbolizes, at least, his willingness to ''almost'' help cheating Maria cheat on Maria's fiance.
her fiancé.
* DidYouThinkICannotFeel: Fanny Fanny, after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and that marrying him would be a terrible idea.



* EmotionlessGirl: Fanny as a survival mechanism. Compare Elinor in ''Literature/SenseAndSensibility'', Anne in ''Literature/{{Persuasion}}'', and Georgiana Darcy in ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice'' -- all mortifyingly shy, very affectionate to all, always trying to accommodate everyone's demands as much as they can, all looking up to an older kind male figure to whom they are related by blood (with said male having been their only friend for many years and having taught them all they know), and, to top it off, all having lonely childhoods with no friends of their own ages and used to using silence and emotionlessness to cope with difficult situations.

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* EmotionlessGirl: Fanny as a survival mechanism. Compare Elinor in ''Literature/SenseAndSensibility'', Anne in ''Literature/{{Persuasion}}'', and Georgiana Darcy in ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice'' -- all mortifyingly incredibly shy, very affectionate to all, those whom they love, always trying to accommodate everyone's demands as much as they can, all looking up to an older kind male figure to whom they are related by blood (with said male having been their only friend for many years and having taught them all they know), and, to top it off, all having lonely childhoods with no friends of their own ages and used to using silence and emotionlessness an emotionless facade to cope with difficult situations.



** Poor Fanny sure gets "knocked up" a lot, not to mention all the "intercourse" and Henry Crawford "making love" to her. Also, when Henry Crawford is discussing with his sister the possibility of seducing Fanny, one of his questions about her is "Is she queer?"

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** Poor Fanny sure gets "knocked up" a lot, not to mention all the "intercourse" and Henry Crawford "making love" to her. Also, when Henry Crawford is discussing with his sister the possibility of seducing Fanny, one of his questions about her is is, "Is she queer?"



** {{Lampshaded}} inversion in Mary's case -- see ItsAllAboutMe.
** Played straight in Fanny's case -- her objection to Edmund choosing Mary Crawford is less because she won't get him (though that's not nothing) and more because of who Mary is. When it gets closer to Edmund's anticipated proposal, Fanny's fretting is over the fact that ''Edmund'' would be unhappy when he discovers Mary's true character.

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** {{Lampshaded}} inversion in Mary's case -- - see ItsAllAboutMe.
** Played straight in Fanny's case -- case; her objection to Edmund choosing Mary Crawford is less because she won't get him herself (though that's not nothing) and more because of who Mary is. When it gets closer to Edmund's anticipated proposal, Fanny's fretting is over the fact that ''Edmund'' would be unhappy when he discovers Mary's true character.



** Edmund's blindness to Miss Crawford's true nature can no longer hold up when [[spoiler:Fanny tells him of the letter she received when his brother was ill, featuring a stealth hope that he would die and make Edmund the heir of Mansfield Park, and therefore rich enough for her]].

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** Edmund's blindness to Miss Crawford's true nature can no longer hold up when [[spoiler:Fanny tells him of the letter she received when his brother was ill, featuring a stealth hope that he Tom would die and make Edmund the heir of Mansfield Park, and therefore rich enough for her]].



* KissingCousins: Mrs. Norris worries about this when she first brings Fanny to Mansfield Park, although not because it was wrong to marry your cousin, but because she didn't want Tom or Edmund marrying "below their station." [[spoiler: It turns out her worries were well-founded, since Edmund and Fanny end up together.]]
* ALadyOnEachArm: Henry Crawford with Maria and Julia. Later, when he visits Portsmouth, he repeats it with Fanny and her sister Susan -- though in that case, Susan's presence [[ThirdWheel certainly wasn't his idea.]]

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* KissingCousins: Mrs. Norris worries about this when she first brings Fanny to Mansfield Park, although Park - not because it was wrong to marry your cousin, but because she didn't want Tom or Edmund marrying "below their station." [[spoiler: It turns out her worries were well-founded, since Edmund and Fanny end up together.]]
* ALadyOnEachArm: Henry Crawford with Maria and Julia. Later, when he visits Portsmouth, he repeats it with Fanny and her sister Susan -- though (though in that case, Susan's presence [[ThirdWheel certainly wasn't his idea.]] idea]]).



** Mrs. Norris has spent a lifetime bullying Fanny, making her feel useless while spoiling her nieces Maria and Julia rotten. [[spoiler:Come the end, she's moved in with a disgraced Maria to take care of her for the rest of her life and has to live with her mistakes.]]

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** Mrs. Norris has spent a lifetime bullying Fanny, making her feel useless while spoiling her other nieces Maria and Julia rotten. [[spoiler:Come the end, she's moved in with a disgraced Maria to take care of her for the rest of her life and has to live with her mistakes.]]



** The narrator states outright in the last few chapters that if Henry Crawford had not [[spoiler:felt the need to conquer Maria's affections again]], he would have ultimately won [[spoiler: Fanny's]] heart and hand.

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** The narrator states outright in the last few chapters that if Henry Crawford had not [[spoiler:felt the need to conquer Maria's affections again]], he would have ultimately won [[spoiler: Fanny's]] [[spoiler:won Fanny's heart and hand.hand]].



* NoAccountingForTaste: The Bertrams and the Rushworths--Sir Thomas' wife is lazy and unintelligent, and Mr. Rushworth is rather dim as well. Paradoxically, the Bertrams seem to be HappilyMarried at the same time.

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* NoAccountingForTaste: The Bertrams and the Rushworths--Sir Rushworths; Sir Thomas' wife is lazy and unintelligent, and Mr. Rushworth is rather dim as well. Paradoxically, the Bertrams seem to be HappilyMarried at the same time.time, as it's made clear in a few scenes that they really care about each other.



** In the Price household, we see that Mrs. Price values her sons over her daughters. Her eldest, William, is her favourite, yet luckily it didn't spoil him. Little Betsy is the only daughter that Mrs Price likes and she spoils her horribly. Poor Susan is TheUnfavourite for being a girl and not the youngest cutest child, and lashes out a lot as a result. Fanny helps her deal with it, and is eventually able to bring her back to Mansfield Park to get away from it.

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** In the Price household, we see that Mrs. Price values her sons over her daughters. Her eldest, William, is her favourite, yet luckily it didn't spoil him. Little Betsy Betsey is the only daughter that Mrs Price likes and she spoils her horribly. Poor Susan is TheUnfavourite for being a girl and but not the youngest cutest child, and lashes out a lot as a result. Fanny helps her deal with it, and is eventually able allowed to bring her back to Mansfield Park to get Park, which gets her away from it.it and makes her very happy.



** Fanny, as the eldest, had to help her mother out a lot before she was adopted.

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** Fanny, as the eldest, eldest daughter, had to help her mother out a lot before she was adopted.



* ShesAllGrownUp: Fanny gets this from all the ''nice'' members of her family, and Henry Crawford, who all eventually notice that while Maria and Julia were taking center-stage, particularly with their jealous fighting over Henry Crawford, Fanny grew up, and she only needed [[BeautifulAllAlong a little more confidence and a new dress]] to bring this to their attention. Of course, Mrs. Norris tries ''[[UpToEleven even harder]]'' to tear her down after she realises this.

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* ShesAllGrownUp: Fanny gets this from all the ''nice'' members of her family, and Henry Crawford, who all eventually notice that while Maria and Julia were taking center-stage, center stage, particularly with their jealous fighting over Henry Crawford, Fanny grew up, and she only needed [[BeautifulAllAlong a little more confidence and a new dress]] to bring this to their attention. Of course, Mrs. Norris tries ''[[UpToEleven even harder]]'' to tear her down after she realises this.



** Mrs. Norris boasts that it was she who made the match between her darling Maria and Mr Rushworth. She also ships Julia and Henry.

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** Mrs. Norris boasts that it was she who made the match between her darling Maria and Mr Mr. Rushworth. She also ships Julia and Henry.



** Toward the end of the book, [[spoiler:Sir Thomas is an ardent shipper of Edmund and Fanny; not only does he observe that she's the one helping Edmund get past his broken heart, but also he has come to realize how much he himself loves and values her, and would like nothing better than to be able to call her his daughter.]]



* [[SilentSnarker Silent]] ServileSnarker: Baddeley when Mrs. Norris tries to insist that Sir Thomas must want ''her'', not Fanny, to come speak to Mr. Crawford.

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* [[SilentSnarker Silent]] ServileSnarker: Baddeley Baddeley, when Mrs. Norris tries to insist that Sir Thomas must want ''her'', not Fanny, to come speak to Mr. Crawford.



* SpoiledBrat: The Crawfords and the younger generation of Bertrams, minus Edmund. Betsey Price counts as well because Fanny Price Sr. pampers her so much and lets her get away with everything.

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* SpoiledBrat: The Crawfords and the younger generation of Bertrams, minus Edmund. Betsey Price counts as well well, because Fanny Price Sr. pampers her so much and lets her get away with everything.



* YouGoGirl: Fanny calls out society (and by association everyone who's pressuring her to accept Henry Crawford's proposal) on the DoubleStandard of women being expected to cater to the whim of ''any'' suitor that comes along, no matter how he's treated her before. She rightly points out that, if she ''had'' actually taken Henry's behaviour as proof that he was interested in marrying her, she would have been maligned by her own gender for it and accused of getting ideas above her station. In stark contrast, ''' ''his'' ''' out-of-the-blue decision to propose is received by everyone as something extremely lucky for her, with no one taking her feelings into consideration. It shows up the sheer inequality that women were forced to abide by back in this era, condemning the act of any woman putting up with abuse just because her prospective partner is rich, and criticizing a society that could possibly favour said inequality. For the 1800s, her speech is pretty FairForItsDay, and you're not going to find anything closer to feminism until Creator/AnneBronte's ''Literature/TheTenantOfWildfellHall'' and Charlotte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' came on the scene. [[note]]Not in respectable fiction, anyway (nothing written by Lady Woolstonecroft or Aphra Benn really goes into that genre). Well, apart from Richardson's 'Clarissa'. And then some of Shakespeare's characters...[[/note]]

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* YouGoGirl: Fanny calls out society (and by association everyone who's pressuring her to accept Henry Crawford's proposal) on the DoubleStandard of women being expected to cater to the whim of ''any'' suitor that comes along, no matter how he's treated her before. She rightly points out that, if she ''had'' actually taken Henry's behaviour as proof that he was interested in marrying her, she would have been maligned by her own gender for it and accused of getting ideas above her station. In stark contrast, ''' ''his'' ''' out-of-the-blue decision to propose is received by everyone as something extremely lucky for her, with no one taking her feelings into consideration. It shows up the sheer inequality that women were forced to abide by back in this era, condemning the act of any woman putting up with abuse just because her prospective partner is rich, and criticizing a society that could possibly favour said inequality. For the 1800s, her speech is pretty FairForItsDay, and you're not going to find anything closer to feminism until Creator/AnneBronte's ''Literature/TheTenantOfWildfellHall'' and Charlotte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' came on the scene. [[note]]Not in respectable fiction, anyway (nothing written by Lady Woolstonecroft Wollstonecraft or Aphra Benn really goes into that genre). Well, apart from Richardson's 'Clarissa'. And then some of Shakespeare's characters...[[/note]]



* ZanyScheme: Mr. Yates wants to redo a cancelled amateur play with his new pals at Mansfield. First they have to decide on a script; since they're a bunch of spoiled rich kids, they need one where every character is the "best part". Half the group insists on a tragedy, the other on a comedy. Their production plan goes from a family amusement in one room to grand schemes of building a fully-dressed and appropriating the absent Sir Thomas' own bedchamber as their green room. And as for the play they finally settle on: it's ''Lover's Vows'', which they use as an excuse to flirt inappropriately with each other.

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* ZanyScheme: Mr. Yates wants to redo a cancelled amateur play with his new pals at Mansfield. First they have to decide on a script; since they're a bunch of spoiled rich kids, they need one where every character is the "best part". Half the group insists on a tragedy, the other on a comedy. Their production plan goes from a family amusement in one room to grand schemes of building a fully-dressed set and appropriating the absent Sir Thomas' own bedchamber as their green room. And as for the play they finally settle on: it's ''Lover's Vows'', which they use as an excuse to flirt inappropriately with each other.
22nd Oct '16 10:38:38 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* CreatorsApathy: [[invoked]] The cast of ''Lover's Vows'', with the exception of Mr. Yates, is concerned with the flirtations and betrayals which occur under cover of "rehearsals," rather than any serious attempt to produce the play.



* TheyJustDidntCare: [[invoked]] The cast of ''Lover's Vows'', with the exception of Mr. Yates, is concerned with the flirtations and betrayals which occur under cover of "rehearsals," rather than any serious attempt to produce the play.
26th Aug '16 12:03:27 AM LadyNorbert
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* BreakTheCutie: Fanny... ''the entire book''

to:

* BreakTheCutie: Fanny... ''the entire book''book.''



* DidYouThinkICannotFeel: Fanny after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and that marrying him would be a terrible idea.



* DoYouThinkICannotFeel: Fanny after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and that marrying him would be a terrible idea.



* LovingAShadow: Edmund towards Miss Crawford

to:

* LovingAShadow: Edmund towards Miss CrawfordCrawford.



* SirSwearsALot Lt. Price. D__ surprising for some Austen readers, but he d___ well comes as close as she would have been allowed to. (It's alleged that religious swears in this period were ''more'' offensive than sexual swears, although obviously these things are hard to quantify.)

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* SirSwearsALot Lt. Price. D__ surprising for some Austen readers, but he d___ well comes as close as she would have been allowed to.allowed. (It's alleged that religious swears in this period were ''more'' offensive than sexual swears, although obviously these things are hard to quantify.)



* ZanyScheme: Mr. Yates wants to redo a cancelled amateur play with his new pals at Mansfield. First they have to decide on a script--since they're a bunch of spoiled rich kids, they need one where every character is the "best part". Half the group insists on a tragedy, the other on a comedy. Their production plan goes from a family amusement in one room to grand schemes of building a fully-dressed and appropriating the absent Sir Thomas' own bedchamber as their green room. And as for the play they finally settle on: it's ''Lover's Vows'', which they use as an excuse to flirt inappropriately with each other.

to:

* ZanyScheme: Mr. Yates wants to redo a cancelled amateur play with his new pals at Mansfield. First they have to decide on a script--since script; since they're a bunch of spoiled rich kids, they need one where every character is the "best part". Half the group insists on a tragedy, the other on a comedy. Their production plan goes from a family amusement in one room to grand schemes of building a fully-dressed and appropriating the absent Sir Thomas' own bedchamber as their green room. And as for the play they finally settle on: it's ''Lover's Vows'', which they use as an excuse to flirt inappropriately with each other.
25th Aug '16 11:58:06 PM LadyNorbert
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* {{BookDumb}}: Fanny, when she first arrives at Mansfield Park, she knows very little about the arts or humanities. All she knows about are dumb things like how to help keep a house, how to look after babies, how to manage and educate younger kids, &c... Sadly for her, her two cousins (and the governess) are exactly the opposite. They're terribly accomplished, but so Life Dumb they don't know the difference between 'uneducated' and 'stupid', and, despite not being naturally mean, are spectacularly emotionally illiterate. Fanny makes up for lost time later, at least in theology and philosophy, with Edmund's help; but, because their confidence was built up too high, Maria and Julia never gain any wisdom until it's far too late.

to:

* {{BookDumb}}: BookDumb: Fanny, when she first arrives at Mansfield Park, she knows very little about the arts or humanities. All she knows about are dumb things like how to help keep a house, how to look after babies, how to manage and educate younger kids, &c... Sadly for her, her two cousins (and the governess) are exactly the opposite. They're terribly accomplished, but so Life Dumb they don't know the difference between 'uneducated' and 'stupid', and, despite not being naturally mean, are spectacularly emotionally illiterate. Fanny makes up for lost time later, at least in theology and philosophy, with Edmund's help; but, because their confidence was built up too high, Maria and Julia never gain any wisdom until it's far too late.
13th Aug '16 8:44:27 PM LadyNorbert
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* ALadyOnEachArm: Henry Crawford with Maria and Julia. Later, when he visits Portsmouth, he repeats it with Fanny and her sister Susan -- though in that case, Susan's presence [[ThirdWheel certainly wasn't his idea.]]



* ALadyOnEachArm: Henry Crawford with Maria and Julia. Later, when he visits Portsmouth, he repeats it with Fanny and her sister Susan -- though in that case, Susan's presence [[ThirdWheel certainly wasn't his idea.]]



** In the Bertram household, Mrs Norris indulges all the Bertram siblings, but she greatly prefers Maria and Tom. Maria is her particular darling. She doesn't care about Edmund much and openly abuses Fanny to elevate Maria and Julia. Sir Thomas is strict with everybody and Lady Bertram can't be bothered to care about her children.
** In the Price household, we see that Mrs Price values her sons over her daughters. Her eldest William is her favourite, yet luckily it didn't spoil him. Little Betsy is the only daughter that Mrs Price likes and she spoils her horribly. Poor Susan is TheUnfavourite for being a girl and not the youngest cutest child, and lashes out a lot as a result. Fanny helps her deal with it and ultimately has her move to Mansfield Park.
* PrincessForADay: Fanny at her coming-out ball, and to a lesser extent, this is basically how she is treated whenever Maria and Julia are not at Mansfield.

to:

** In the Bertram household, Mrs Mrs. Norris indulges all the Bertram siblings, but she greatly prefers Maria and Tom. Maria is her particular darling. She doesn't care about Edmund much and openly abuses Fanny to elevate Maria and Julia. Sir Thomas is strict with everybody and Lady Bertram can't be bothered to care about her children.
** In the Price household, we see that Mrs Mrs. Price values her sons over her daughters. Her eldest William eldest, William, is her favourite, yet luckily it didn't spoil him. Little Betsy is the only daughter that Mrs Price likes and she spoils her horribly. Poor Susan is TheUnfavourite for being a girl and not the youngest cutest child, and lashes out a lot as a result. Fanny helps her deal with it it, and ultimately has is eventually able to bring her move back to Mansfield Park.
Park to get away from it.
* PrincessForADay: Fanny at her coming-out ball, and coming out ball; to a lesser extent, this is basically how she is treated whenever Maria and Julia are not at Mansfield.



** Fanny as the eldest had to help her mother out a lot before she was adopted.
** Edmund while his father is away.
%%* ThePlace

to:

** Fanny Fanny, as the eldest eldest, had to help her mother out a lot before she was adopted.
** Edmund Edmund, while his father is away.
%%* ThePlace* ThePlace: The book is named after the marvelous estate where most of the story takes place.



* RightInFrontOfMe: Miss Crawford mocking the clergy to Edmund right before Julia reveals that as his chosen profession.
* RichBitch: Mary Crawford, but Maria Bertram even moreso. Although Julia can still give both of them a run for their money when she decides to ''really'' dig deep and pull out the claws.

to:

* RightInFrontOfMe: Miss Crawford mocking the clergy to Edmund right before Julia reveals that as it's his chosen profession.
* RichBitch: Mary Crawford, but Maria Bertram even moreso. Although more so. Julia can still give both of them a run for their money when she decides to ''really'' dig deep and pull out the claws.



* SheepInSheepsClothing: Fanny is this in-universe. Part of what makes Sir Thomas's Breaking Speech so heart-wrenching is that ''she even starts believing it herself'', and many people start re-assessing their opinion on her, when, as she later states, [[spoiler: refusing to accept Crawford's proposal]] is perfectly understandable no matter how charming and well-liked the Crawfords are in Mansfield, if only because it's her choice, not the Bertrams's.
* ShesAllGrownUp: Fanny gets this from all the ''nice'' members of her family, and Henry Crawford, who all eventually notice that while Maria and Julia were taking centre-stage, particularly with their jealous fighting over Henry Crawford, Fanny grew up, and she only needed [[BeautifulAllAlong a little more confidence and a new dress]] to bring this to their attention. Of course Mrs. Norris tries ''[[UpToEleven even harder]]'' to tear her down after she realises this.

to:

* SheepInSheepsClothing: Fanny is this in-universe. Part of what makes Sir Thomas's Breaking Speech so heart-wrenching is that ''she even starts believing it herself'', and many people start re-assessing their opinion on her, when, as she later states, [[spoiler: refusing to accept Crawford's proposal]] is perfectly understandable no matter how charming and well-liked the Crawfords are in Mansfield, if only because it's her choice, not the Bertrams's.Bertrams'.
* ShesAllGrownUp: Fanny gets this from all the ''nice'' members of her family, and Henry Crawford, who all eventually notice that while Maria and Julia were taking centre-stage, center-stage, particularly with their jealous fighting over Henry Crawford, Fanny grew up, and she only needed [[BeautifulAllAlong a little more confidence and a new dress]] to bring this to their attention. Of course course, Mrs. Norris tries ''[[UpToEleven even harder]]'' to tear her down after she realises this.



** At first, Mrs Grant ships Mary and Tom and Julia and Henry, even before they meet each other as she would just love to have her half-siblings settled near her home.
** Mrs Norris boasts that it was her who made the match between her darling Maria and Mr Rushworth. She also ships Julia and Henry.
** Sir Thomas supports Mary and Edmund as their relationship is openly acknowledged even though there was no formal proposal or engagement.

to:

** At first, Mrs Mrs. Grant ships Mary and Tom and Julia and Henry, even before they meet each other other, as she would just love to have her half-siblings settled near her home.
** Mrs Mrs. Norris boasts that it was her she who made the match between her darling Maria and Mr Rushworth. She also ships Julia and Henry.
** Sir Thomas supports Mary and Edmund as their relationship is openly acknowledged acknowledged, even though there was no formal proposal or engagement.



* SiblingTriangle: Maria and Julia compete for affection of Henry Crawford.
* SiblingYinYang: Tom and Edmund Bertram; Fanny and the more lively, confident Susan Price

to:

* SiblingTriangle: Maria and Julia compete for the affection of Henry Crawford.
* SiblingYinYang: Tom and Edmund Bertram; Fanny and the more lively, confident Susan PricePrice.



* SpoiledBrat: the Crawfords and the younger generation of Bertrams, minus Edmund. Betsey Price counts as well because Fanny Price Sr. pampers her so much and lets her get away with everything.

to:

* SpoiledBrat: the The Crawfords and the younger generation of Bertrams, minus Edmund. Betsey Price counts as well because Fanny Price Sr. pampers her so much and lets her get away with everything.



* TheUnfavorite: Fanny. She was The Unfavorite for her mother before she got to Mansfield and she's Mrs Norris's least favorite niece at Mansfield.

to:

* TheUnfavorite: Fanny. She was The Unfavorite for her mother before she got to Mansfield Mansfield, and she's Mrs Mrs. Norris's least favorite niece at Mansfield.



* WickedStepmother: Mrs. Norris is Fanny's aunt but otherwise fits the trope dead on. Considering that it was her idea in the first place to "adopt" Fanny, this comes very close to actually happening. Fanny's only saved by it because Mrs. Norris was too selfish to want to take even rudimentary care of her niece.

to:

* WickedStepmother: Mrs. Norris is Fanny's aunt aunt, but otherwise fits the trope dead on. Considering that it was her idea in the first place to "adopt" Fanny, this comes very close to actually happening. Fanny's only saved by it because Mrs. Norris was too selfish to want to take even rudimentary care of her niece.



* YouGoGirl: Fanny calls out society (and by association everyone who's pressuring her to accept Henry Crawford's proposal) on the DoubleStandard of women being expected to cater to the whim of ''any'' suitor that comes along, no matter how he's treated her before. She rightly points out that, if she ''had'' actually taken Henry's behaviour as proof that he was interested in marrying her, she would have been maligned by her own gender for it and accused of getting ideas above her station. In stark contrast, ''' ''his'' ''' out-of-the-blue decision to propose is received by everyone as something extremely lucky for her, with no one taking her own feelings into consideration. It shows up the sheer inequality that women were forced to abide by back in this era, condemning the act of any woman putting up with abuse just because her prospective partner is rich, and criticizing a society that could possibly favour said inequality. For the 1800s, her speech is pretty FairForItsDay, and you're not going to find anything closer to feminism until Creator/AnneBronte's ''Literature/TheTenantOfWildfellHall'' and Charlotte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' came on the scene. [[note]]Not in respectable fiction, anyway (nothing written by Lady Woolstonecroft or Aphra Benn really goes into that genre). Well, apart from Richardson's 'Clarissa'. And then some of Shakespeare's characters...[[/note]]

to:

* YouGoGirl: Fanny calls out society (and by association everyone who's pressuring her to accept Henry Crawford's proposal) on the DoubleStandard of women being expected to cater to the whim of ''any'' suitor that comes along, no matter how he's treated her before. She rightly points out that, if she ''had'' actually taken Henry's behaviour as proof that he was interested in marrying her, she would have been maligned by her own gender for it and accused of getting ideas above her station. In stark contrast, ''' ''his'' ''' out-of-the-blue decision to propose is received by everyone as something extremely lucky for her, with no one taking her own feelings into consideration. It shows up the sheer inequality that women were forced to abide by back in this era, condemning the act of any woman putting up with abuse just because her prospective partner is rich, and criticizing a society that could possibly favour said inequality. For the 1800s, her speech is pretty FairForItsDay, and you're not going to find anything closer to feminism until Creator/AnneBronte's ''Literature/TheTenantOfWildfellHall'' and Charlotte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' came on the scene. [[note]]Not in respectable fiction, anyway (nothing written by Lady Woolstonecroft or Aphra Benn really goes into that genre). Well, apart from Richardson's 'Clarissa'. And then some of Shakespeare's characters...[[/note]]



* ZanyScheme: Mr. Yates wants to redo a cancelled amateur play with his new pals at Mansfield. First they have to decide on a script--since they're a bunch of spoiled rich kids, they need one where every character is the "best part". Half the group insists on a tragedy, the other on a comedy. Their production plan goes from a family amusement in one room to grand schemes of building a fully-dressed and appropriating the absent Sir Thomas' own bedchamber as their green room. And as for the play they finally settle on: it's "Lover's Vows", which they use as an excuse to flirt inappropriately with each other.

to:

* ZanyScheme: Mr. Yates wants to redo a cancelled amateur play with his new pals at Mansfield. First they have to decide on a script--since they're a bunch of spoiled rich kids, they need one where every character is the "best part". Half the group insists on a tragedy, the other on a comedy. Their production plan goes from a family amusement in one room to grand schemes of building a fully-dressed and appropriating the absent Sir Thomas' own bedchamber as their green room. And as for the play they finally settle on: it's "Lover's Vows", ''Lover's Vows'', which they use as an excuse to flirt inappropriately with each other.
14th Jun '16 1:06:04 AM PaulA
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Added DiffLines:

* AccompliceByInaction: Edmund, despite being a NiceGuy, stands up to Fanny only when his fling Mary Crawford is not concerned. Mary herself is a more clear-cut example, since her answer to her brother's tentative of attracting Fanny's affection to leave her sighing and depressed like her cousins is basically a cross between ThatMakesMeFeelAngry and "whatever, anyway I told you so and it's not my business."


Added DiffLines:

* WrongGuyFirst: Edmund has to get burned by Mary Crawford before he recognises Fanny's worth and Fanny is almost tempted away from Edmund, her first love, by Mary's brother Henry.
12th Jun '16 2:12:57 PM Ciara25
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* SilkHidingSteel: Fanny, to everyone's surprise. She may be a child abuse victim and an EmotionlessGirl, but she ''does'' have a level head on his shoulders.

to:

* SilkHidingSteel: Fanny, to everyone's surprise. She may be a child abuse victim and an EmotionlessGirl, but she ''does'' have a level head on her shoulders, recognises that marriage to Henry would be terrible, and repeatedly refuses his shoulders.suit.
27th May '16 3:54:34 PM Jayalaw
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* DoYouThinkICannotFeel: Fanny after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and

to:

* DoYouThinkICannotFeel: Fanny after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and that marrying him would be a terrible idea.
30th Apr '16 9:59:02 AM Jayalaw
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* DoYouThinkICannotFeel: Fanny after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and



* KarmaHoudini: Henry Crawford for [[spoiler:disgracing Maria]], though he DidNotGetTheGirl.



* LaserGuidedKarma:
** Mrs. Norris has spent a lifetime bullying Fanny, making her feel useless while spoiling her nieces Maria and Julia rotten. [[spoiler:Come the end, she's moved in with a disgraced Maria to take care of her for the rest of her life and has to live with her mistakes.]]
** Fanny, being kind and virtuous, [[spoiler:marries Edward at the end and finally receives the respect she deserves.]]



* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: Sir Thomas Bertram after [[spoiler:Maria elopes with Henry Crawford, proving Fanny was right to not accept his proposal]] and the family's reputation goes to hell. He immediately dives into MustMakeAmends towards Fanny.



* PromotionToParent: Edmund while his father is away.

to:

* PromotionToParent: PromotionToParent:
** Fanny as the eldest had to help her mother out a lot before she was adopted.
**
Edmund while his father is away.


Added DiffLines:

* SilkHidingSteel: Fanny, to everyone's surprise. She may be a child abuse victim and an EmotionlessGirl, but she ''does'' have a level head on his shoulders.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.MansfieldPark