History Literature / MansfieldPark

10th Oct '17 6:49:54 AM Julia1984
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* GenreRefugee: Many agree with Creators/CSLewis that Fanny Price, in hindsight, comes across as "[[UnbuiltTrope a Bronte sisters heroine]] lost in a Jane Austen novel."
1st Oct '17 2:32:00 AM Ciara25
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* YouGoGirl: Fanny calls out society (and by association everyone who's pressuring her to accept Henry Crawford's proposal) on the DoubleStandard of women being expected to cater to the whim of ''any'' suitor that comes along, no matter how he's treated her before. She rightly points out that, if she ''had'' actually taken Henry's behaviour as proof that he was interested in marrying her, she would have been maligned by her own gender for it and accused of getting ideas above her station. In stark contrast, ''' ''his'' ''' out-of-the-blue decision to propose is received by everyone as something extremely lucky for her, with no one taking her feelings into consideration. It shows up the sheer inequality that women were forced to abide by back in this era, condemning the act of any woman putting up with abuse just because her prospective partner is rich, and criticizing a society that could possibly favour said inequality. For the 1800s, her speech is pretty FairForItsDay, and you're not going to find anything closer to feminism until Creator/AnneBronte's ''Literature/TheTenantOfWildfellHall'' and Charlotte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' came on the scene. [[note]]Not in respectable fiction, anyway (nothing written by Lady Wollstonecraft or Aphra Benn really goes into that genre). Well, apart from Richardson's 'Clarissa'. And then some of Shakespeare's characters...[[/note]]

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* YouGoGirl: Fanny calls out society (and by association everyone who's pressuring her to accept Henry Crawford's proposal) on the DoubleStandard of women being expected to cater to the whim of ''any'' suitor that comes along, no matter how he's treated her before. She rightly points out that, if she ''had'' actually taken Henry's behaviour previous flirtations as proof that he was interested in marrying her, she would have been maligned by her own gender for it and accused of getting ideas above her station. In stark contrast, ''' ''his'' ''' out-of-the-blue decision to propose is received by everyone as something extremely lucky for her, with no one taking her feelings into consideration. It shows up the sheer inequality that women were forced to abide by back in this era, condemning the act of any woman putting up with abuse just because her prospective partner is rich, and criticizing a society that could possibly favour said inequality. For the 1800s, her speech is pretty FairForItsDay, and you're not going to find anything closer to feminism until Creator/AnneBronte's ''Literature/TheTenantOfWildfellHall'' and Charlotte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' came on the scene. [[note]]Not in respectable fiction, anyway (nothing written by Lady Wollstonecraft or Aphra Benn really goes into that genre). Well, apart from Richardson's 'Clarissa'. And then some of Shakespeare's characters...[[/note]]
30th Aug '17 7:21:21 AM XFllo
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* AccompliceByInaction: Edmund, despite being a NiceGuy, stands up for Fanny only when his fling Mary Crawford is not concerned. SubvertedTrope in a CrowningMomentOfAwesome near the end. [[spoiler: Before even having his LoveEpiphany]], he completely ''loses it'' when he thinks Mary is blaming Fanny's disinterest for Henry transfering his StalkerWithACrush behavior on Edmund's sister [[spoiler: with whom he ends up having an affair]]. [[AloofBigBrother Edmund isn't even trying to defend his sister's reputation]]. He's just incensed that she [[TheScapegoat dared]] [[OnlySaneMan criticize]] [[TrueCompanions Fanny]].
** Mary herself is a more clear-cut example, since her answer to her brother's tentative efforts of attracting Fanny's affection to leave her sighing and depressed like her cousins is basically a cross between ThatMakesMeFeelAngry and "whatever, anyway I told you so and it's not my business."

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* AccompliceByInaction: AccompliceByInaction:
**
Edmund, despite being a NiceGuy, stands up for Fanny only when his fling Mary Crawford is not concerned. SubvertedTrope in a CrowningMomentOfAwesome near the end. [[spoiler: Before even having his LoveEpiphany]], he completely ''loses it'' when he thinks Mary is blaming Fanny's disinterest for Henry transfering his StalkerWithACrush behavior on Edmund's sister [[spoiler: with whom he ends up having an affair]].affair. [[AloofBigBrother Edmund isn't even trying to defend his sister's reputation]]. He's just incensed that she [[TheScapegoat dared]] [[OnlySaneMan criticize]] [[TrueCompanions dared criticize Fanny]].
** Mary herself is a more clear-cut example, since her answer to her brother's tentative efforts of attracting Fanny's affection to leave her sighing and depressed like her cousins is basically a cross between ThatMakesMeFeelAngry and "whatever, anyway I told you so and it's not my business."



* BrokenPedestal: Edmund starts off as Fanny's only real friend in the household, and because he's older (he seems "almost a man" to her) he shows her kindness, intervenes in her education and helps her choose books on poetry, theology, philosophy and other subjects, he inadvertently creates a PygmalionPlot. She becomes an unintended Galatea, sharing many of his tastes and principles and almost worshiping him, while he only sees her as a little sister figure. However, when he starts misbehaving as a reason of his obsessive crush for Mary Crawford and of her inconsistent responses, Fanny is shown to become increasingly disappointed. This eventually becomes serious enough for her to vent her frustrations at his loved ones's (and, for all she knows, his) archaic view of the marriage market (she doesn't think Henry Crawford is [[EntitledToHaveYou entitled to have her]], even if it's convenient for him and everyone else). When he completely misses her meaning and thinks she's just too shy to admit what he thinks is a blatant crush on Henry, all the while constantly complaining about the state of his love affair with Mary and being ObliviousToLove, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny Fanny ends up ranting at his long-awaited letters instead of rejoicing at reading them]].

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* BrokenPedestal: Edmund starts off as Fanny's only real friend in the household, and because he's older (he seems "almost a man" to her) he shows her kindness, intervenes in her education and helps her choose books on poetry, theology, philosophy and other subjects, he inadvertently creates a PygmalionPlot. She becomes an unintended Galatea, sharing many of his tastes and principles and almost worshiping him, while he only sees her as a little sister figure. However, when he starts misbehaving as a reason of his obsessive crush for Mary Crawford and of her inconsistent responses, Fanny is shown to become increasingly disappointed. This eventually becomes serious enough for her to vent her frustrations at his loved ones's (and, for all she knows, his) archaic view of the marriage market (she doesn't think Henry Crawford is [[EntitledToHaveYou entitled to have her]], even if it's convenient for him and everyone else). When he completely misses her meaning and thinks she's just too shy to admit what he thinks is a blatant crush on Henry, all the while constantly complaining about the state of his love affair with Mary and being ObliviousToLove, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny Fanny ends up ranting at his long-awaited letters instead of rejoicing at reading them]]. them.



* LetNoCrisisGoToWaste: In the 1999 film, when everything has gone wrong, Mary Crawford plays this trope in a speech that's couched in terms of being useful, realistic, worldly advice from a well-meaning friend. [[spoiler: Subverted, in that it's actually her last and boldest attempt to undermine them and force them to accept her as the de facto boss of the house, and is therefore an example of BreakThemByTalking. Fanny sees it for what it is, but has no hope that the others will recognise it; everyone else is so stunned that they don't know what to do. Fortunately, in a CrowningMomentOfAwesome, Edmund tells Mary, in the politest possible language, to go fuck herself.]]

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* LetNoCrisisGoToWaste: In the 1999 film, when everything has gone wrong, Mary Crawford plays this trope in a speech that's couched in terms of being useful, realistic, worldly advice from a well-meaning friend. [[spoiler: Subverted, in that it's actually her last and boldest attempt to undermine them and force them to accept her as the de facto boss of the house, and is therefore an example of BreakThemByTalking. Fanny sees it for what it is, but has no hope that the others will recognise it; everyone else is so stunned that they don't know what to do. Fortunately, in a CrowningMomentOfAwesome, Edmund tells Mary, in the politest possible language, to go fuck herself.]]
14th Aug '17 4:13:04 PM eowynjedi
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* InstantlyProvenWrong: When Fanny is invited to dine at the Grants, Mrs. Norris is outraged and goes on a several-paragraph tirade to tell Fanny that she mustn't think it's because of her own merits, that it's a politeness to Lady Bertram, that she'd better not embarrass the family, and most of all she should ''not'' expect to take the carriage, just as Sir Thomas opens the door:
--> "Fanny, at what time would you have the carriage come round?"



* LovingAShadow: Edmund towards Miss Crawford.

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* LovingAShadow: Edmund towards Miss Crawford. He's charmed by her lively speech and her beauty, but he constantly rationalizes away her selfishness and her making light of everything important as the result of "bad influences" which will of course soon be cured by life in the country.



* TheQuietOne: Fanny.

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* TheQuietOne: Fanny. Nobody is really interested in her opinion except Edmund (unless Mary is involved, and in that case he's not) and she's been continually instructed that she's lesser and shouldn't put herself forward, so she doesn't even think of speaking up most of the time.
12th Aug '17 5:58:48 PM eowynjedi
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* AmazinglyEmbarrassingParents: Lt. and Mrs. Price. Mrs. Price can't manage her overstuffed household and blatantly favors her boys and youngest daughter over her older daughter Susan. Lieutenant Price, meanwhile, drinks and swears and is abominably rude. Fanny is mortified when she and Henry run into him while out walking in Portsmouth.



* BrokenPedestal: Edmund starts off as Fanny's only real friend in the household, and because he's older (he seems "almost a man" to her) he shows her kindness, intervenes in her edication and helps her choose books on poetry, theology, philosophy and other subjects, he inadvertantly creates a PygmalionPlot. She becomes an unintended Galatea, sharing many of his tastes and principles and almost worshiping him, while he only sees her as a little sister figure. However, when he starts misbehaving as a reason of his obsessive crush for Mary Crawford and of her inconsistent responses, Fanny is shown to become increasingly disappointed. This eventually becomes serious enough for her to vent her frustrations at his loved ones's (and, for all she knows, his) archaic view of the marriage market (she doesn't think Henry Crawford is [[EntitledToHaveYou entitled to have her]], even if it's convenient for him and everyone else). When he completely misses her meaning and thinks she's just too shy to admit what he thinks is a blatant crush on Henry, all the while constantly complaining about the state of his love affair with Mary and being ObliviousToLove, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny Fanny ends up ranting at his long-awaited letters instead of rejoicing at reading them]].
* TheCassandra: Fanny is an interesting, partly self-inflicted example. She's been taught to constantly feel and express gratefulness since she was accepted into her richer relatives' home, and therfore has a huge inferiority complex. This means that while she's in a perfect position to observe and discover things first (watching from the sidelines, barely noticed yet at everybody's disposal) she can feel really guilty about spoting other's imperfections and misbehaviors (it feels "uncharitable" to judge them when she ought to be grateful), even more about reporting it. As a result, the one time she raises concern about the mistakes that might ruin her cousin Maria's life, she does it in such an indirect, contorted way that her interlocutor doesn't get it and shrugs it off. Her having NoSocialSkills doesn't help.

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* BrokenPedestal: Edmund starts off as Fanny's only real friend in the household, and because he's older (he seems "almost a man" to her) he shows her kindness, intervenes in her edication education and helps her choose books on poetry, theology, philosophy and other subjects, he inadvertantly inadvertently creates a PygmalionPlot. She becomes an unintended Galatea, sharing many of his tastes and principles and almost worshiping him, while he only sees her as a little sister figure. However, when he starts misbehaving as a reason of his obsessive crush for Mary Crawford and of her inconsistent responses, Fanny is shown to become increasingly disappointed. This eventually becomes serious enough for her to vent her frustrations at his loved ones's (and, for all she knows, his) archaic view of the marriage market (she doesn't think Henry Crawford is [[EntitledToHaveYou entitled to have her]], even if it's convenient for him and everyone else). When he completely misses her meaning and thinks she's just too shy to admit what he thinks is a blatant crush on Henry, all the while constantly complaining about the state of his love affair with Mary and being ObliviousToLove, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny Fanny ends up ranting at his long-awaited letters instead of rejoicing at reading them]].
* TheCassandra: Fanny is an interesting, partly self-inflicted example. She's been taught to constantly feel and express gratefulness since she was accepted into her richer relatives' home, and therfore therefore has a huge inferiority complex. This means that while she's in a perfect position to observe and discover things first (watching from the sidelines, barely noticed yet at everybody's disposal) she can feel really guilty about spoting spotting other's imperfections and misbehaviors (it feels "uncharitable" to judge them when she ought to be grateful), even more about reporting it. As a result, the one time she raises concern about the mistakes that might ruin her cousin Maria's life, she does it in such an indirect, contorted way that her interlocutor doesn't get it and shrugs it off. Her having NoSocialSkills doesn't help.



* CityMouse: Mary Crawford

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* CityMouse: Henry and Mary CrawfordCrawford are both entirely unfamiliar with life in the country, shocked at how long it takes for things to get done (with no thought given to it being the harvest season), and were afraid that visiting their sister Mrs. Grant would offer little entertainment, though they find themselves well-pleased with the society of the Bertrams.



* DarkerAndEdgier: In comparison to Austen's other novels, with a heroine who comes from a much less-wealthy family than the others' and suffers from the painfully realistic effects of a lifetime of psychological abuse, a particularly cruel and malicious antagonist (Mrs. Norris) rather than a merely arrogant, pompous one like [[Literature/PrideAndPrejudice Lady Catherine]], an actual case of adultery (and possibly off-screen sex during the Sotherton expedition), and its BittersweetEnding.

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* DarkerAndEdgier: In comparison to Austen's other novels, with a heroine who comes from a much less-wealthy family than the others' and suffers from the painfully realistic effects of a lifetime of psychological abuse, a particularly cruel and malicious antagonist with genuine power over the heroine (Mrs. Norris) rather than a merely arrogant, pompous one like [[Literature/PrideAndPrejudice Lady Catherine]], an actual case of adultery (and possibly off-screen sex during the Sotherton expedition), and its BittersweetEnding.



* FoolishSiblingResponsibleSibling: Tom Bertram considers his only responsibility to be enjoying himself as much as possible before he inherits, leaving to Edmund the management of the household and its behavior in their father's absence. Tom's profligacy also forces Edmund to delay entering the clergy, and he routinely exercises veto power as the eldest son whenever he thinks Edmund is being stuffy.



* HappilyEverAfter: It's a ForegoneConclusion.

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* HappilyEverAfter: It's a ForegoneConclusion. Though it's not happy for everyone involved.



** Tom, Maria, and Julia all complain that Edmund is being far too "nice," which used to mean precise and which they mean to say that he's being fussy over proper behavior. (The word was already shifting its meaning to the modern form, however; a character in Austen's [[Literature/NorthangerAbbey first written novel]] complains about it at length.)



* ParentsAsPeople: Sir Thomas and Lady Bertram love their children, but are very ineffective as parental figures. Lady Bertram doesn't stir herself to raise them (she's more interested in her dog), so she and Sir Thomas delegate mothering to Mrs. Norris, who spoils them and sets them against each other. Sir Thomas tries to correct for the overindulgence, and ends up being so stern that they use his absence as an excuse to go wild, barring Edmund and Fanny.



** Edmund, while his father is away.

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** Edmund, while his father is away. Not that his sisters listen to him, and Tom promptly seizes the position once he gets back himself.



* SirSwearsALot Lt. Price. D__ surprising for some Austen readers, but he d___ well comes as close as she would have been allowed. (It's alleged that religious swears in this period were ''more'' offensive than sexual swears, although obviously these things are hard to quantify.)
* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism: Farthest of Austen's novels from the Ideal end.

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* SirSwearsALot Lt. Price. D__ surprising for some Austen readers, but he d___ d__ well comes as close as she would have been allowed. (It's alleged that religious swears in this period were ''more'' offensive than sexual swears, although obviously these things are hard to quantify.)
* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism: Farthest of Austen's novels from the Ideal end. Fanny gets her love, and 5/6ths of the Betrams are properly chastened and make a sincere effort to improve after the adultery crisis. But Henry gets away scot-free while Maria has to live in exile with Mrs. Norris, who continues to insist that it's NeverMyFault.



* ThirdWheel: Fanny's younger sister Susan, to Henry Crawford when he visits Fanny in Portsmouth.

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* ThirdWheel: Fanny's younger sister Susan, to Henry Crawford when he visits Fanny in Portsmouth.Portsmouth to continue his unwanted courtship of her.
10th Aug '17 8:46:36 AM Lorialet
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* AccompliceByInaction: Edmund, despite being a NiceGuy, stands up for Fanny only when his fling Mary Crawford is not concerned. Mary herself is a more clear-cut example, since her answer to her brother's tentative efforts of attracting Fanny's affection to leave her sighing and depressed like her cousins is basically a cross between ThatMakesMeFeelAngry and "whatever, anyway I told you so and it's not my business."

to:

* AccompliceByInaction: Edmund, despite being a NiceGuy, stands up for Fanny only when his fling Mary Crawford is not concerned. SubvertedTrope in a CrowningMomentOfAwesome near the end. [[spoiler: Before even having his LoveEpiphany]], he completely ''loses it'' when he thinks Mary is blaming Fanny's disinterest for Henry transfering his StalkerWithACrush behavior on Edmund's sister [[spoiler: with whom he ends up having an affair]]. [[AloofBigBrother Edmund isn't even trying to defend his sister's reputation]]. He's just incensed that she [[TheScapegoat dared]] [[OnlySaneMan criticize]] [[TrueCompanions Fanny]].
**
Mary herself is a more clear-cut example, since her answer to her brother's tentative efforts of attracting Fanny's affection to leave her sighing and depressed like her cousins is basically a cross between ThatMakesMeFeelAngry and "whatever, anyway I told you so and it's not my business."



* AloofBigBrother: While he's full of kindness and concern for Fanny, Edmund is much more distant and less involved with his own sisters. This could be the fruit of their own behavior, however, as they revel in his mistakes when he falls from his moral pedestal as a reason of his crush for Mary Crawford, don't really show any interest in his own feelings, and generally never seem to even ''want'' a good relationship.



* TheCassandra: Fanny

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* BrokenPedestal: Edmund starts off as Fanny's only real friend in the household, and because he's older (he seems "almost a man" to her) he shows her kindness, intervenes in her edication and helps her choose books on poetry, theology, philosophy and other subjects, he inadvertantly creates a PygmalionPlot. She becomes an unintended Galatea, sharing many of his tastes and principles and almost worshiping him, while he only sees her as a little sister figure. However, when he starts misbehaving as a reason of his obsessive crush for Mary Crawford and of her inconsistent responses, Fanny is shown to become increasingly disappointed. This eventually becomes serious enough for her to vent her frustrations at his loved ones's (and, for all she knows, his) archaic view of the marriage market (she doesn't think Henry Crawford is [[EntitledToHaveYou entitled to have her]], even if it's convenient for him and everyone else). When he completely misses her meaning and thinks she's just too shy to admit what he thinks is a blatant crush on Henry, all the while constantly complaining about the state of his love affair with Mary and being ObliviousToLove, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny Fanny ends up ranting at his long-awaited letters instead of rejoicing at reading them]].
* TheCassandra: FannyFanny is an interesting, partly self-inflicted example. She's been taught to constantly feel and express gratefulness since she was accepted into her richer relatives' home, and therfore has a huge inferiority complex. This means that while she's in a perfect position to observe and discover things first (watching from the sidelines, barely noticed yet at everybody's disposal) she can feel really guilty about spoting other's imperfections and misbehaviors (it feels "uncharitable" to judge them when she ought to be grateful), even more about reporting it. As a result, the one time she raises concern about the mistakes that might ruin her cousin Maria's life, she does it in such an indirect, contorted way that her interlocutor doesn't get it and shrugs it off. Her having NoSocialSkills doesn't help.



* ClusterFBomb: Mr. Price's constant use of the phrase "By God!" is treated like this, due to the period in which it was written. (It's studiously rendered as "By G--" in the text.) Fanny is very embarrassed by this.

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* ClusterFBomb: Mr. Price's constant use of the phrase "By God!" is treated like this, due to the period in which it was written. (It's studiously rendered as "By G--" in the text.) Fanny is very embarrassed by this.this, especially when her StalkerWithACrush comes to visit. She wants him to give up on her, [[NotSoAboveItAll not to think that she and her entire family are nineteenth century England's answer to white trash]].



** Lady Bertram is a stupid, vapid woman.
** Mr. Rushworth is lucky that he's insanely rich, otherwise he wouldn't get any respect.

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** Lady Bertram is a stupid, vapid woman.
woman. Fanny tries to [[ExploitedTrope exploit]] it, hoping that she'll be as impulsive and inappropriate as ever, and will bluntly express her desire to keep Fanny waiting on her at home, thus helping her miss a ''wonderful'' marriage opportunity she actually doesn't want in the first place. Infuriatingly [[SubvertedTrope subverted]] when Lady Bertram proves that EveryoneHasStandards, understanding the wider implications the match would have for Fanny and acting almost like a mature, responsible human being.
** Mr. Rushworth is lucky that he's insanely rich, otherwise he wouldn't get any respect.



* TheDutifulSon: Edmund

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* TheDutifulSon: EdmundEdmund, untill his love for Mary makes him waver about what he ought to do.



* HandsomeLech: Henry Crawford

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* HandsomeLech: Henry CrawfordCrawford. Though it seems to be more a matter of personality and style than just his appearance, as no one at Mansfield Park finds him handsome at first, but eventually everyone but Fanny does. [[NotSoAboveItAll The narration implies that even she changed her mind towards the end]].
28th Jul '17 10:45:58 AM Julia1984
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* DarkerAndEdgier: The book supposed to be this to ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice''. It was also supposed to be not about marriage at all, but ordination; that was the intention, anyway.

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* DarkerAndEdgier: The book supposed In comparison to be this to ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice''. It was also supposed to be not about marriage at all, but ordination; that was Austen's other novels, with a heroine who comes from a much less-wealthy family than the intention, anyway.others' and suffers from the painfully realistic effects of a lifetime of psychological abuse, a particularly cruel and malicious antagonist (Mrs. Norris) rather than a merely arrogant, pompous one like [[Literature/PrideAndPrejudice Lady Catherine]], an actual case of adultery (and possibly off-screen sex during the Sotherton expedition), and its BittersweetEnding.



* DidYouThinkICannotFeel: Fanny, after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and that marrying him would be a terrible idea.

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* DidYouThinkICannotFeel: DidYouThinkICantFeel: Fanny, after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and that marrying him would be a terrible idea.


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* SexyDiscretionShot: It's a very popular, very sincere scholarly interpretation that Maria Bertram and Henry Crawford had sex after they got away from the group during the trip to Sotherton.
19th Jun '17 4:40:04 AM john_e
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[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njBFxjzu7_E From Mansfield With Love]], an ongoing modern adaptation in the vein of [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/WebVideo/TheLizzieBennetDiaries?from=Main.TheLizzieBennetDiaries The Lizzie Bennet Diaries]] began airing on Youtube in December 2014.

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[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njBFxjzu7_E From Mansfield With Love]], an ongoing ''WebVideo/FromMansfieldWithLove'', a modern adaptation in the vein of [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/WebVideo/TheLizzieBennetDiaries?from=Main.TheLizzieBennetDiaries The Lizzie Bennet Diaries]] began airing aired on Youtube in from December 2014.
2014 to November 2015.
12th Feb '17 12:44:06 PM morenohijazo
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Added DiffLines:



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* TheWickedStage: Fanny's disapproval of private theatricals is a mark of her character.
31st Oct '16 8:17:21 PM LadyNorbert
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The Bertrams' eldest son Tom is harmless, aside from driving the family deeper into debt every day. Their daughters, Maria and Julia, look down on Fanny but mostly ignore her. Her only friend is their second son Edmund, six years her senior, who is always there to comfort and defend his cousin and do his best to make her happy. So it's a small wonder that 18-year-old Fanny eventually realizes she's fallen in love with him (no taboo against KissingCousins in this context, remember?).

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The Bertrams' eldest son Tom is harmless, aside from driving the family deeper into debt every day. Their daughters, Maria and Julia, look down on Fanny but mostly ignore her. Her only friend is their second son Edmund, six years her senior, who is always there to comfort and defend his cousin and do his best to make her happy. So it's a small wonder that 18-year-old Fanny eventually realizes she's fallen in love with him (no (remember, there was no taboo against KissingCousins in this context, remember?).
context).



* AccompliceByInaction: Edmund, despite being a NiceGuy, stands up to Fanny only when his fling Mary Crawford is not concerned. Mary herself is a more clear-cut example, since her answer to her brother's tentative of attracting Fanny's affection to leave her sighing and depressed like her cousins is basically a cross between ThatMakesMeFeelAngry and "whatever, anyway I told you so and it's not my business."
* AllGirlsWantBadBoys: Maria and Julia both fall too hard for Henry Crawford to hate him for manipulating them both and instead just become jealous of each other. Fanny Price Snr. seems to have fallen prey to this when she married Lt Price, which could be why Fanny doesn't want to repeat the mistake with Crawford, even if the financial difficulties don't apply.

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* AccompliceByInaction: Edmund, despite being a NiceGuy, stands up to for Fanny only when his fling Mary Crawford is not concerned. Mary herself is a more clear-cut example, since her answer to her brother's tentative efforts of attracting Fanny's affection to leave her sighing and depressed like her cousins is basically a cross between ThatMakesMeFeelAngry and "whatever, anyway I told you so and it's not my business."
* AllGirlsWantBadBoys: Maria and Julia both fall too hard for Henry Crawford to hate him for manipulating them both and instead just become jealous of each other. Fanny Price Snr. seems to have fallen prey to this when she married Lt Lt. Price, which could be why Fanny doesn't want to repeat the mistake with Crawford, even if the financial difficulties don't apply.



* AllLovingHero: Fanny consistently cares and worries about everyone's wellbeing, no matter if they have been horrible towards her or not. Despite how she feels about Edmund, she constantly does whatever she can to help both him and Mary Crawford, even if it leads to her own unhappiness, and she even feels bad about being afraid of Sir Thomas. In fact, when the play is being rehearsed and Julia is excluded, Fanny is the only one who worries about her at all, ''constantly'' concerned for her, and the only reason why she doesn't go to help her is because she thinks that she would be presuming too much importance in her own actions. Of course, the fact that everyone has become so adjusted to her acting this way is why it is such a huge shock when she [[spoiler: rejects Henry's proposal]] - it turns out that Fanny is actually quite capable of holding negative opinions of people, even if she doesn't show them.

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* AllLovingHero: Fanny consistently cares and worries about everyone's wellbeing, no matter well-being, even if they have been horrible towards her or not.to her. Despite how she feels about Edmund, she constantly does whatever she can to help both him and Mary Crawford, even if it leads to her own unhappiness, and she even feels bad about being afraid of Sir Thomas. In fact, when the play is being rehearsed and Julia is excluded, Fanny is the only one who worries about her at all, ''constantly'' concerned for her, and the only reason why she doesn't go to help her is because she thinks that she would be presuming too much importance in her own actions. Of course, the fact that everyone has become so adjusted used to her acting this way is why it is such a huge shock when she [[spoiler: rejects Henry's proposal]] - it turns out that Fanny is actually quite capable of holding negative opinions of people, even if she doesn't show them.



** Mary Crawford. From self-centred and [[DracoInLeatherPants elegant]] AntiVillain, GoldDigger for Edmund TrueCompanions with Fanny and SpiritedYoungLady to StupidEvil with a VillainousCrush and a FalseFriend.
** Tom Bertram goes from a [[ItsAllAboutMe self-involved]] irresponsible party animal to a resposible big brother with a GuiltComplex.

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** Mary Crawford. From self-centred self-centered and [[DracoInLeatherPants elegant]] AntiVillain, GoldDigger for Edmund TrueCompanions with Fanny and SpiritedYoungLady to StupidEvil with a VillainousCrush and a FalseFriend.
** Tom Bertram goes from a [[ItsAllAboutMe self-involved]] irresponsible party animal to a resposible responsible big brother with a GuiltComplex.



** Edmund (Archie), Fanny (Betty), Mary Crawford (Veronica);
** Or ''Fanny'' is the Veronica. Yes, you read this well. She refuses to advantage her family with a marriage of convenience, throws a proto-feminist speech to the head of her love interest, and is perfectly sure that she can be right over men. Mary complies to most of society's standards, and ends up thinking of compromising herself and wangsting a lot. This can be argued to be a case of BettyAndVeronicaSwitch, as they weren't like this at the beginning of the novel.
** Fanny (Archie), Edmund (Betty), Henry Crawford (Veronica);
** Henry (Archie), Fanny (Betty) and Maria Bertram (Veronica);
** Maria (Archie), Mr. Rushworth (Betty), Henry (Veronica).
* BookDumb: Fanny, when she first arrives at Mansfield Park, she knows very little about the arts or humanities. All she knows about are dumb things like how to help keep a house, how to look after babies, how to manage and educate younger kids, &c... Sadly for her, her two cousins (and the governess) are exactly the opposite. They're terribly accomplished, but so Life Dumb they don't know the difference between 'uneducated' and 'stupid', and, despite not being naturally mean, are spectacularly emotionally illiterate. Fanny makes up for lost time later, at least in theology and philosophy, with Edmund's help; but, because their confidence was built up too high, Maria and Julia never gain any wisdom until it's far too late.

to:

** Edmund (Archie), Fanny (Betty), Mary Crawford (Veronica);
**
(Veronica)
***
Or ''Fanny'' is the Veronica. Yes, you read this well.right. She refuses to advantage her family with a marriage of convenience, throws a proto-feminist speech to the head of her love interest, and is perfectly sure that she can be right over men. Mary complies to most of society's standards, and ends up thinking of compromising herself and wangsting a lot. This can be argued to be a case of BettyAndVeronicaSwitch, as they weren't like this at the beginning of the novel.
** Fanny (Archie), Edmund (Betty), Henry Crawford (Veronica);
(Veronica)
** Henry (Archie), Fanny (Betty) and Maria Bertram (Veronica);
(Veronica)
** Maria (Archie), Mr. Rushworth (Betty), Henry (Veronica).
(Veronica)
* BookDumb: Fanny, when she first arrives at Mansfield Park, she knows very little about the arts or humanities. All she knows about are dumb "dumb" things like how to help keep a house, how to look after babies, how to manage and educate younger kids, &c... Sadly for her, her two cousins (and the governess) are exactly the opposite. They're terribly accomplished, but so Life Dumb they don't know the difference between 'uneducated' and 'stupid', and, despite not being naturally mean, are spectacularly emotionally illiterate. Fanny makes up for lost time later, at least in theology and philosophy, with Edmund's help; but, because their confidence was built up too high, Maria and Julia never gain any wisdom until it's far too late.



* CharacterDevelopment: Fanny starts to stand up for herself and take the initiative (such as when she helps her sister Susan with her problem with Betsy), Edmund's eyes are opened to the real Mary Crawford, and Sir Thomas experiences the typical Creator/JaneAusten Rude-Awakening-and-Painful-Disillusionment.

to:

* CharacterDevelopment: Fanny starts to stand up for herself and take the initiative (such as when she helps her sister Susan with her problem with Betsy), Betsey), Edmund's eyes are opened to the real Mary Crawford, and Sir Thomas experiences the typical Creator/JaneAusten Rude-Awakening-and-Painful-Disillusionment.



* ClusterFBomb: Mr. Price's constant use of the phrase "By God!" is treated like this thanks to the period it was written in. (It's studiously rendered as "By G--" in the text.) Fanny is very embarrassed by this.
* CreatorsApathy: [[invoked]] The cast of ''Lover's Vows'', with the exception of Mr. Yates, is concerned with the flirtations and betrayals which occur under cover of "rehearsals," rather than any serious attempt to produce the play.
* DancesAndBalls: Many of them. Maria and Julia frequent assembly balls and Mrs. Norris chaperones them, and Maria and Mr. Rushworth meet at one of them and they continue their courtship phase there as well. One impromptu small ball happens on Mansfield, and finally, Sir Thomas organizes a splendid ball in Fanny's honour - as her introduction into society, to please her and her brother and perhaps even to help Mr. Crawford to court Fanny.
* DarkerAndEdgier: Was supposed to be this to ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice''. Was also supposed to be not about marriage at all, but ordination; that was the intention, anyway.
* DerailingLoveInterests: Edmund is generally a better person than Henry Crawford throughout the novel, but when Henry [[spoiler: runs off with Maria]], this seems substantially worse than anything we've seen from him so far. Some readers see it as Austen's attempt to justify Fanny's decision, while others see consistent moral development of character. A lot of scholars see his escape with Maria Bertram in the Rushworths's garden as a premise of elopement, or a sexual intercourse. It symbolizes, at least, his willingness to ''almost'' help cheating on Maria's fiance.
* DidYouThinkICannotFeel: Fanny after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and that marrying him would be a terrible idea.

to:

* ClusterFBomb: Mr. Price's constant use of the phrase "By God!" is treated like this thanks this, due to the period in which it was written in.written. (It's studiously rendered as "By G--" in the text.) Fanny is very embarrassed by this.
* CreatorsApathy: [[invoked]] The cast of ''Lover's Vows'', with the exception of Mr. Yates, is more concerned with the flirtations and betrayals which occur under cover of "rehearsals," rather than with any serious attempt to produce the play.
* DancesAndBalls: Many of them. Maria and Julia frequent frequently attend assembly balls and Mrs. Norris chaperones them, and Maria and Mr. Rushworth meet at one of them and they continue their courtship phase there as well. One impromptu small ball happens on at Mansfield, and finally, Sir Thomas organizes a splendid ball in Fanny's honour - as her introduction into society, to please her and her brother and perhaps even to help Mr. Crawford to court Fanny.
* DarkerAndEdgier: Was The book supposed to be this to ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice''. Was It was also supposed to be not about marriage at all, but ordination; that was the intention, anyway.
* DerailingLoveInterests: Edmund is generally a better person than Henry Crawford throughout the novel, but when Henry [[spoiler: runs off with Maria]], this seems substantially worse than anything we've seen from him so far. Some readers see it as Austen's attempt to justify Fanny's decision, while others see consistent moral development of character. A lot of scholars see his escape with Maria Bertram in the Rushworths's garden as a premise of elopement, or a sexual intercourse. It symbolizes, at least, his willingness to ''almost'' help cheating Maria cheat on Maria's fiance.
her fiancé.
* DidYouThinkICannotFeel: Fanny Fanny, after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and that marrying him would be a terrible idea.



* EmotionlessGirl: Fanny as a survival mechanism. Compare Elinor in ''Literature/SenseAndSensibility'', Anne in ''Literature/{{Persuasion}}'', and Georgiana Darcy in ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice'' -- all mortifyingly shy, very affectionate to all, always trying to accommodate everyone's demands as much as they can, all looking up to an older kind male figure to whom they are related by blood (with said male having been their only friend for many years and having taught them all they know), and, to top it off, all having lonely childhoods with no friends of their own ages and used to using silence and emotionlessness to cope with difficult situations.

to:

* EmotionlessGirl: Fanny as a survival mechanism. Compare Elinor in ''Literature/SenseAndSensibility'', Anne in ''Literature/{{Persuasion}}'', and Georgiana Darcy in ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice'' -- all mortifyingly incredibly shy, very affectionate to all, those whom they love, always trying to accommodate everyone's demands as much as they can, all looking up to an older kind male figure to whom they are related by blood (with said male having been their only friend for many years and having taught them all they know), and, to top it off, all having lonely childhoods with no friends of their own ages and used to using silence and emotionlessness an emotionless facade to cope with difficult situations.



** Poor Fanny sure gets "knocked up" a lot, not to mention all the "intercourse" and Henry Crawford "making love" to her. Also, when Henry Crawford is discussing with his sister the possibility of seducing Fanny, one of his questions about her is "Is she queer?"

to:

** Poor Fanny sure gets "knocked up" a lot, not to mention all the "intercourse" and Henry Crawford "making love" to her. Also, when Henry Crawford is discussing with his sister the possibility of seducing Fanny, one of his questions about her is is, "Is she queer?"



** {{Lampshaded}} inversion in Mary's case -- see ItsAllAboutMe.
** Played straight in Fanny's case -- her objection to Edmund choosing Mary Crawford is less because she won't get him (though that's not nothing) and more because of who Mary is. When it gets closer to Edmund's anticipated proposal, Fanny's fretting is over the fact that ''Edmund'' would be unhappy when he discovers Mary's true character.

to:

** {{Lampshaded}} inversion in Mary's case -- - see ItsAllAboutMe.
** Played straight in Fanny's case -- case; her objection to Edmund choosing Mary Crawford is less because she won't get him herself (though that's not nothing) and more because of who Mary is. When it gets closer to Edmund's anticipated proposal, Fanny's fretting is over the fact that ''Edmund'' would be unhappy when he discovers Mary's true character.



** Edmund's blindness to Miss Crawford's true nature can no longer hold up when [[spoiler:Fanny tells him of the letter she received when his brother was ill, featuring a stealth hope that he would die and make Edmund the heir of Mansfield Park, and therefore rich enough for her]].

to:

** Edmund's blindness to Miss Crawford's true nature can no longer hold up when [[spoiler:Fanny tells him of the letter she received when his brother was ill, featuring a stealth hope that he Tom would die and make Edmund the heir of Mansfield Park, and therefore rich enough for her]].



* KissingCousins: Mrs. Norris worries about this when she first brings Fanny to Mansfield Park, although not because it was wrong to marry your cousin, but because she didn't want Tom or Edmund marrying "below their station." [[spoiler: It turns out her worries were well-founded, since Edmund and Fanny end up together.]]
* ALadyOnEachArm: Henry Crawford with Maria and Julia. Later, when he visits Portsmouth, he repeats it with Fanny and her sister Susan -- though in that case, Susan's presence [[ThirdWheel certainly wasn't his idea.]]

to:

* KissingCousins: Mrs. Norris worries about this when she first brings Fanny to Mansfield Park, although Park - not because it was wrong to marry your cousin, but because she didn't want Tom or Edmund marrying "below their station." [[spoiler: It turns out her worries were well-founded, since Edmund and Fanny end up together.]]
* ALadyOnEachArm: Henry Crawford with Maria and Julia. Later, when he visits Portsmouth, he repeats it with Fanny and her sister Susan -- though (though in that case, Susan's presence [[ThirdWheel certainly wasn't his idea.]] idea]]).



** Mrs. Norris has spent a lifetime bullying Fanny, making her feel useless while spoiling her nieces Maria and Julia rotten. [[spoiler:Come the end, she's moved in with a disgraced Maria to take care of her for the rest of her life and has to live with her mistakes.]]

to:

** Mrs. Norris has spent a lifetime bullying Fanny, making her feel useless while spoiling her other nieces Maria and Julia rotten. [[spoiler:Come the end, she's moved in with a disgraced Maria to take care of her for the rest of her life and has to live with her mistakes.]]



** The narrator states outright in the last few chapters that if Henry Crawford had not [[spoiler:felt the need to conquer Maria's affections again]], he would have ultimately won [[spoiler: Fanny's]] heart and hand.

to:

** The narrator states outright in the last few chapters that if Henry Crawford had not [[spoiler:felt the need to conquer Maria's affections again]], he would have ultimately won [[spoiler: Fanny's]] [[spoiler:won Fanny's heart and hand.hand]].



* NoAccountingForTaste: The Bertrams and the Rushworths--Sir Thomas' wife is lazy and unintelligent, and Mr. Rushworth is rather dim as well. Paradoxically, the Bertrams seem to be HappilyMarried at the same time.

to:

* NoAccountingForTaste: The Bertrams and the Rushworths--Sir Rushworths; Sir Thomas' wife is lazy and unintelligent, and Mr. Rushworth is rather dim as well. Paradoxically, the Bertrams seem to be HappilyMarried at the same time.time, as it's made clear in a few scenes that they really care about each other.



** In the Price household, we see that Mrs. Price values her sons over her daughters. Her eldest, William, is her favourite, yet luckily it didn't spoil him. Little Betsy is the only daughter that Mrs Price likes and she spoils her horribly. Poor Susan is TheUnfavourite for being a girl and not the youngest cutest child, and lashes out a lot as a result. Fanny helps her deal with it, and is eventually able to bring her back to Mansfield Park to get away from it.

to:

** In the Price household, we see that Mrs. Price values her sons over her daughters. Her eldest, William, is her favourite, yet luckily it didn't spoil him. Little Betsy Betsey is the only daughter that Mrs Price likes and she spoils her horribly. Poor Susan is TheUnfavourite for being a girl and but not the youngest cutest child, and lashes out a lot as a result. Fanny helps her deal with it, and is eventually able allowed to bring her back to Mansfield Park to get Park, which gets her away from it.it and makes her very happy.



** Fanny, as the eldest, had to help her mother out a lot before she was adopted.

to:

** Fanny, as the eldest, eldest daughter, had to help her mother out a lot before she was adopted.



* ShesAllGrownUp: Fanny gets this from all the ''nice'' members of her family, and Henry Crawford, who all eventually notice that while Maria and Julia were taking center-stage, particularly with their jealous fighting over Henry Crawford, Fanny grew up, and she only needed [[BeautifulAllAlong a little more confidence and a new dress]] to bring this to their attention. Of course, Mrs. Norris tries ''[[UpToEleven even harder]]'' to tear her down after she realises this.

to:

* ShesAllGrownUp: Fanny gets this from all the ''nice'' members of her family, and Henry Crawford, who all eventually notice that while Maria and Julia were taking center-stage, center stage, particularly with their jealous fighting over Henry Crawford, Fanny grew up, and she only needed [[BeautifulAllAlong a little more confidence and a new dress]] to bring this to their attention. Of course, Mrs. Norris tries ''[[UpToEleven even harder]]'' to tear her down after she realises this.



** Mrs. Norris boasts that it was she who made the match between her darling Maria and Mr Rushworth. She also ships Julia and Henry.

to:

** Mrs. Norris boasts that it was she who made the match between her darling Maria and Mr Mr. Rushworth. She also ships Julia and Henry.



** Toward the end of the book, [[spoiler:Sir Thomas is an ardent shipper of Edmund and Fanny; not only does he observe that she's the one helping Edmund get past his broken heart, but also he has come to realize how much he himself loves and values her, and would like nothing better than to be able to call her his daughter.]]



* [[SilentSnarker Silent]] ServileSnarker: Baddeley when Mrs. Norris tries to insist that Sir Thomas must want ''her'', not Fanny, to come speak to Mr. Crawford.

to:

* [[SilentSnarker Silent]] ServileSnarker: Baddeley Baddeley, when Mrs. Norris tries to insist that Sir Thomas must want ''her'', not Fanny, to come speak to Mr. Crawford.



* SpoiledBrat: The Crawfords and the younger generation of Bertrams, minus Edmund. Betsey Price counts as well because Fanny Price Sr. pampers her so much and lets her get away with everything.

to:

* SpoiledBrat: The Crawfords and the younger generation of Bertrams, minus Edmund. Betsey Price counts as well well, because Fanny Price Sr. pampers her so much and lets her get away with everything.



* YouGoGirl: Fanny calls out society (and by association everyone who's pressuring her to accept Henry Crawford's proposal) on the DoubleStandard of women being expected to cater to the whim of ''any'' suitor that comes along, no matter how he's treated her before. She rightly points out that, if she ''had'' actually taken Henry's behaviour as proof that he was interested in marrying her, she would have been maligned by her own gender for it and accused of getting ideas above her station. In stark contrast, ''' ''his'' ''' out-of-the-blue decision to propose is received by everyone as something extremely lucky for her, with no one taking her feelings into consideration. It shows up the sheer inequality that women were forced to abide by back in this era, condemning the act of any woman putting up with abuse just because her prospective partner is rich, and criticizing a society that could possibly favour said inequality. For the 1800s, her speech is pretty FairForItsDay, and you're not going to find anything closer to feminism until Creator/AnneBronte's ''Literature/TheTenantOfWildfellHall'' and Charlotte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' came on the scene. [[note]]Not in respectable fiction, anyway (nothing written by Lady Woolstonecroft or Aphra Benn really goes into that genre). Well, apart from Richardson's 'Clarissa'. And then some of Shakespeare's characters...[[/note]]

to:

* YouGoGirl: Fanny calls out society (and by association everyone who's pressuring her to accept Henry Crawford's proposal) on the DoubleStandard of women being expected to cater to the whim of ''any'' suitor that comes along, no matter how he's treated her before. She rightly points out that, if she ''had'' actually taken Henry's behaviour as proof that he was interested in marrying her, she would have been maligned by her own gender for it and accused of getting ideas above her station. In stark contrast, ''' ''his'' ''' out-of-the-blue decision to propose is received by everyone as something extremely lucky for her, with no one taking her feelings into consideration. It shows up the sheer inequality that women were forced to abide by back in this era, condemning the act of any woman putting up with abuse just because her prospective partner is rich, and criticizing a society that could possibly favour said inequality. For the 1800s, her speech is pretty FairForItsDay, and you're not going to find anything closer to feminism until Creator/AnneBronte's ''Literature/TheTenantOfWildfellHall'' and Charlotte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' came on the scene. [[note]]Not in respectable fiction, anyway (nothing written by Lady Woolstonecroft Wollstonecraft or Aphra Benn really goes into that genre). Well, apart from Richardson's 'Clarissa'. And then some of Shakespeare's characters...[[/note]]



* ZanyScheme: Mr. Yates wants to redo a cancelled amateur play with his new pals at Mansfield. First they have to decide on a script; since they're a bunch of spoiled rich kids, they need one where every character is the "best part". Half the group insists on a tragedy, the other on a comedy. Their production plan goes from a family amusement in one room to grand schemes of building a fully-dressed and appropriating the absent Sir Thomas' own bedchamber as their green room. And as for the play they finally settle on: it's ''Lover's Vows'', which they use as an excuse to flirt inappropriately with each other.

to:

* ZanyScheme: Mr. Yates wants to redo a cancelled amateur play with his new pals at Mansfield. First they have to decide on a script; since they're a bunch of spoiled rich kids, they need one where every character is the "best part". Half the group insists on a tragedy, the other on a comedy. Their production plan goes from a family amusement in one room to grand schemes of building a fully-dressed set and appropriating the absent Sir Thomas' own bedchamber as their green room. And as for the play they finally settle on: it's ''Lover's Vows'', which they use as an excuse to flirt inappropriately with each other.
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