History Literature / MansfieldPark

26th Aug '16 12:03:27 AM LadyNorbert
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* BreakTheCutie: Fanny... ''the entire book''

to:

* BreakTheCutie: Fanny... ''the entire book''book.''



* DidYouThinkICannotFeel: Fanny after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and that marrying him would be a terrible idea.



* DoYouThinkICannotFeel: Fanny after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and that marrying him would be a terrible idea.



* LovingAShadow: Edmund towards Miss Crawford

to:

* LovingAShadow: Edmund towards Miss CrawfordCrawford.



* SirSwearsALot Lt. Price. D__ surprising for some Austen readers, but he d___ well comes as close as she would have been allowed to. (It's alleged that religious swears in this period were ''more'' offensive than sexual swears, although obviously these things are hard to quantify.)

to:

* SirSwearsALot Lt. Price. D__ surprising for some Austen readers, but he d___ well comes as close as she would have been allowed to.allowed. (It's alleged that religious swears in this period were ''more'' offensive than sexual swears, although obviously these things are hard to quantify.)



* ZanyScheme: Mr. Yates wants to redo a cancelled amateur play with his new pals at Mansfield. First they have to decide on a script--since they're a bunch of spoiled rich kids, they need one where every character is the "best part". Half the group insists on a tragedy, the other on a comedy. Their production plan goes from a family amusement in one room to grand schemes of building a fully-dressed and appropriating the absent Sir Thomas' own bedchamber as their green room. And as for the play they finally settle on: it's ''Lover's Vows'', which they use as an excuse to flirt inappropriately with each other.

to:

* ZanyScheme: Mr. Yates wants to redo a cancelled amateur play with his new pals at Mansfield. First they have to decide on a script--since script; since they're a bunch of spoiled rich kids, they need one where every character is the "best part". Half the group insists on a tragedy, the other on a comedy. Their production plan goes from a family amusement in one room to grand schemes of building a fully-dressed and appropriating the absent Sir Thomas' own bedchamber as their green room. And as for the play they finally settle on: it's ''Lover's Vows'', which they use as an excuse to flirt inappropriately with each other.
25th Aug '16 11:58:06 PM LadyNorbert
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* {{BookDumb}}: Fanny, when she first arrives at Mansfield Park, she knows very little about the arts or humanities. All she knows about are dumb things like how to help keep a house, how to look after babies, how to manage and educate younger kids, &c... Sadly for her, her two cousins (and the governess) are exactly the opposite. They're terribly accomplished, but so Life Dumb they don't know the difference between 'uneducated' and 'stupid', and, despite not being naturally mean, are spectacularly emotionally illiterate. Fanny makes up for lost time later, at least in theology and philosophy, with Edmund's help; but, because their confidence was built up too high, Maria and Julia never gain any wisdom until it's far too late.

to:

* {{BookDumb}}: BookDumb: Fanny, when she first arrives at Mansfield Park, she knows very little about the arts or humanities. All she knows about are dumb things like how to help keep a house, how to look after babies, how to manage and educate younger kids, &c... Sadly for her, her two cousins (and the governess) are exactly the opposite. They're terribly accomplished, but so Life Dumb they don't know the difference between 'uneducated' and 'stupid', and, despite not being naturally mean, are spectacularly emotionally illiterate. Fanny makes up for lost time later, at least in theology and philosophy, with Edmund's help; but, because their confidence was built up too high, Maria and Julia never gain any wisdom until it's far too late.
13th Aug '16 8:44:27 PM LadyNorbert
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* ALadyOnEachArm: Henry Crawford with Maria and Julia. Later, when he visits Portsmouth, he repeats it with Fanny and her sister Susan -- though in that case, Susan's presence [[ThirdWheel certainly wasn't his idea.]]



* ALadyOnEachArm: Henry Crawford with Maria and Julia. Later, when he visits Portsmouth, he repeats it with Fanny and her sister Susan -- though in that case, Susan's presence [[ThirdWheel certainly wasn't his idea.]]



** In the Bertram household, Mrs Norris indulges all the Bertram siblings, but she greatly prefers Maria and Tom. Maria is her particular darling. She doesn't care about Edmund much and openly abuses Fanny to elevate Maria and Julia. Sir Thomas is strict with everybody and Lady Bertram can't be bothered to care about her children.
** In the Price household, we see that Mrs Price values her sons over her daughters. Her eldest William is her favourite, yet luckily it didn't spoil him. Little Betsy is the only daughter that Mrs Price likes and she spoils her horribly. Poor Susan is TheUnfavourite for being a girl and not the youngest cutest child, and lashes out a lot as a result. Fanny helps her deal with it and ultimately has her move to Mansfield Park.
* PrincessForADay: Fanny at her coming-out ball, and to a lesser extent, this is basically how she is treated whenever Maria and Julia are not at Mansfield.

to:

** In the Bertram household, Mrs Mrs. Norris indulges all the Bertram siblings, but she greatly prefers Maria and Tom. Maria is her particular darling. She doesn't care about Edmund much and openly abuses Fanny to elevate Maria and Julia. Sir Thomas is strict with everybody and Lady Bertram can't be bothered to care about her children.
** In the Price household, we see that Mrs Mrs. Price values her sons over her daughters. Her eldest William eldest, William, is her favourite, yet luckily it didn't spoil him. Little Betsy is the only daughter that Mrs Price likes and she spoils her horribly. Poor Susan is TheUnfavourite for being a girl and not the youngest cutest child, and lashes out a lot as a result. Fanny helps her deal with it it, and ultimately has is eventually able to bring her move back to Mansfield Park.
Park to get away from it.
* PrincessForADay: Fanny at her coming-out ball, and coming out ball; to a lesser extent, this is basically how she is treated whenever Maria and Julia are not at Mansfield.



** Fanny as the eldest had to help her mother out a lot before she was adopted.
** Edmund while his father is away.
%%* ThePlace

to:

** Fanny Fanny, as the eldest eldest, had to help her mother out a lot before she was adopted.
** Edmund Edmund, while his father is away.
%%* ThePlace* ThePlace: The book is named after the marvelous estate where most of the story takes place.



* RightInFrontOfMe: Miss Crawford mocking the clergy to Edmund right before Julia reveals that as his chosen profession.
* RichBitch: Mary Crawford, but Maria Bertram even moreso. Although Julia can still give both of them a run for their money when she decides to ''really'' dig deep and pull out the claws.

to:

* RightInFrontOfMe: Miss Crawford mocking the clergy to Edmund right before Julia reveals that as it's his chosen profession.
* RichBitch: Mary Crawford, but Maria Bertram even moreso. Although more so. Julia can still give both of them a run for their money when she decides to ''really'' dig deep and pull out the claws.



* SheepInSheepsClothing: Fanny is this in-universe. Part of what makes Sir Thomas's Breaking Speech so heart-wrenching is that ''she even starts believing it herself'', and many people start re-assessing their opinion on her, when, as she later states, [[spoiler: refusing to accept Crawford's proposal]] is perfectly understandable no matter how charming and well-liked the Crawfords are in Mansfield, if only because it's her choice, not the Bertrams's.
* ShesAllGrownUp: Fanny gets this from all the ''nice'' members of her family, and Henry Crawford, who all eventually notice that while Maria and Julia were taking centre-stage, particularly with their jealous fighting over Henry Crawford, Fanny grew up, and she only needed [[BeautifulAllAlong a little more confidence and a new dress]] to bring this to their attention. Of course Mrs. Norris tries ''[[UpToEleven even harder]]'' to tear her down after she realises this.

to:

* SheepInSheepsClothing: Fanny is this in-universe. Part of what makes Sir Thomas's Breaking Speech so heart-wrenching is that ''she even starts believing it herself'', and many people start re-assessing their opinion on her, when, as she later states, [[spoiler: refusing to accept Crawford's proposal]] is perfectly understandable no matter how charming and well-liked the Crawfords are in Mansfield, if only because it's her choice, not the Bertrams's.Bertrams'.
* ShesAllGrownUp: Fanny gets this from all the ''nice'' members of her family, and Henry Crawford, who all eventually notice that while Maria and Julia were taking centre-stage, center-stage, particularly with their jealous fighting over Henry Crawford, Fanny grew up, and she only needed [[BeautifulAllAlong a little more confidence and a new dress]] to bring this to their attention. Of course course, Mrs. Norris tries ''[[UpToEleven even harder]]'' to tear her down after she realises this.



** At first, Mrs Grant ships Mary and Tom and Julia and Henry, even before they meet each other as she would just love to have her half-siblings settled near her home.
** Mrs Norris boasts that it was her who made the match between her darling Maria and Mr Rushworth. She also ships Julia and Henry.
** Sir Thomas supports Mary and Edmund as their relationship is openly acknowledged even though there was no formal proposal or engagement.

to:

** At first, Mrs Mrs. Grant ships Mary and Tom and Julia and Henry, even before they meet each other other, as she would just love to have her half-siblings settled near her home.
** Mrs Mrs. Norris boasts that it was her she who made the match between her darling Maria and Mr Rushworth. She also ships Julia and Henry.
** Sir Thomas supports Mary and Edmund as their relationship is openly acknowledged acknowledged, even though there was no formal proposal or engagement.



* SiblingTriangle: Maria and Julia compete for affection of Henry Crawford.
* SiblingYinYang: Tom and Edmund Bertram; Fanny and the more lively, confident Susan Price

to:

* SiblingTriangle: Maria and Julia compete for the affection of Henry Crawford.
* SiblingYinYang: Tom and Edmund Bertram; Fanny and the more lively, confident Susan PricePrice.



* SpoiledBrat: the Crawfords and the younger generation of Bertrams, minus Edmund. Betsey Price counts as well because Fanny Price Sr. pampers her so much and lets her get away with everything.

to:

* SpoiledBrat: the The Crawfords and the younger generation of Bertrams, minus Edmund. Betsey Price counts as well because Fanny Price Sr. pampers her so much and lets her get away with everything.



* TheUnfavorite: Fanny. She was The Unfavorite for her mother before she got to Mansfield and she's Mrs Norris's least favorite niece at Mansfield.

to:

* TheUnfavorite: Fanny. She was The Unfavorite for her mother before she got to Mansfield Mansfield, and she's Mrs Mrs. Norris's least favorite niece at Mansfield.



* WickedStepmother: Mrs. Norris is Fanny's aunt but otherwise fits the trope dead on. Considering that it was her idea in the first place to "adopt" Fanny, this comes very close to actually happening. Fanny's only saved by it because Mrs. Norris was too selfish to want to take even rudimentary care of her niece.

to:

* WickedStepmother: Mrs. Norris is Fanny's aunt aunt, but otherwise fits the trope dead on. Considering that it was her idea in the first place to "adopt" Fanny, this comes very close to actually happening. Fanny's only saved by it because Mrs. Norris was too selfish to want to take even rudimentary care of her niece.



* YouGoGirl: Fanny calls out society (and by association everyone who's pressuring her to accept Henry Crawford's proposal) on the DoubleStandard of women being expected to cater to the whim of ''any'' suitor that comes along, no matter how he's treated her before. She rightly points out that, if she ''had'' actually taken Henry's behaviour as proof that he was interested in marrying her, she would have been maligned by her own gender for it and accused of getting ideas above her station. In stark contrast, ''' ''his'' ''' out-of-the-blue decision to propose is received by everyone as something extremely lucky for her, with no one taking her own feelings into consideration. It shows up the sheer inequality that women were forced to abide by back in this era, condemning the act of any woman putting up with abuse just because her prospective partner is rich, and criticizing a society that could possibly favour said inequality. For the 1800s, her speech is pretty FairForItsDay, and you're not going to find anything closer to feminism until Creator/AnneBronte's ''Literature/TheTenantOfWildfellHall'' and Charlotte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' came on the scene. [[note]]Not in respectable fiction, anyway (nothing written by Lady Woolstonecroft or Aphra Benn really goes into that genre). Well, apart from Richardson's 'Clarissa'. And then some of Shakespeare's characters...[[/note]]

to:

* YouGoGirl: Fanny calls out society (and by association everyone who's pressuring her to accept Henry Crawford's proposal) on the DoubleStandard of women being expected to cater to the whim of ''any'' suitor that comes along, no matter how he's treated her before. She rightly points out that, if she ''had'' actually taken Henry's behaviour as proof that he was interested in marrying her, she would have been maligned by her own gender for it and accused of getting ideas above her station. In stark contrast, ''' ''his'' ''' out-of-the-blue decision to propose is received by everyone as something extremely lucky for her, with no one taking her own feelings into consideration. It shows up the sheer inequality that women were forced to abide by back in this era, condemning the act of any woman putting up with abuse just because her prospective partner is rich, and criticizing a society that could possibly favour said inequality. For the 1800s, her speech is pretty FairForItsDay, and you're not going to find anything closer to feminism until Creator/AnneBronte's ''Literature/TheTenantOfWildfellHall'' and Charlotte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' came on the scene. [[note]]Not in respectable fiction, anyway (nothing written by Lady Woolstonecroft or Aphra Benn really goes into that genre). Well, apart from Richardson's 'Clarissa'. And then some of Shakespeare's characters...[[/note]]



* ZanyScheme: Mr. Yates wants to redo a cancelled amateur play with his new pals at Mansfield. First they have to decide on a script--since they're a bunch of spoiled rich kids, they need one where every character is the "best part". Half the group insists on a tragedy, the other on a comedy. Their production plan goes from a family amusement in one room to grand schemes of building a fully-dressed and appropriating the absent Sir Thomas' own bedchamber as their green room. And as for the play they finally settle on: it's "Lover's Vows", which they use as an excuse to flirt inappropriately with each other.

to:

* ZanyScheme: Mr. Yates wants to redo a cancelled amateur play with his new pals at Mansfield. First they have to decide on a script--since they're a bunch of spoiled rich kids, they need one where every character is the "best part". Half the group insists on a tragedy, the other on a comedy. Their production plan goes from a family amusement in one room to grand schemes of building a fully-dressed and appropriating the absent Sir Thomas' own bedchamber as their green room. And as for the play they finally settle on: it's "Lover's Vows", ''Lover's Vows'', which they use as an excuse to flirt inappropriately with each other.
14th Jun '16 1:06:04 AM PaulA
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Added DiffLines:

* AccompliceByInaction: Edmund, despite being a NiceGuy, stands up to Fanny only when his fling Mary Crawford is not concerned. Mary herself is a more clear-cut example, since her answer to her brother's tentative of attracting Fanny's affection to leave her sighing and depressed like her cousins is basically a cross between ThatMakesMeFeelAngry and "whatever, anyway I told you so and it's not my business."


Added DiffLines:

* WrongGuyFirst: Edmund has to get burned by Mary Crawford before he recognises Fanny's worth and Fanny is almost tempted away from Edmund, her first love, by Mary's brother Henry.
12th Jun '16 2:12:57 PM Ciara25
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* SilkHidingSteel: Fanny, to everyone's surprise. She may be a child abuse victim and an EmotionlessGirl, but she ''does'' have a level head on his shoulders.

to:

* SilkHidingSteel: Fanny, to everyone's surprise. She may be a child abuse victim and an EmotionlessGirl, but she ''does'' have a level head on her shoulders, recognises that marriage to Henry would be terrible, and repeatedly refuses his shoulders.suit.
27th May '16 3:54:34 PM Jayalaw
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* DoYouThinkICannotFeel: Fanny after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and

to:

* DoYouThinkICannotFeel: Fanny after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and that marrying him would be a terrible idea.
30th Apr '16 9:59:02 AM Jayalaw
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* DoYouThinkICannotFeel: Fanny after turning down Henry Crawford's proposal and being sent home as a result of it. Not only does she lack feelings for Henry, but she knows what kind of a man he is, and



* KarmaHoudini: Henry Crawford for [[spoiler:disgracing Maria]], though he DidNotGetTheGirl.



* LaserGuidedKarma:
** Mrs. Norris has spent a lifetime bullying Fanny, making her feel useless while spoiling her nieces Maria and Julia rotten. [[spoiler:Come the end, she's moved in with a disgraced Maria to take care of her for the rest of her life and has to live with her mistakes.]]
** Fanny, being kind and virtuous, [[spoiler:marries Edward at the end and finally receives the respect she deserves.]]



* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: Sir Thomas Bertram after [[spoiler:Maria elopes with Henry Crawford, proving Fanny was right to not accept his proposal]] and the family's reputation goes to hell. He immediately dives into MustMakeAmends towards Fanny.



* PromotionToParent: Edmund while his father is away.

to:

* PromotionToParent: PromotionToParent:
** Fanny as the eldest had to help her mother out a lot before she was adopted.
**
Edmund while his father is away.


Added DiffLines:

* SilkHidingSteel: Fanny, to everyone's surprise. She may be a child abuse victim and an EmotionlessGirl, but she ''does'' have a level head on his shoulders.
20th Mar '16 2:52:55 AM Morgenthaler
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* [[BechdelTest Reverse Bechdel Test]]: Has a reputation for being the only Jane Austen novel that depicts conversations between men without women present and about something other than romance. [[note]]Austen claimed she usually steered clear of such scenes because she didn't know how men acted when women weren't around.[[/note]]
12th Mar '16 4:38:33 AM Ciara25
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* YouGoGirl: Fanny calls out society (and by association everyone who's pressuring her to accept Henry Crawford's proposal) on the DoubleStandard of women being expected to cater to the whim of ''any'' suitor that comes along, no matter how he's treated her before. She rightly points out that, if she ''had'' actually taken Henry's behaviour as proof that he was interested in marrying her, she would be maligned by her own gender for it and accused of getting ideas above her station. In stark contrast, ''' ''his'' ''' out-of-the-blue decision to propose is received by everyone as something extremely lucky for her, with no one taking her own feelings into consideration. It shows up the sheer inequality that women were forced to abide by back in the Regency era, condemning the act of any woman putting up with abuse just because her prospective partner is rich, and criticizing a society that could possibly favour said inequality. For the 1800s, her speech is pretty FairForItsDay, and you're not going to find anything closer to feminism until Creator/AnneBronte's ''Literature/TheTenantOfWildfellHall'' and Charlotte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' came on the scene. [[note]]Not in respectable fiction, anyway (nothing written by Lady Woolstonecroft or Aphra Benn really goes into that genre). Well, apart from Richardson's 'Clarissa'. And then some of Shakespeare's characters...[[/note]]

to:

* YouGoGirl: Fanny calls out society (and by association everyone who's pressuring her to accept Henry Crawford's proposal) on the DoubleStandard of women being expected to cater to the whim of ''any'' suitor that comes along, no matter how he's treated her before. She rightly points out that, if she ''had'' actually taken Henry's behaviour as proof that he was interested in marrying her, she would be have been maligned by her own gender for it and accused of getting ideas above her station. In stark contrast, ''' ''his'' ''' out-of-the-blue decision to propose is received by everyone as something extremely lucky for her, with no one taking her own feelings into consideration. It shows up the sheer inequality that women were forced to abide by back in the Regency this era, condemning the act of any woman putting up with abuse just because her prospective partner is rich, and criticizing a society that could possibly favour said inequality. For the 1800s, her speech is pretty FairForItsDay, and you're not going to find anything closer to feminism until Creator/AnneBronte's ''Literature/TheTenantOfWildfellHall'' and Charlotte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' came on the scene. [[note]]Not in respectable fiction, anyway (nothing written by Lady Woolstonecroft or Aphra Benn really goes into that genre). Well, apart from Richardson's 'Clarissa'. And then some of Shakespeare's characters...[[/note]]
30th Jan '16 4:06:46 PM Ciara25
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* YouGoGirl: Fanny calls out society (and by association everyone who's pressuring her to accept Henry Crawford's proposal) on the DoubleStandard of women being expected to cater to the whim of ''any'' suitor that comes along, no matter how he's treated her before. She rightly points out that, if she ''had'' actually taken Henry's previous behaviour towards her as proof that he was interested in marrying her, she would be maligned by her own gender for it and accused of getting ideas above her station. In stark contrast, ''' ''his'' ''' out-of-the-blue decision to propose is received by everyone as something extremely lucky for her, with no one taking her own feelings into consideration. It shows up the sheer inequality that women were forced to abide by back in the Regency era, condemning the act of any woman putting up with abuse just because her prospective partner is rich, and criticizing a society that could possibly favour said inequality. For the 1800s, her speech is pretty FairForItsDay, and you're not going to find anything closer to feminism until Creator/AnneBronte's ''Literature/TheTenantOfWildfellHall'' and Charlotte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' came on the scene. [[note]]Not in respectable fiction, anyway (nothing written by Lady Woolstonecroft or Aphra Benn really goes into that genre). Well, apart from Richardson's 'Clarissa'. And then some of Shakespeare's characters...[[/note]]

to:

* YouGoGirl: Fanny calls out society (and by association everyone who's pressuring her to accept Henry Crawford's proposal) on the DoubleStandard of women being expected to cater to the whim of ''any'' suitor that comes along, no matter how he's treated her before. She rightly points out that, if she ''had'' actually taken Henry's previous behaviour towards her as proof that he was interested in marrying her, she would be maligned by her own gender for it and accused of getting ideas above her station. In stark contrast, ''' ''his'' ''' out-of-the-blue decision to propose is received by everyone as something extremely lucky for her, with no one taking her own feelings into consideration. It shows up the sheer inequality that women were forced to abide by back in the Regency era, condemning the act of any woman putting up with abuse just because her prospective partner is rich, and criticizing a society that could possibly favour said inequality. For the 1800s, her speech is pretty FairForItsDay, and you're not going to find anything closer to feminism until Creator/AnneBronte's ''Literature/TheTenantOfWildfellHall'' and Charlotte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' came on the scene. [[note]]Not in respectable fiction, anyway (nothing written by Lady Woolstonecroft or Aphra Benn really goes into that genre). Well, apart from Richardson's 'Clarissa'. And then some of Shakespeare's characters...[[/note]]
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