History Literature / LittleHouseOnThePrairie

25th Dec '15 3:41:31 PM RibbonQuest
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Oxford comma
* BookWorm: Caroline, Martha, Mary, Rose and Laura herself.
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* BookWorm: Caroline, Martha, Mary, Rose Rose, and Laura herself.
27th Nov '15 5:14:16 PM Shoebox
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There is some contention about how much of the books are purely Laura Ingalls Wilder: the stories are hers, to be sure, but her daughter was a popular author and was instrumental both in encouraging her mother to publish her story. While Laura already had a background writing columns for local newspapers, some suggest Rose--who was an accomplished ghostwriter--wrote the books herself, while others suggest she merely offered advice and put Laura in touch with her publishing connections; the truth is likely somewhere between the two extremes. A study of the relevant correspondence between the two suggests that Rose's main concern was with the technical details of grammar and style, while her mother focussed on character and plot. While ''The First Four Years'', which was written without Rose's help, is similar in content but noticeably different in style to the rest of the series, this may have more to do with the fact that (in keeping with the steadily increasing reading level of the series as a whole) it was apparently originally intended for a much more adult audience.
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There is some contention about how much of the books are purely Laura Ingalls Wilder: the stories are hers, to be sure, but her daughter was a popular author and was instrumental both in encouraging her mother to publish her story. While Laura already had a background writing columns for local newspapers, some suggest Rose--who was an accomplished ghostwriter--wrote the books herself, while others suggest she merely offered advice and put Laura in touch with her publishing connections; the truth is likely somewhere between the two extremes. A study of the relevant correspondence between the two suggests that Rose's main concern was with the technical details of grammar and style, while her mother focussed on character and plot. \n\n While ''The First Four Years'', which was written without Rose's help, is similar in content but noticeably different in style to the rest of the series, this may have more to do with the fact that (in keeping with the steadily increasing reading level of the series as a whole) it was apparently originally intended for as a much more adult audience. take on the same material.
27th Nov '15 5:11:31 PM Shoebox
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Clarifying the Rose/Laura writing debate a bit.
There is some contention about how much of the books are purely Laura Ingalls Wilder: the stories are hers, to be sure, but her daughter was a popular author and was instrumental in encouraging her mother to publish her story. While Laura already had a background writing columns for local newspapers, some suggest Rose, who was an accomplished ghostwriter, wrote the books herself, while others suggest she merely offered advice and put Laura in touch with her publishing connections; the truth is likely somewhere between the two extremes. Note that ''The First Four Years'', which was written without Rose's help, is similar in content but noticeably different in style to the rest of the series.
to:
There is some contention about how much of the books are purely Laura Ingalls Wilder: the stories are hers, to be sure, but her daughter was a popular author and was instrumental both in encouraging her mother to publish her story. While Laura already had a background writing columns for local newspapers, some suggest Rose, who Rose--who was an accomplished ghostwriter, wrote ghostwriter--wrote the books herself, while others suggest she merely offered advice and put Laura in touch with her publishing connections; the truth is likely somewhere between the two extremes. Note A study of the relevant correspondence between the two suggests that Rose's main concern was with the technical details of grammar and style, while her mother focussed on character and plot. While ''The First Four Years'', which was written without Rose's help, is similar in content but noticeably different in style to the rest of the series. series, this may have more to do with the fact that (in keeping with the steadily increasing reading level of the series as a whole) it was apparently originally intended for a much more adult audience.
26th Nov '15 5:59:36 PM smittykins
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** "There's no great loss without some small gain."
26th Nov '15 1:57:52 PM shamblingdead2
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26th Nov '15 1:56:32 PM shamblingdead2
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Creator/{{Disney}} adapted ''Little House in the Big Woods'' and ''Little House on the Prairie'' into a six-part miniseries in 2005. Carrie was AdaptedOut of the story.
11th Oct '15 10:55:55 AM McJeff
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* BrotherChuck: Unlike Royal and Eliza Jane, Alice neither appears again nor is mentioned after ''Farmer Boy.''

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* BrotherChuck: ChuckCunninghamSyndrome: Unlike Royal and Eliza Jane, Alice neither appears again nor is mentioned after ''Farmer Boy.'' Sadly, Alice's disappearance is probably because she died in Florida at the age of 39.
6th Oct '15 9:24:33 AM hullflyer
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* LoopholeAbuse: In ''On the Banks of Plum Creek'', after being told she and Mary could no longer slide down the haystack, Laura decides that she can still ''roll'' down it. While she doesn't get punished for it--Pa actually has to turn his back so the girls don't see him struggling not to laugh at Laura's perfectly reasonable argument in defense of her loophole--her father does then clarify that she is no longer to even ''touch'' the haystack.
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* LoopholeAbuse: In ''On the Banks of Plum Creek'', after being told she and Mary could no longer slide down the haystack, Laura decides that she can still ''roll'' down it. While she doesn't get punished for it--Pa actually has to turn his back so the girls don't see him [[ActuallyPrettyFunny struggling not to laugh laugh]] at Laura's perfectly reasonable argument in defense of her loophole--her father does then clarify that she is no longer to even ''touch'' the haystack.
22nd Sep '15 1:41:45 PM JoieDeCombat
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It's not true that Laura typically wears red and Mary blue. At most, I seem to recall in the early books there's mention of Laura wearing pink and Mary wearing blue, but it definitely does not hold true as the girls get older.
* RedOniBlueOni: Wild and adventurous Laura typically wears red, while composed and ladylike Mary typically wears blue.
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* RedOniBlueOni: Wild Laura is spunky and adventurous Laura typically wears red, while composed and ladylike Mary typically wears blue.is quiet and well-mannered.
26th Aug '15 2:52:02 PM phoenix
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* InnocentInaccurate: A young Laura goes through this twice with the same issue: in ''Little House in the Big Woods'', her cousin Charley ends up [[GoshHornet badly stung by bees]] because [[CryingWolf he keeps screaming when nothing is wrong to make his father and Laura's stop working and come running, only to get no response when he really does stumble into the bees' nest]]; Pa concludes that "it serves the little liar right," and Laura lies awake that night wondering how Charley can be a liar when he didn't ''say'' anything. The other time is in ''On the Banks of Plum Creek''; Laura honestly doesn't realize she's committing LoopholeAbuse re: the strawstack (see below), and she doesn't know why Pa looks shocked when she repeatedly denies sliding down it.
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* InnocentInaccurate: A young Laura goes through this twice with the same issue: in ''Little House in the Big Woods'', her cousin Charley ends up [[GoshHornet [[BeeAfraid badly stung by bees]] because [[CryingWolf he keeps screaming when nothing is wrong to make his father and Laura's stop working and come running, only to get no response when he really does stumble into the bees' nest]]; Pa concludes that "it serves the little liar right," and Laura lies awake that night wondering how Charley can be a liar when he didn't ''say'' anything. The other time is in ''On the Banks of Plum Creek''; Laura honestly doesn't realize she's committing LoopholeAbuse re: the strawstack (see below), and she doesn't know why Pa looks shocked when she repeatedly denies sliding down it.
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