History Literature / LittleHouseOnThePrairie

19th Apr '16 12:27:10 PM JoieDeCombat
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* CompositeCharacter: Nellie Oleson... thank God. Laura apparently felt it would be in poor taste to name real people if she was portraying them in a negative light, and so three unpleasant girls Laura knew were rolled into one. And yes, one of them moved from Walnut Grove to De Smet. The descendants of the three girls remain distinctly unimpressed with how much Laura made up. Possibly also Mr. Edwards.

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* CompositeCharacter: CompositeCharacter:
**
Nellie Oleson... thank God. Laura apparently felt it would be in poor taste to name real people if she was portraying them in a negative light, and so three unpleasant girls Laura knew were rolled into one. And yes, one of them moved from Walnut Grove to De Smet. The descendants of the three girls remain distinctly unimpressed with how much Laura made up. Possibly also
** Some researchers believe that
Mr. Edwards.Edwards, the "wildcat from Tennessee" who befriends the Ingalls family during their stay near Independence, Kansas in ''Little House on the Prairie,'' may be an amalgamated depiction of several different people who did kind deeds for the family throughout the years.
19th Apr '16 11:52:43 AM erforce
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* WhipItGood: A gang of rough older boys comes to Almanzo's school every winter to beat up the teacher and drive him away... until this year's model, small, soft-spoken Mr. Corse, literally drives them out IndianaJones-style with a borrowed bullwhip.

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* WhipItGood: A gang of rough older boys comes to Almanzo's school every winter to beat up the teacher and drive him away... until this year's model, small, soft-spoken Mr. Corse, literally drives them out IndianaJones-style Franchise/IndianaJones-style with a borrowed bullwhip.
12th Feb '16 5:30:33 PM toongrrl1990
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** Caroline (academic and bookish) and her sister Martha (practical and sophisticated) are a mild case.

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** Caroline (academic (academic, quiet, neat, and bookish) and her sister Martha (practical (practical, boisterous, messy, and sophisticated) are a mild case.


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** Caroline and her sister Martha. One is neat, bookish, quiet, and is concerned with keeping her clothes pretty and not worn out looking; the other is boisterous, outdoorsy, and impulsive. That said, Martha pines after her future husband and settles as a housewife while Caroline goes to school and teaches before settling down with Charles Ingalls.
25th Dec '15 3:41:31 PM RibbonQuest
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* BookWorm: Caroline, Martha, Mary, Rose and Laura herself.

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* BookWorm: Caroline, Martha, Mary, Rose Rose, and Laura herself.
27th Nov '15 5:14:16 PM Shoebox
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There is some contention about how much of the books are purely Laura Ingalls Wilder: the stories are hers, to be sure, but her daughter was a popular author and was instrumental both in encouraging her mother to publish her story. While Laura already had a background writing columns for local newspapers, some suggest Rose--who was an accomplished ghostwriter--wrote the books herself, while others suggest she merely offered advice and put Laura in touch with her publishing connections; the truth is likely somewhere between the two extremes. A study of the relevant correspondence between the two suggests that Rose's main concern was with the technical details of grammar and style, while her mother focussed on character and plot.

While ''The First Four Years'', which was written without Rose's help, is similar in content but noticeably different in style to the rest of the series, this may have more to do with the fact that (in keeping with the steadily increasing reading level of the series as a whole) it was apparently originally intended for a much more adult audience.

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There is some contention about how much of the books are purely Laura Ingalls Wilder: the stories are hers, to be sure, but her daughter was a popular author and was instrumental both in encouraging her mother to publish her story. While Laura already had a background writing columns for local newspapers, some suggest Rose--who was an accomplished ghostwriter--wrote the books herself, while others suggest she merely offered advice and put Laura in touch with her publishing connections; the truth is likely somewhere between the two extremes. A study of the relevant correspondence between the two suggests that Rose's main concern was with the technical details of grammar and style, while her mother focussed on character and plot. \n\n While ''The First Four Years'', which was written without Rose's help, is similar in content but noticeably different in style to the rest of the series, this may have more to do with the fact that (in keeping with the steadily increasing reading level of the series as a whole) it was apparently originally intended for as a much more adult audience.
take on the same material.
27th Nov '15 5:11:31 PM Shoebox
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There is some contention about how much of the books are purely Laura Ingalls Wilder: the stories are hers, to be sure, but her daughter was a popular author and was instrumental in encouraging her mother to publish her story. While Laura already had a background writing columns for local newspapers, some suggest Rose, who was an accomplished ghostwriter, wrote the books herself, while others suggest she merely offered advice and put Laura in touch with her publishing connections; the truth is likely somewhere between the two extremes. Note that ''The First Four Years'', which was written without Rose's help, is similar in content but noticeably different in style to the rest of the series.

to:

There is some contention about how much of the books are purely Laura Ingalls Wilder: the stories are hers, to be sure, but her daughter was a popular author and was instrumental both in encouraging her mother to publish her story. While Laura already had a background writing columns for local newspapers, some suggest Rose, who Rose--who was an accomplished ghostwriter, wrote ghostwriter--wrote the books herself, while others suggest she merely offered advice and put Laura in touch with her publishing connections; the truth is likely somewhere between the two extremes. Note A study of the relevant correspondence between the two suggests that Rose's main concern was with the technical details of grammar and style, while her mother focussed on character and plot.

While
''The First Four Years'', which was written without Rose's help, is similar in content but noticeably different in style to the rest of the series.
series, this may have more to do with the fact that (in keeping with the steadily increasing reading level of the series as a whole) it was apparently originally intended for a much more adult audience.
26th Nov '15 5:59:36 PM smittykins
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** "There's no great loss without some small gain."
26th Nov '15 1:57:52 PM shamblingdead2
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26th Nov '15 1:56:32 PM shamblingdead2
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Creator/{{Disney}} adapted ''Little House in the Big Woods'' and ''Little House on the Prairie'' into a six-part miniseries in 2005. Carrie was AdaptedOut of the story.
11th Oct '15 10:55:55 AM McJeff
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* BrotherChuck: Unlike Royal and Eliza Jane, Alice neither appears again nor is mentioned after ''Farmer Boy.''


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* ChuckCunninghamSyndrome: Unlike Royal and Eliza Jane, Alice neither appears again nor is mentioned after ''Farmer Boy.'' Sadly, Alice's disappearance is probably because she died in Florida at the age of 39.
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