History Literature / Eisenhorn

24th Jan '18 1:00:28 PM Calandir
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There are also two short stories available, both of which can be found in the [[{{Doorstopper}} doorstopping]] [[{{Anthology}} omnibus]] edition. A spin-off trilogy, ''Literature/{{Ravenor}}'', has been published and Dan Abnett has begun a third "Bequin trilogy", described by him as "Literature/RavenorVsEisenhorn".

In the mean time, Eisenhorn is set to appear in a set of Audio Dramas, collectively called Talon and Thorn.

to:

There are also two several short stories available, both two of which can be found in the [[{{Doorstopper}} doorstopping]] [[{{Anthology}} omnibus]] edition. A spin-off trilogy, ''Literature/{{Ravenor}}'', has been published and Dan Abnett has begun a third "Bequin trilogy", described by him as "Literature/RavenorVsEisenhorn".

In the mean time,
"Literature/RavenorVsEisenhorn". A 4th Eisenhorn novel, titled The Magos is set to appear be released in 2018.

Eisenhorn also appeared
in a the set of Audio Dramas, collectively called Talon and Thorn.
23rd Jan '18 1:15:51 PM Calandir
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* ContinuityDrift: At one point Eisenhorn mentions the "Primarch" of the White Consuls, by which he clearly means the "Chapter Master", but the distinction was less well established in canon back when ''Malleus'' was written, or possibly Eisenhorn just didn't know better in character.

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* ContinuityDrift: At one point Eisenhorn mentions the "Primarch" of the White Consuls, by which he clearly means the "Chapter Master", but the distinction was less well established in canon back when ''Malleus'' was written, or possibly Eisenhorn just didn't know better in character.character (subsequent editions and audios just reference the White Consuls, in context).
27th Oct '17 12:38:59 AM DarkSoldier
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* GodzillaThreshold: Eisenhorn summons Cherubael, breaking its bindings to do so, when faced with [[spoiler:Fayde Thuring at the controls of a Chaos Titan]] and he has ''nothing'' that can even scratch the thing's paint. He then has to bind Cherubael into the nearest convenient body with impromptu binding sigils to save his own neck.



* ItIsDehumanizing: Eisenhorn refers to Cherubael as an "it" while others identify him as a male. As daemons are made from the psychic manifestations of sapient beings, they can develop a dominate gender identity. However, being buddy buddy with demons is a good way to let your guard down and have your soul consumed so the trope is justified. When Eisenhorn starts referring to to Cherubael as a "he" in the ''Ravenor'' series, the titular character starts to get a little leery. Eisenhorn claims that Cherubael and he came to an understanding leaving it ambiguous to whether or not Eisenhorn has fallen or not.

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* ItIsDehumanizing: Eisenhorn refers to Cherubael as an "it" while others identify him as a male. As daemons are made from the psychic manifestations of sapient beings, they can develop a dominate dominant gender identity. However, being buddy buddy with demons is a good way to let your guard down and have your soul consumed consumed, so the trope is justified. When Eisenhorn starts referring to to Cherubael as a "he" in the ''Ravenor'' series, the titular character starts to get a little leery. Eisenhorn claims that Cherubael and he came to an understanding understanding, leaving it ambiguous to whether or not Eisenhorn has fallen or not.



** And ''Christ,'' does the witchhunter in Malleus fall under here. His ''first appearance'' is him [[spoiler: trying to execute Eisenhorn for heresy (though saving his life in the process) on absurdly stupid charges.]] Eisenhorn shortly thereafter recounts a mission where twenty-odd newly discovered psykers, all under 14 years old, were abducted by raiders before the Black Ships could pick them up. Seeing that psykers are ''extremely'' rare, and even rarer to find at such young ages, Eisenhorn launches a mission to rescue them...while the witchhunter decides that kidnapping classifies them all as witches that are in dire need of execution.
*** Not only are psykers very uncommon but the reason that the Imperium sends Black Ships to collect them in the first place is because they're literally necessary for space ships and the Emperor to continue functioning. They're distinctly worth rescuing for all sorts of warm and cold hearted reasons.
** Considering how dangerous a psyker can be, executing a psyker rather than potentially bringing a trojan TykeBomb into a secure location may be the smarter move. And while said witchhunter was (arguably) mistaken at the time, it is hard to deny that Eisenhorn became exactly what he feared by the end of the series.

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** And ''Christ,'' does the witchhunter in Malleus fall under here. His ''first appearance'' is him [[spoiler: trying to execute Eisenhorn for heresy (though saving his life in the process) on absurdly stupid charges.]] Eisenhorn shortly thereafter recounts a mission where twenty-odd newly discovered psykers, all under 14 years old, were abducted by raiders before the Black Ships could pick them up. Seeing that psykers are ''extremely'' rare, and even rarer to find at such young ages, Eisenhorn launches a mission to rescue them...them while the witchhunter decides that kidnapping classifies them all as witches that are in dire need of execution.
*** Not only are psykers very uncommon but the reason that the Imperium sends Black Ships to collect them in the first place is because they're literally necessary for space ships and the Emperor Imperium to continue functioning. They're distinctly worth rescuing for all sorts of warm and cold hearted reasons.
** Considering how dangerous a psyker can be, executing a psyker rather than potentially bringing a trojan Trojan TykeBomb into a secure location may be the smarter move. And while said witchhunter was (arguably) mistaken at the time, it is hard to deny that Eisenhorn became exactly what he feared by the end of the series.
4th Sep '17 8:41:12 PM Peteman
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* WouldNotShootAGoodGuy Brutally averted in ''Malleus'' where Eisenhorn is forced to kill Arbites and Inquisitors who believe him to be a heretic.

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* WouldNotShootAGoodGuy Brutally averted Averted in ''Malleus'' where Eisenhorn is forced to kill Arbites and Inquisitors who believe him to be a heretic.
8th Mar '17 9:08:29 AM Calandir
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Added DiffLines:

* HiddenVillain : Although she isn't mentioned until the Ravenor series, Lilean Chase of the Cognitae is almost an overarching one for the entire series. Eisenhorn spends a great deal of time trying to track her down, unsuccessfully.
29th Oct '16 7:25:11 AM dlchen145
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* {{Badass}}: Several. Harlon Nayl, both Betancores, Eisenhorn himself has moments (to the point where a ''SpaceMarine'' is scared of him), Cherubael, Commodus Voke, Brother Guilar [[TookALevelInBadass takes a level]], and Librarian Bryntoth (implied).
** For non-40k familiar tropers, a "Librarian" in 40k is a genetically engineered super-soldier with the power to tap into a primal chaotic force in battle. "Librarian" is their day job.
12th Oct '16 3:59:39 AM Morgenthaler
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* {{Spinoff}}: Interrogator Ravenor, a supporting character in the ''Eisenhorn'' books who was pretty much developed from a [[ChekhovsGunman namedrop]] in the ''GauntsGhosts'' series, later became the protagonist of his own novel series. ''Eisenhorn'' itself is a spinoff of the ''TabletopGame/{{Inquisitor}}'' GaidenGame to ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'', and the first novel was released concurrently with the game itself.

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* {{Spinoff}}: Interrogator Ravenor, a supporting character in the ''Eisenhorn'' books who was pretty much developed from a [[ChekhovsGunman namedrop]] in the ''GauntsGhosts'' ''Literature/GauntsGhosts'' series, later became the protagonist of his own novel series. ''Eisenhorn'' itself is a spinoff of the ''TabletopGame/{{Inquisitor}}'' GaidenGame to ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'', and the first novel was released concurrently with the game itself.
11th Oct '16 4:28:17 AM Morgenthaler
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* ContinuityNod: Inquisitors Heldane and Literature/{{Ravenor}} both appear in Abnett's earlier ''GauntsGhosts'' novels. Titan Princeps Hekate (from the Graphic Novel series ''Titan'') is also mentioned in ''Malleus'', albeit as an old man near retirement, which was a pleasant surprise for fans, as his own series by that point seemed to have ended in a HeroicSacrifice.

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* ContinuityNod: Inquisitors Heldane and Literature/{{Ravenor}} both appear in Abnett's earlier ''GauntsGhosts'' ''Literature/GauntsGhosts'' novels. Titan Princeps Hekate (from the Graphic Novel series ''Titan'') is also mentioned in ''Malleus'', albeit as an old man near retirement, which was a pleasant surprise for fans, as his own series by that point seemed to have ended in a HeroicSacrifice.
8th Aug '16 9:18:18 AM SomeNewGuy
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Added DiffLines:

A video game adaptation of ''Xenos'', developed by Pixel Hero Games, was released on August 8, 2016.
29th May '16 8:22:19 AM davetheorist666
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The first book, ''Xenos'', starts with Gregor Eisenhorn and his crew pursuing a heretic in a seemingly routine task when they uncover a mysterious artifact bearing the preserved mind of the heretic Pontius Glaw. In the subsequent investigation, Eisenhorn and crew find themselves embroiled in a heretic group's plan to contact aliens for a demonic text.

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The first book, ''Xenos'', starts with Gregor Eisenhorn and his crew pursuing a heretic in a seemingly routine task when they uncover a mysterious artifact bearing the preserved mind of the heretic Pontius Glaw. In the subsequent investigation, Eisenhorn and crew find themselves embroiled in a heretic group's plan to contact aliens for a demonic daemonic text.
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