History Literature / DeathOnTheNile

12th Jun '17 3:58:34 AM fgenzo159
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* AdaptationalWimp: Downplayed with Poirot, in that [[spoiler:he does not deliberately allow Jackie to kill herself, but instead she simply steals the original gun and performs the double suicide right in front of him, to his shock. His response: "Quelle tragedie".]]

to:

* AdaptationalWimp: Downplayed with Poirot, in that [[spoiler:he does not deliberately allow Jackie to kill herself, but instead she simply steals the original gun and performs the double suicide right in front of him, to his shock. His response: "Quelle tragedie".tragédie".]]
5th May '17 6:11:33 PM benda
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* PsychoExGirlfriend: ''Jacqueline''. [[spoiler: But not so much [[NewOldFlame ex]].]]

to:

* PsychoExGirlfriend: ''Jacqueline''. [[spoiler: But not so much [[NewOldFlame ex]].ex]], and the "psycho" part is staged.]]
29th Mar '17 9:50:35 AM erforce
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Literature/HerculePoirot is on holiday in Egypt, on a Nile River cruise. Among the other passengers is Linnet Ridgeway, a rich, beautiful heiress, honeymooning with her husband Simon Doyle. Doyle was engaged to Linnetís best friend, Jacqueline de Bellefort, before he met Linnet, and broke it off. Heartbroken and wanting revenge on her former friend for stealing her fiancé, Jacqueline started following them everywhere they go. When Linnet gets killed, Jacqueline is the obvious suspect. But is that really the case?

Christie adapted the story as a stage play titled ''Murder on the Nile'' in 1944. The story was later adapted as a 1978 film boasting an AllStarCast that included Peter Ustinov (the first of six times Ustinov played Poirot in film or television), Creator/MaggieSmith, Creator/BetteDavis, Creator/MiaFarrow, Creator/DavidNiven, and Creator/AngelaLansbury. It was directed by John Guillermin. The story was also adapted for BBC Radio 4 in 1997, with John Moffatt playing Poirot. In 2004 it was adapted for the ninth season of the television series ''Series/{{Poirot}}''; tropes for the adaptation are listed on the series page.

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to:

Literature/HerculePoirot is on holiday in Egypt, on a Nile River cruise. Among the other passengers is Linnet Ridgeway, a rich, beautiful heiress, honeymooning with her husband Simon Doyle. Doyle was engaged to Linnetís best friend, Jacqueline de Bellefort, before he met Linnet, and broke it off. Heartbroken and wanting revenge on her former friend for stealing her fiancé, Jacqueline started following them everywhere they go. When Linnet gets killed, Jacqueline is the obvious suspect. But is that really the case?

Christie adapted the story as a stage play titled ''Murder on the Nile'' in 1944. The story was later adapted as a 1978 film boasting an AllStarCast that included Peter Ustinov (the first of six times Ustinov played Poirot in film or television), Creator/MaggieSmith, Creator/BetteDavis, Creator/MiaFarrow, Creator/DavidNiven, and Creator/AngelaLansbury. It was directed by John Guillermin. The story was also adapted for BBC Radio 4 in 1997, with John Moffatt playing Poirot. In 2004 it was adapted for the ninth season of the television series ''Series/{{Poirot}}''; tropes for the adaptation are listed on the series page.

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page.



* AccidentalTruth: With nothing more than her obsession with "bloodlust and the sex instinct" to justify her, Salome Otterbourne drunkenly suggests to Poirot the name of [[spoiler:first Jackie and then Simon]] as the killer. She's right. [[spoiler:Both times.]]

to:


* AccidentalTruth: With nothing more than her obsession with "bloodlust and the sex instinct" to justify her, Salome Otterbourne drunkenly suggests to Poirot the name of [[spoiler:first Jackie and then Simon]] as the killer. She's right. [[spoiler:Both times.]] ]]



* AssholeVictim: Linnet isn't one of the worst Christie examples, but stealing her best friend's fiancé makes her easy to dislike.

to:

* AssholeVictim: Linnet isn't one of the worst Christie examples, but stealing her best friend's fiancé makes her easy to dislike.



* TheSummation

to:

* %%* TheSummation



* WeUsedToBeFriends: [[spoiler: Until you try to steal your best friend's fiancé. Linnet, you bitch.]]

to:

* WeUsedToBeFriends: [[spoiler: Until you try to steal your best friend's fiancé. Linnet, you bitch.]]



!! In addition, the various adaptations, excluding the ITV adaptation which is covered by the [[Series/{{Poirot}} series page]], contain examples of:
* AdaptationDistillation: The stage play and the 1978 film version simplified the plot and removed several superfluous characters.
* AdaptationalBadass: In the 1978 film, Simon [[spoiler:puts up far stronger resistance and a more convincing denial than in the book; Poirot and Race have to resort to a bluff in order to cause him (and Jackie) to confess. Some of his lines during this passage are drawn from Christie's stage play, as is the bluff of the moulage test. In the original book, all it takes to break Simon down is the shock of Poirot hitting him with all that he knows.]]
* AdaptationalHeroism: Mr. Ferguson comes across more sympathetically in the 1978 film, in which he replaces Tim Allerton as Rosalie's love interest, becoming engaged to her in the final scene.
** Simon Doyle comes out looking [[DownplayedTrope slightly better]] in the 1978 film version, but only in small details that do not change the plot in any way. For example, [[spoiler:he is initially reluctant to go through with the killing of Louise, preferring to pay her (before Jackie convinces him otherwise), and in the final summation his backstory is given slightly more sympathy than in the book.]]
* AdaptationalNameChange: In the stage play ''Murder on the Nile'', Simon Doyle becomes Simon Mostyn, Jacqueline de Bellefort is Jacqueline de Severac, Linnet is renamed Kay, Cornelia becomes Christina Grant, Mr. Ferguson becomes William Smith, Mrs. van Schyler becomes Helen ffoliot-ffoulkes, and Poirot is replaced by a composite character in Canon Ambrose Pennyfather.
* AdaptationalVillainy: Similarly, downplayed with Jacqueline de Bellefort in the 1978 version. [[spoiler:It is she, not Simon, who advocates for killing Louise instead of paying her, and a large part of her exposition to Poirot at the end is omitted and replaced by a denial act in conjunction with Simon's.]] The latter of these points is drawn from the final scene in Christie's stage play.
* AdaptationalWimp: Downplayed with Poirot in the 1978 film, in that [[spoiler:he does not deliberately allow Jackie to kill herself, but instead she simply steals the original gun and performs the double suicide right in front of him, to his shock. His response: "Quelle tragedie".]]
* AdaptedOut: The 1978 film omits Cornelia Robson, the Allertons, Mr Fanthorp, Joanna Southwood, Lord Windlesham, Signor Richetti, and Linnet's maid Marie. ''Murder on the Nile'' omits all of these except Cornelia Robson (renamed Christina Grant), as well as Miss Bowers and Salome and Rosalie Otterbourne (Salome's [[spoiler:death scene, being shot from off-screen, is given instead to Louise.]])
* BittersweetEnding: The stage play goes for this. Poirot's replacement, Canon Pennyfather, attempts to school [[spoiler:Jackie on why she must not take her own life, and instead live on "until the appointed end" and endure the punishment for murder, for the sake of her soul. He hands her back her gun, to allow her to make the choice herself - and after considering, she puts the gun back down and surrenders herself.]]
* CompositeCharacter:
** Rosalie Otterbourne in the 1978 film is a composite of three separate characters from the book: Rosalie, Cornelia Robson, and Tim Allerton. However, Ms Bowers is given Cornelia's backstory regarding her history with the Ridgeways. Louise takes Marie's role, and Jim Ferguson is a composite of Mr. Ferguson, Mr. Fanthorp, and Tim Allerton (in the latter, being Rosalie Ottorbourne's love interest).
** In the stage play ''Murder on the Nile'', Canon Ambrose Pennyfather is a combination of Poirot, Race and Pennington.
* CompressedAdaptation: In the play rendition of ''Death on the Nile'', known as ''Murder on the Nile'', there are significantly fewer characters than in the book counterpart. [[AdaptationNameChange Names of some characters have also been changed]], while others [[AdaptedOut were completely taken out of the cast]]. Poirot is also removed, as he frequently was in Christie's adaptations of Poirot novels, owing to her dissatisfaction with any actor cast to play him in plays or movies during her lifetime.
* DeadpanSnarker: Mrs Van Schyler and Miss Bowers in the 1978 film.
** Colonel Race as well.
* FateDrivesUsTogether: William Smith and Christina Grant in ''Murder on the Nile'' where he continuously courts her and at last asks to marry her. She refuses at first but it is hinted and later revealed that they do get married.
* ItsPersonal: This element is added to Canon Pennyfather's (the Poirot equivalent's) investigation of the murder of Kay (the Linnet equivalent) in ''Murder on the Nile'' as a result of his being her honorary uncle, her deceased father's best friend.
* LargeHam: In the BBC Radio adaptation, Sir Donald Sinden as Colonel Race.
* MaybeEverAfter: ''Murder on the Nile'' ends with this possibility open for William Smith and Christina Grant (the equivalents of Mr. Ferguson and Cornelia Robson); this was not the case in the book.
* MoodWhiplash: Done very effectively in the 1978 adaptation. A rather humorous scene with Mrs. Otterbourne ends abruptly with [[spoiler: her being shot in the head]].
* PrettyInMink: In the 1978 fim, a fur stole is used as part of the murder, [[spoiler:specifically to muffle a second gunshot]].
* SceneryPorn: Oh dear God, yes. Legendary cinematographer Jack Cardiff and Egypt are a match made in heaven in the 1978 film.
* SimpleYetOpulent: Linnet's costly white dress in the 1978 film.
* SparedByTheAdaptation: The stage play ''Murder on the Nile'' omits [[spoiler:the double suicide, ending instead with Canon Pennyfather pursuading Jackie not to shoot herself.]] The trope applies only in a sense, however, in that while [[spoiler:she and Simon are still alive by the end of the play, they will both most certainly be executed for the murders at some point afterwards.]]
* SummationGathering: In the 1978 film, all the suspects were present at this, making for a suspenseful scene in which all the characters are looking at each other nervously. In the book, only Colonel Race, Dr. Bessner, and Cornelia Robson are present for Poirot's summation. Averted in the stage play, in which only [[spoiler:Jackie]] is onstage for Canon Pennyfather's final summation.
* UnreliableVoiceover: In the 1978 film, as Salome Otterbourne is saying "I was talking to one of the crew, who was showing me a most intriguing sight, a buffalo and a cow yoked together tilling the soil", a flashback is shown in which she is in fact secretly buying alcohol from a crew member.

to:

!! In addition, the various adaptations, excluding the ITV !!The BBC radio adaptation which is covered by the [[Series/{{Poirot}} series page]], contain has examples of:
of:

* LargeHam: Sir Donald Sinden as Colonel Race.

!!The 1978 film adaptation has examples of:

* AdaptationDistillation: The stage play and the 1978 film version simplified the plot of the novel and removed several superfluous characters.
* AdaptationalBadass: In the 1978 film, Simon [[spoiler:puts up far stronger resistance and a more convincing denial than in the book; Poirot and Race have to resort to a bluff in order to cause him (and Jackie) to confess. Some of his lines during this passage are drawn from Christie's stage play, as is the bluff of the moulage test. In the original book, all it takes to break Simon down is the shock of Poirot hitting him with all that he knows.]]
* AdaptationalHeroism: AdaptationalHeroism:
**
Mr. Ferguson comes across more sympathetically in the 1978 film, in which he sympathetically, since his character replaces Tim Allerton from the novel as Rosalie's love interest, becoming engaged to her in the final scene.
scene.
** Simon Doyle comes out looking [[DownplayedTrope slightly better]] in the 1978 film version, better]], but only in small details that do not change the plot in any way. For example, [[spoiler:he is initially reluctant to go through with the killing of Louise, preferring to pay her (before Jackie convinces him otherwise), and in the final summation his backstory is given slightly more sympathy than in the book.]]
* AdaptationalNameChange: In the stage play ''Murder on the Nile'', Simon Doyle becomes Simon Mostyn, Jacqueline de Bellefort is Jacqueline de Severac, Linnet is renamed Kay, Cornelia becomes Christina Grant, Mr. Ferguson becomes William Smith, Mrs. van Schyler becomes Helen ffoliot-ffoulkes, and Poirot is replaced by a composite character in Canon Ambrose Pennyfather.
]]
* AdaptationalVillainy: Similarly, downplayed Downplayed with Jacqueline de Bellefort in the 1978 version.Bellefort. [[spoiler:It is she, not Simon, who advocates for killing Louise instead of paying her, and a large part of her exposition to Poirot at the end is omitted and replaced by a denial act in conjunction with Simon's.]] The latter of these points is drawn from the final scene in Christie's stage play.
play.
* AdaptationalWimp: Downplayed with Poirot in the 1978 film, Poirot, in that [[spoiler:he does not deliberately allow Jackie to kill herself, but instead she simply steals the original gun and performs the double suicide right in front of him, to his shock. His response: "Quelle tragedie".]]
]]
* AdaptedOut: The 1978 film omits Cornelia Robson, the Allertons, Mr Fanthorp, Joanna Southwood, Lord Windlesham, Signor Richetti, and Linnet's maid Marie. ''Murder on the Nile'' omits all of these except Cornelia Robson (renamed Christina Grant), as well as Miss Bowers and Salome and Rosalie Otterbourne (Salome's [[spoiler:death scene, being shot from off-screen, is given instead to Louise.]])
]])
* BittersweetEnding: The stage play goes for this. AnimalAssassin: As Poirot's replacement, Canon Pennyfather, attempts to school [[spoiler:Jackie on why she must not take her own life, and instead live on "until investigation progresses, the appointed end" and endure the punishment for murder, for the sake culprit tries to get rid of her soul. He hands her back her gun, to allow her to make the choice herself - and after considering, she puts the gun back down and surrenders herself.]]
him by leaving a cobra inside his cabin.
* CompositeCharacter:
**
CompositeCharacter: Rosalie Otterbourne in the 1978 film is a composite of three separate characters from the book: Rosalie, Cornelia Robson, and Tim Allerton. However, Ms Bowers is given Cornelia's backstory regarding her history with the Ridgeways. Louise takes Marie's role, and Jim Ferguson is a composite of Mr. Ferguson, Mr. Fanthorp, and Tim Allerton (in the latter, being Rosalie Ottorbourne's love interest).interest).
%%* DeadpanSnarker:
%%** Mrs. Van Schuyler and Miss Bowers.
%%** Colonel Race as well.
* HisNameIs: [[spoiler:Mrs. Otterbourne, being typically drunk]], takes her time telling who was behind [[spoiler:Jacqueline De Bellefort]]'s death, only to be shot while saying "and I saw that it was--".

** * MoodWhiplash: Done very effectively. A rather humorous scene with Mrs. Otterbourne ends abruptly with [[spoiler: her being shot in the head]].
* {{Mooning}}: Mrs. Van Schuyler sees some boys do this at the steamer as they run alongside it on the riverside. She isn't very pleased about it.
* PrettyInMink: A fur stole is used as part of the murder, [[spoiler:specifically to muffle a second gunshot]].
* SarcasticClapping: The killer does this after Poirot finishes [[TheSummation his summation]] near the end, believing that Poirot has no evidence to back it up.
* SceneryPorn: Oh dear God, yes. Legendary cinematographer Jack Cardiff and Egypt are a match made in heaven for the film.
* SimpleYetOpulent: Linnet's costly white dress.
* SummationGathering: All the suspects were present at this, making for a suspenseful scene in which all the characters are looking at each other nervously.
In the book, only Colonel Race, Dr. Bessner, and Cornelia Robson are present for Poirot's summation. Averted in the stage play ''Murder play, in which only [[spoiler:Jackie]] is onstage for Canon Pennyfather's final summation.
* SwordCane: Colonel Race saves Poirot from the Cobra left inside his cabin by bursting in with his sword from within his cane, and kills the snake with it.
* UnreliableVoiceover: As Salome Otterbourne is saying "I was talking to one of the crew, who was showing me a most intriguing sight, a buffalo and a cow yoked together tilling the soil", a flashback is shown in which she is in fact secretly buying alcohol from a crew member.

!!''Murder
on the Nile'', Nile'' has examples of:

* AdaptationDistillation: The play simplified the plot of the novel and removed several superfluous characters.
* AdaptationalNameChange: Simon Doyle becomes Simon Mostyn, Jacqueline de Bellefort is Jacqueline de Severac, Linnet is renamed Kay, Cornelia becomes Christina Grant, Mr. Ferguson becomes William Smith, Mrs. van Schyler becomes Helen ffoliot-ffoulkes, and Poirot is replaced by a composite character in Canon Ambrose Pennyfather.
* BittersweetEnding: Poirot's replacement, Canon Pennyfather, attempts to school [[spoiler:Jackie on why she must not take her own life, and instead live on "until the appointed end" and endure the punishment for murder, for the sake of her soul. He hands her back her gun, to allow her to make the choice herself - and after considering, she puts the gun back down and surrenders herself.]]
* CompositeCharacter:
Canon Ambrose Pennyfather is a combination of Poirot, Race and Pennington.
Pennington.
* CompressedAdaptation: In the play rendition of ''Death on the Nile'', known as ''Murder on the Nile'', there There are significantly fewer characters than in the book counterpart. [[AdaptationNameChange Names of some characters have also been changed]], while others [[AdaptedOut were completely taken out of the cast]]. Poirot is also removed, as he frequently was in Christie's adaptations of Poirot novels, owing to her dissatisfaction with any actor cast to play him in plays or movies during her lifetime.
* DeadpanSnarker: Mrs Van Schyler and Miss Bowers in the 1978 film.
** Colonel Race as well.
* FateDrivesUsTogether: Brought up between William Smith and Christina Grant in ''Murder on the Nile'' where he Grant. He continuously courts her and at last asks to marry her. She refuses at first but it is hinted and later revealed that they do get married.
* ItsPersonal: This element is added to Canon Pennyfather's (the Poirot equivalent's) investigation of the murder of Kay (the Linnet equivalent) in ''Murder on the Nile'' as a result of his being her honorary uncle, her deceased father's best friend.
* LargeHam: In the BBC Radio adaptation, Sir Donald Sinden as Colonel Race.
friend.
* MaybeEverAfter: ''Murder on the Nile'' The play ends with this possibility open for William Smith and Christina Grant (the equivalents of Mr. Ferguson and Cornelia Robson); this was not the case in the book.
* MoodWhiplash: Done very effectively in the 1978 adaptation. A rather humorous scene with Mrs. Otterbourne ends abruptly with [[spoiler: her being shot in the head]].
* PrettyInMink: In the 1978 fim, a fur stole is used as part of the murder, [[spoiler:specifically to muffle a second gunshot]].
* SceneryPorn: Oh dear God, yes. Legendary cinematographer Jack Cardiff and Egypt are a match made in heaven in the 1978 film.
* SimpleYetOpulent: Linnet's costly white dress in the 1978 film.
book.
* SparedByTheAdaptation: The stage play ''Murder on the Nile'' omits [[spoiler:the double suicide, ending instead with Canon Pennyfather pursuading Jackie not to shoot herself.]] The trope applies only in a sense, however, in that while [[spoiler:she and Simon are still alive by the end of the play, they will both most certainly be executed for the murders at some point afterwards.]]
* SummationGathering: In the 1978 film, all the suspects were present at this, making for a suspenseful scene in which all the characters are looking at each other nervously. In the book, only Colonel Race, Dr. Bessner, and Cornelia Robson are present for Poirot's summation. Averted in the stage play, in which only [[spoiler:Jackie]] is onstage for Canon Pennyfather's final summation.
* UnreliableVoiceover: In the 1978 film, as Salome Otterbourne is saying "I was talking to one of the crew, who was showing me a most intriguing sight, a buffalo and a cow yoked together tilling the soil", a flashback is shown in which she is in fact secretly buying alcohol from a crew member.
]]
28th Mar '17 8:11:04 PM PaulA
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Added DiffLines:

* CompressedAdaptation: In the play rendition of ''Death on the Nile'', known as ''Murder on the Nile'', there are significantly fewer characters than in the book counterpart. [[AdaptationNameChange Names of some characters have also been changed]], while others [[AdaptedOut were completely taken out of the cast]]. Poirot is also removed, as he frequently was in Christie's adaptations of Poirot novels, owing to her dissatisfaction with any actor cast to play him in plays or movies during her lifetime.


Added DiffLines:

* FateDrivesUsTogether: William Smith and Christina Grant in ''Murder on the Nile'' where he continuously courts her and at last asks to marry her. She refuses at first but it is hinted and later revealed that they do get married.
27th Mar '17 4:43:12 PM NightShade96
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* DrivenToSuicide / LeaveBehindAPistol: [[spoiler:In the novel, there's a ''second'' pistol which Jacqueline uses to kill Simon and herself rather than face execution for murder. Poirot says he knew of the second gun and allowed them the choice for the "honorable" way out.]]

to:

* DrivenToSuicide / LeaveBehindAPistol: DrivenToSuicide: [[spoiler:In the novel, there's a ''second'' pistol which Jacqueline uses to kill Simon and herself rather than face execution for murder. Poirot says he knew of the second gun and [[LeaveBehindAPistol allowed them the choice choice]] for the "honorable" way out.]]



* EeriePaleSkinnedBrunette: Jacqueline de Bellefort

to:

* EeriePaleSkinnedBrunette: Jacqueline de BellefortBellefort.



* InnocentBlueEyes: [[spoiler: The murderer aka]] Simon Doyle has bright blue eyes.

to:

* InnocentBlueEyes: [[spoiler: The murderer aka]] Simon Doyle has bright blue eyes.eyes, [[spoiler: but is definitely not innocent.]]



* MurderSuicide: [[spoiler:Jacqueline shoots Simon and then herself.]]

to:

* MurderSuicide: [[spoiler:Jacqueline shoots Simon and then herself.herself at the end.]]



* OneTractMind: Mr. Ferguson, who regards any activity not tending towards the Communist utopia as fiddling {{while Rome burns}}.

to:

* OneTractMind: OneTractMind:
**
Mr. Ferguson, who regards any activity not tending towards the Communist utopia as fiddling {{while Rome burns}}.



* RichBitch: Miss Van Schuyler and Joanna Southwood.
** Linnet herself is a bit of a deconstruction. She has been rich all her life and can tend to be a bit callous because of it, the most obvious example being her behavior towards Simon and Jackie. But she is also portrayed as a [[SpoiledSweet generally kind and generous person]] who is uncomfortable with Joanna Southwood's behavior, and is implied to feel guilty over how she treated her former best friend. Poirot, though not approving her actions, pities her even before the murder.
* RichSuitorPoorSuitor: Linnet and Jacqueline.

to:

* RichBitch: RichBitch:
**
Miss Van Schuyler and Joanna Southwood.
** Linnet herself is a bit of a deconstruction. She has been rich all her life and can tend to be a bit callous because of it, the most obvious example being her behavior towards Simon and Jackie. But Jackie, but she is also portrayed as a [[SpoiledSweet generally kind and generous person]] who is uncomfortable with Joanna Southwood's behavior, and is implied to feel guilty over how she treated her former best friend. Poirot, though not approving of her actions, pities her even before the murder.
* RichSuitorPoorSuitor: RichSuitorPoorSuitor:
**
Linnet and Jacqueline.



* WomanScorned: Jacqueline [[spoiler: or at least that's what she wanted everyone to believe]].
* {{Yandere}}: Jacqueline. [[spoiler: SubvertedTrope as we find out it was it was all a cover to hide her complicity with Simon. In fact, she was even ready to set her love free to marry ''her best friend''.]]

to:

* WomanScorned: Jacqueline [[spoiler: or (or at least that's what she wanted everyone to believe]].
believe)]].
* {{Yandere}}: Jacqueline. [[spoiler: This is a SubvertedTrope as we find out it was it was all a cover to hide her complicity with Simon. In fact, she was even ready to set her love free to marry ''her best friend''.]]
10th Mar '17 5:34:56 PM JakesBrain
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* OldMoney: Miss Van Schuyler and Cornelia Robson, although only Miss Van Schuyler exhibits the stereotypical snobbishness of the upper crust. [[spoiler:Poirot ''blows Miss Van Schuyler's mind'' by revealing to her that Mr. Ferguson, for whom she has developed a distinct dislike, is actually a BlueBlood who won't use his title or rely on his family's money because he's a communist.]]



* RichBitch: Miss Van Schuyler and Joanna Southwood

to:

* RichBitch: Miss Van Schuyler and Joanna SouthwoodSouthwood.
10th Mar '17 5:26:49 PM JakesBrain
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Added DiffLines:

** Mrs. Otterbourne. As a "transgressive" author (transgressive for the Thirties, anyway), she turns out to be sexually obsessed; all her theories regarding Linnet's murder paint the perpetrator as driven by sexual jealousy. [[spoiler:Her instinct leads her, ironically, to point the finger at both Jackie and Simon, but for totally wrong reasons.]]
7th Mar '17 11:29:03 AM JakesBrain
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Added DiffLines:

* ArtisticLicenseGeography: During questioning, Cornelia Robson gives her address as the name of her family home, followed by the name of the town. You can get away with this in British small towns where everyone, including the postman, knows exactly which house is which (or at least you could have in Christie's day) -- but Cornelia is ''American'', and would properly have felt this to be inadequate without the actual street address.
22nd Jan '17 4:04:30 AM yisfidri
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* BittersweetEnding: The stage play goes for this. Poirot's replacement, Canon Pennyfather, attempts to school [[spoiler:Jackie on why she must not take her own life, and instead live on "until the appointed end" and endure the punishment for murder, for the sake of her soul. He hands her back her gun, to allow her to make the choice herself - and after considering, she puts the gun back down and surrenders herself.]]



* SummationGathering: In the 1978 film, all the suspects were present at this, making for a suspenseful scene in which all the characters are looking at each other nervously. In the book, only Colonel Race, Dr. Bessner, and Cornelia Robson are present for Poirot's summation. Averted in the stage play, in which only Jackie is onstage for Canon Pennyfather's final summation.

to:

* SummationGathering: In the 1978 film, all the suspects were present at this, making for a suspenseful scene in which all the characters are looking at each other nervously. In the book, only Colonel Race, Dr. Bessner, and Cornelia Robson are present for Poirot's summation. Averted in the stage play, in which only Jackie [[spoiler:Jackie]] is onstage for Canon Pennyfather's final summation.
22nd Jan '17 12:52:36 AM yisfidri
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Christie adapted the story as a stage play titled ''Murder on the Nile'' in 1944. The story was later adapted as a 1978 film boasting an AllStarCast that included Peter Ustinov (the first of six times Ustinov played Poirot in film or television), Creator/MaggieSmith, Creator/BetteDavis, Creator/MiaFarrow, Creator/DavidNiven, and Creator/AngelaLansbury. It was directed by John Guillermin. In 2004 it was adapted as an episode of the television series ''Series/{{Poirot}}''. It was also adapted for BBC Radio 4 in 1997, with John Moffatt playing Poirot.

to:

Christie adapted the story as a stage play titled ''Murder on the Nile'' in 1944. The story was later adapted as a 1978 film boasting an AllStarCast that included Peter Ustinov (the first of six times Ustinov played Poirot in film or television), Creator/MaggieSmith, Creator/BetteDavis, Creator/MiaFarrow, Creator/DavidNiven, and Creator/AngelaLansbury. It was directed by John Guillermin. In 2004 it was adapted as an episode of the television series ''Series/{{Poirot}}''. It The story was also adapted for BBC Radio 4 in 1997, with John Moffatt playing Poirot.
Poirot. In 2004 it was adapted for the ninth season of the television series ''Series/{{Poirot}}''; tropes for the adaptation are listed on the series page.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.DeathOnTheNile