History Literature / BooksOfKings

3rd Jan '17 12:25:22 PM GothicProphet
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* OneSceneWonder: Josiah, king of Judah. His destruction of idols and sanctuaries of other gods in Judah is epic, he even destroys altars and statues that previous reformers had left in place, and which had been standing since the time of Solomon. He also recovers the Mosaic law and celebrates the first Passover in centuries. The chapters discussing his reign are like the muster of Patroclus in Literature/TheIliad, where he succeeds so well that he verges on changing fate; but God has already made up his mind. God informs him that he's very impressed with what he accomplished, but Israel will still be destroyed; [[DownerEnding but God will wait until after Josiah is dead for it to happen]].



* RonTheDeathEater: A [[InUniverse canon]] example. Many of the kings in the book were reportedly not nearly as bad in Real Life as they are described, the most egregious cases being King Ahab of Israel and King Manasseh of Juda. Both are described as evil heretics [[ZeroPercentApprovalRating hated by every single one of their subjects]]. The fact alone that Ahab could rule for 22 years and Manasseh for 55 years indicates that they must've had at least some support among the population. In fact, both of them are indicated by several non-biblical sources to have been very successful rulers whose only "fault" was not to piss off their much stronger neighbors who could effortlessly overrun them. Though this would mean tolerating the worship of other gods and routinely melting gold from the temple in Jerusalem to be able to pay tribute, it at least saved their land from complete obliteration. The priesthood in Jerusalem naturally would condemn them for not daring to start a hopeless war against the hegemonial empires that surrounded them on all sides, because [[SuicidalOverconfidence with God's help one was invincible, no matter how improbable the odds were]]. They eventually learned the hard way [[CurbStompBattle what]] [[MadeASlave happens]] when you insist on getting belligerent with a neighboring superpower. Though some of the descriptions of said kings could be justified by way of the Old Testament not being a historical, but a theological piece of work, some of the things written are just simply out of malice (such as [[CriticalResearchFailure attributing the construction of the Arc of Samaria to King Solomon instead of Ahab, who built it]]).
28th Dec '16 12:35:25 PM LordGro
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* HeroOfAnotherStory: King Ahab, who was the commander of the Levantine alliance against Assyria in the battle of Karkar 853 BC. The battle is not mentioned in the Bible, but Assyrian sources describe it, and also say "Ahab himself was worth of [[BloodKnight 5,000 chariots single-handed]]".
28th Dec '16 12:34:23 PM LordGro
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%%
%% Zero Context Examples have been commented out. Please provide context before uncommenting.
%%



* TheAlcoholic: King Elah of Israel.

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* %%* TheAlcoholic: King Elah of Israel.



* BloodKnight: King Ahab of Israel.
* CainAndAbel / RedOniBlueOni: Israel and Judah.

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* %%* BloodKnight: King Ahab of Israel.
* %%* CainAndAbel / RedOniBlueOni: Israel and Judah.



* DeathByFallingOver: King Ahaziah of Israel.

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* %%* DeathByFallingOver: King Ahaziah of Israel.



* {{Egopolis}}: Israel during the reign of Omri.

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* %%* {{Egopolis}}: Israel during the reign of Omri.



* FaceHeelTurn[=/=]FaithHeelTurn: King Joash of Judah after Jehoiada the priest died.

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* %%* FaceHeelTurn[=/=]FaithHeelTurn: King Joash of Judah after Jehoiada the priest died.



* GodSaveUsFromTheQueen: Jezebel and Athaliah.

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* %%* GodSaveUsFromTheQueen: Jezebel and Athaliah.



* HeelFaceTurn: Manasseh.

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* %%* HeelFaceTurn: Manasseh.



* IntimateHealing: Done twice by the prophets Elijah and Elisha.
* {{Jerkass}}: Rehoboam, Solomon's son.
* KlingonPromotion: Common in the northern kingdom of Israel as far as royal successions go.

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* %%* IntimateHealing: Done twice by the prophets Elijah and Elisha.
* %%* {{Jerkass}}: Rehoboam, Solomon's son.
* %%* KlingonPromotion: Common in the northern kingdom of Israel as far as royal successions go.



* PetTheDog: Chronicles does this for the bad kings of Judah and even the Northern Israelites in the few times they are mentioned.

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* %%* PetTheDog: Chronicles does this for the bad kings of Judah and even the Northern Israelites in the few times they are mentioned.



* PuppetKing: Israel & Judah had their share.
* ThePurge: Oh, so much.
* TheReasonYouSuckSpeech: King Abijah of Judah gave one about Jeroboam in Chronicles.

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* %%* PuppetKing: Israel & Judah had their share.
* %%* ThePurge: Oh, so much.
* %%* TheReasonYouSuckSpeech: King Abijah of Judah gave one about Jeroboam in Chronicles.



* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism: The Kings books lean towards cynicism, while the Chronicles are more idealistic.

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* %%* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism: The Kings books lean towards cynicism, while the Chronicles are more idealistic.



* TheStarscream: Majority of Northern Israel's kings.

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* %%* TheStarscream: Majority of Northern Israel's kings.



* ViceCity: North Israel. Especially pronounced in Amos.

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* %%* ViceCity: North Israel. Especially pronounced in Amos.
1st Dec '16 7:25:23 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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In Christian Bibles it is followed by 1 & 2 Chronicles, a LighterAndSofter rehashing of Kings focusing exclusively on the southern Kingdom of Judah to inspire the Jews exiled to Babylon. Most of the Prophets preached during this period so they will be discussed here also. In the Jewish Tanakh it is followed by the Book of Isaiah (Chronicles is relegated to the ''Ketuvim''[[note]]Recall that "Tanakh" is an acronym for'' '''T'''orah'' ([[CaptainObvious the Torah]]),'' '''N'''eviim'' (the Prophets), and'' '''K'''etuvim'' ("writings"). Kings is considered a prophetic book as several prophets figure prominently.[[/note]]).

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In Christian Bibles it is followed by 1 & 2 Chronicles, a LighterAndSofter rehashing of Kings focusing exclusively on the southern Kingdom of Judah to inspire the Jews exiled to Babylon. Most of the Prophets preached during this period so they will be discussed here also. In the Jewish Tanakh it is followed by the Book of Isaiah Isaiah. (Chronicles is relegated to the ''Ketuvim''[[note]]Recall that "Tanakh" is an acronym for'' '''T'''orah'' ([[CaptainObvious the Torah]]),'' '''N'''eviim'' (the Prophets), and'' '''K'''etuvim'' ("writings"). Kings is considered a prophetic book as several prophets figure prominently.[[/note]]).



** In the book of Ezekiel, Israel and Judah are compared to young girls who prostituted themselves in Egypt and were graciously taken as wives by {{God}} (despite their history...or maybe because of it), and given everything they could possibly want and more...only to lust after Assyrian soldiers (that is, desire political alliances with neighboring superpowers instead of relying on {{God}} to protect and provide for them) and go back to their old whoring ways. Both end up being killed "and their names became bywords among women."

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** In the book of Ezekiel, Israel and Judah are compared to young girls who prostituted themselves in Egypt and were graciously taken as wives by {{God}} (despite their history... or maybe because of it), and given everything they could possibly want and more...more... only to lust after Assyrian soldiers (that is, desire political alliances with neighboring superpowers instead of relying on {{God}} to protect and provide for them) and go back to their old whoring ways. Both end up being killed "and their names became bywords among women."
29th Nov '16 1:39:27 AM Mhazard
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* BackFromTheDead: In 1 Kings 17:8-24, After Elijah was directed to a house in Zarephath and he supplied foods to a widow and her son, the boy felt ill and became breathless. Elijah prays to God for [[RuleOfThree threes times]] in a hope that God would let the boy's life return to life. God heard Elijah's cry and returned the boy's life to him, resurrecting the child.

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* BackFromTheDead: BackFromTheDead:
**
In 1 Kings 17:8-24, After Elijah was directed to a house in Zarephath and he supplied foods to a widow and her son, the boy felt ill and became breathless. Elijah prays to God for [[RuleOfThree threes times]] in a hope that God would let the boy's life return to life. God heard Elijah's cry and returned the boy's life to him, resurrecting the child.child.
** Elisha did two, in 2 Kings 4:32-37, he prayed to God to resurrect the son of a Shunammite woman while staying with the child, and the other one is done posthumously in 2 Kings 13:21, by having a corpse landed onto the bones of Elisha.
29th Nov '16 1:20:18 AM Mhazard
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Added DiffLines:

* BackFromTheDead: In 1 Kings 17:8-24, After Elijah was directed to a house in Zarephath and he supplied foods to a widow and her son, the boy felt ill and became breathless. Elijah prays to God for [[RuleOfThree threes times]] in a hope that God would let the boy's life return to life. God heard Elijah's cry and returned the boy's life to him, resurrecting the child.
25th Nov '16 5:57:56 AM morane
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Added DiffLines:

* BloodKnight: King Ahab of Israel.
25th Nov '16 5:54:54 AM morane
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* HeroOfAnotherStory: King Ahab, who was the commander of the Levantine alliance against Assyria in the battle of Karkar 853 BC. The battle is not mentioned in the Bible, but Assyrian sources describe it, and also say "Ahab himself was worthy of 5,000 chariots alone".

to:

* HeroOfAnotherStory: King Ahab, who was the commander of the Levantine alliance against Assyria in the battle of Karkar 853 BC. The battle is not mentioned in the Bible, but Assyrian sources describe it, and also say "Ahab himself was worthy worth of [[BloodKnight 5,000 chariots alone".single-handed]]".
25th Nov '16 5:53:20 AM morane
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Added DiffLines:

* HeroOfAnotherStory: King Ahab, who was the commander of the Levantine alliance against Assyria in the battle of Karkar 853 BC. The battle is not mentioned in the Bible, but Assyrian sources describe it, and also say "Ahab himself was worthy of 5,000 chariots alone".
18th Nov '16 6:22:58 AM VicGeorge2011
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Added DiffLines:

* ZeroPercentApprovalRating: King Jehoram of Judah was recorded as having died "without being desired" in 2nd Chronicles 21:20, meaning that he was so unlikable as king that nobody was sad to see him go.
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