History Literature / BenHur

3rd Sep '17 12:08:26 PM WoozyJack
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** In the novel, the plot is kicked off when Judah accidentally knocks a roof tile on the head of a Roman centurion and gets arrested. In the movie, Judah's sister is the one who dislodges the roof tile, but Judah deliberately takes the blame in an attempt to spare his sister. (In the 1925 film it's Judah who knocks the tile.) In the novel, when Judah is on a sinking slave ship, and finds himself unchained, he gets off the ship. In the movie, Judah takes the opportunity to punch out a guard, steal his keys, and free all the other slaves on the ship, before escaping himself. In the 2016 film, Messala gets this, because the incident that kickstarts the plot is not a dislodged roof tile but [[spoiler:an actual assassination attempt of Pontius Pilate by a zealot firing an arrow from the top of the House of Hur. Messala even finds evidence that the Hurs had been harboring the zealot and nursing his wounds for some time.]] a fired arrow. This means that he actually has valid reason to do what he does to Judah and his entire family.
*** On top of that Messala is also shown questioning some of the orders of his superiors both in the Jewish revolt and other wars he is shown participating in against enemies of Rome and even does his best to find a favorable settlement between the Jews and the Romans. Also he is shown saving Ben-Hur in his childhood and later truly begs for forgiveness from Ben after the climatic chariot race that Ben chooses to rescue him in his crippled condition.

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** In the novel, the plot is kicked off when Judah accidentally knocks a roof tile on the head of a Roman centurion and gets arrested. In the movie, Judah's sister is the one who dislodges the roof tile, but Judah deliberately takes the blame in an attempt to spare his sister. (In the 1925 film it's Judah who knocks the tile.) In the novel, when Judah is on a sinking slave ship, and finds himself unchained, he gets off the ship. In the movie, Judah takes the opportunity to punch out a guard, steal his keys, and free all the other slaves on the ship, before escaping himself. In the 2016 film, Messala gets this, because the incident that kickstarts the plot is not a dislodged roof tile but [[spoiler:an actual assassination attempt of Pontius Pilate by a zealot firing an arrow from the top of the House of Hur. Messala even finds evidence that the Hurs had been harboring the zealot and nursing his wounds for some time.]] a fired arrow. This means that he actually has valid reason to do what he does to Judah and his entire family. \n*** On top of that Messala is also shown questioning some of the orders of his superiors both in the Jewish revolt and other wars he is shown participating in against enemies of Rome and even does his best to find a favorable settlement between the Jews and the Romans. Also he is shown saving Ben-Hur in his childhood and later truly begs for forgiveness from Ben after the climatic chariot race that Ben chooses to rescue him in his crippled condition.
3rd Sep '17 12:07:33 PM WoozyJack
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** In the novel, the plot is kicked off when Judah accidentally knocks a roof tile on the head of a Roman centurion and gets arrested. In the movie, Judah's sister is the one who dislodges the roof tile, but Judah deliberately takes the blame in an attempt to spare his sister. (In the 1925 film it's Judah who knocks the tile.) In the novel, when Judah is on a sinking slave ship, and finds himself unchained, he gets off the ship. In the movie, Judah takes the opportunity to punch out a guard, steal his keys, and free all the other slaves on the ship, before escaping himself. In the 2016 film, Messala gets this, because the incident that kickstarts the plot is not a dislodged roof tile but [[spoiler:an actual assassination attempt of Pontius Pilate by a zealot firing an arrow from the top of the House of Hur. Messala even finds evidence that the Hurs had been harboring the zealot and nursing his wounds for some time.]] This means that he actually has valid reason to do what he does to Judah and his family.

to:

** In the novel, the plot is kicked off when Judah accidentally knocks a roof tile on the head of a Roman centurion and gets arrested. In the movie, Judah's sister is the one who dislodges the roof tile, but Judah deliberately takes the blame in an attempt to spare his sister. (In the 1925 film it's Judah who knocks the tile.) In the novel, when Judah is on a sinking slave ship, and finds himself unchained, he gets off the ship. In the movie, Judah takes the opportunity to punch out a guard, steal his keys, and free all the other slaves on the ship, before escaping himself. In the 2016 film, Messala gets this, because the incident that kickstarts the plot is not a dislodged roof tile but [[spoiler:an actual assassination attempt of Pontius Pilate by a zealot firing an arrow from the top of the House of Hur. Messala even finds evidence that the Hurs had been harboring the zealot and nursing his wounds for some time.]] a fired arrow. This means that he actually has valid reason to do what he does to Judah and his entire family.
3rd Sep '17 12:05:52 PM WoozyJack
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** In the novel, the plot is kicked off when Judah accidentally knocks a roof tile on the head of a Roman centurion and gets arrested. In the movie, Judah's sister is the one who dislodges the roof tile, but Judah deliberately takes the blame in an attempt to spare his sister. (In the 1925 film it's Judah who knocks the tile.) In the novel, when Judah is on a sinking slave ship, and finds himself unchained, he gets off the ship. In the movie, Judah takes the opportunity to punch out a guard, steal his keys, and free all the other slaves on the ship, before escaping himself.
** In the 2016 film, Messala gets this, because the incident that kickstarts the plot is not a dislodged roof tile but [[spoiler:an actual assassination attempt of Pontius Pilate by a zealot firing an arrow from the top of the House of Hur. Messala even finds evidence that the Hurs had been harboring the zealot and nursing his wounds for some time.]] This means that he actually has valid reason to do what he does to Judah and his family.

to:

** In the novel, the plot is kicked off when Judah accidentally knocks a roof tile on the head of a Roman centurion and gets arrested. In the movie, Judah's sister is the one who dislodges the roof tile, but Judah deliberately takes the blame in an attempt to spare his sister. (In the 1925 film it's Judah who knocks the tile.) In the novel, when Judah is on a sinking slave ship, and finds himself unchained, he gets off the ship. In the movie, Judah takes the opportunity to punch out a guard, steal his keys, and free all the other slaves on the ship, before escaping himself.
**
himself. In the 2016 film, Messala gets this, because the incident that kickstarts the plot is not a dislodged roof tile but [[spoiler:an actual assassination attempt of Pontius Pilate by a zealot firing an arrow from the top of the House of Hur. Messala even finds evidence that the Hurs had been harboring the zealot and nursing his wounds for some time.]] This means that he actually has valid reason to do what he does to Judah and his family.
3rd Sep '17 12:04:55 PM WoozyJack
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** In the 2016 film, Messala gets this, because the incident that kickstarts the plot is not a dislodged roof tile but [[spoiler:an actual assassination attempt of Pontius Pilate by a zealot firing a arrow from the top of the House of Hur. Messala even finds evidence that the Hurs had been harboring the zealot and nursing his wounds for some time.]] This means that he actually has valid reason to do what he does to Judah and his family.

to:

** In the 2016 film, Messala gets this, because the incident that kickstarts the plot is not a dislodged roof tile but [[spoiler:an actual assassination attempt of Pontius Pilate by a zealot firing a an arrow from the top of the House of Hur. Messala even finds evidence that the Hurs had been harboring the zealot and nursing his wounds for some time.]] This means that he actually has valid reason to do what he does to Judah and his family.
19th Jul '17 12:08:48 AM jaydude1992
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Added DiffLines:

* [[ArtisticLicenseHistory Artistic License - History]]: Roman war galleys typically used teams of professional rowers or even ordinary soldiers to man their oars, rather than slaves or condemned men.
11th Jun '17 5:24:18 AM RoryKurago
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* AdaptationalSexuality: There is nothing to imply in the book that Judah and Messala were ever lovers meaning Judah was never bisexual in the book.

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* AdaptationalSexuality: YMMV. There is nothing to imply in the book to imply that that Judah and Messala were ever lovers meaning Judah was never bisexual in the book.lovers.
30th May '17 9:34:04 AM Saveelich
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Originally a novel by Lewis "Lew" Wallace, a Union general in the American Civil War and the Governor of New Mexico, published in 1880. It was later adapted for the stage, and there are at least three film versions: one classic silent film from 1925 starring Ramon Novarro, one classic Panavision extravaganza from 1959, and one remake from 2016 starring Jack Huston and Creator/MorganFreeman.

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Originally a novel by Lewis "Lew" Wallace, a Union general in the American Civil War and the Governor of New Mexico, published in 1880. It was later adapted for the stage, and there are at least three film versions: one classic silent film from 1925 starring Ramon Novarro, one classic Panavision extravaganza from 1959, and one remake from 2016 starring Jack Huston Huston, Creator/TobyKebbell and Creator/MorganFreeman.
27th Apr '17 7:23:00 PM MormonPazazu
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* AdaptationalBadass: In the 2016 film Messala's wartime experiences are shown via flashbacks and he is shown as a skilled swordsman and also a competent commander. He is so good that in one battle the general in charge even gives him direct command of the Roman army.

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* AdaptationalBadass: In the 2016 film Messala's wartime experiences are shown via flashbacks and he is shown as a skilled swordsman and also a competent commander. He is so good that in one battle the panicking Roman general in charge even gives him direct command of the Roman army.
27th Apr '17 7:22:28 PM MormonPazazu
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*** On top of that Messala is also shown questioning some of the orders of his superiors both in the Jewish revolt and other wars he is shown participating in against enemies of Rome and even does his best to find a favorable settlement between the Jews and the Romans. Also he is shown saving Ben-Hur in his childhood and later truly begs for forgiveness from Ben after the climatic chariot race.

to:

*** On top of that Messala is also shown questioning some of the orders of his superiors both in the Jewish revolt and other wars he is shown participating in against enemies of Rome and even does his best to find a favorable settlement between the Jews and the Romans. Also he is shown saving Ben-Hur in his childhood and later truly begs for forgiveness from Ben after the climatic chariot race.race that Ben chooses to rescue him in his crippled condition.
22nd Apr '17 10:22:56 AM mavacca
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Added DiffLines:

* ANaziByAnyOtherName: In the 2016 remake the Romans behave like this.
** Marcus Decimus dresses Messala down for having subjugated a village without razing it to the ground and killing all the inhabitants.
** The Romans desecrate an old Jewish cemetery by stealing the tombstones and using them to build their circus. [[LaserGuidedKarma The zealots are not happy...]]
** When the X Legion enters Jerusalem, it is preceded by soldiers who incite black dogs against the citizens.
** After Judah attacks Massala in the old Ben-Hur's house, Pilate orders a brutal reprisal. Twenty Jews are taken in the road and crucified.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.BenHur