History Literature / AWizardInRhyme

22nd Aug '17 1:44:23 PM Malady
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The series is relatively obscure--and, if truth be told, deservedly so. Books are a ClicheStorm: Matthew is set a task involving setting to rights another European country. He collects a RagTagBunchOfMisfits as he travels, often supplementing them with {{Public Domain Character}}s created through SummonMagic; most of them fade back into obscurity, though two from the first book, the BlackKnight, Sir Guy de [[BilingualBonus Toutarien]], and the dragon Stegoman, make repeat appearances. Matthew makes more study into the fabric of magic and Stasheff gets to soapbox about morality and virtue, whether in a Christian context or no. Main characters are flat, with secondaries having more interesting moments. So on.

The ''real'' reason tropers will want to check it out anyhow is that it is decidedly, deliberately, unabashedly {{Troperiffic}}. The TheoryOfNarrativeCausality is in full force, and characters are GenreSavvy enough to actively ''[[InvokedTrope invoke]]'' tropes if they stand to benefit from them (in the first book alone Princess Alisande calls upon "UnderdogsNeverLose" and "TheGoodGuysAlwaysWin"). The result is a PostModern series in the trappings of an HistoricalFantasy (complete with YeOldeButcheredEnglish, even though technically they are speaking French), a flood of classic poetry, and a series of {{Lampshade Hanging}}s which can only be described as loving.

to:

The series is relatively obscure--and, if truth be told, deservedly so.obscure. Books are a ClicheStorm: Matthew is set a task involving setting to rights another European country. He collects a RagTagBunchOfMisfits as he travels, often supplementing them with {{Public Domain Character}}s created through SummonMagic; most of them fade back into obscurity, though two from the first book, the BlackKnight, Sir Guy de [[BilingualBonus Toutarien]], and the dragon Stegoman, make repeat appearances. Matthew makes more study into the fabric of magic and Stasheff gets to soapbox about morality and virtue, whether in a Christian context or no. Main characters are flat, with secondaries having more interesting moments. So on.

The ''real'' reason tropers will want to check it out anyhow is that it It is decidedly, deliberately, unabashedly {{Troperiffic}}. The TheoryOfNarrativeCausality is in full force, and characters are GenreSavvy enough to actively ''[[InvokedTrope invoke]]'' ''{{invoke|dTrope}}'' tropes if they stand to benefit from them (in the first book alone Princess Alisande calls upon "UnderdogsNeverLose" and "TheGoodGuysAlwaysWin"). The result is a PostModern series in the trappings of an HistoricalFantasy (complete with YeOldeButcheredEnglish, even though technically they are speaking French), a flood of classic poetry, and a series of {{Lampshade Hanging}}s which can only be described as loving.



# Her Majesty's Wizard (1986)
# The Oathbound Wizard (1993)
# The Witch Doctor (1994)
# The Secular Wizard (1995)
# My Son, the Wizard (1997)
# The Haunted Wizard (1999)
# The Crusading Wizard (2000)
# The Feline Wizard (2000)



* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: Because magic in this setting is controlled by ExactWords, Matt has to be very careful with his phrasing. Otherwise, a spell to conjure fire can summon a [[BreathWeapon fire]]''[[InstantAwesomeJustAddDragons breather]]'', and and a [[HybridMonster Dracogriff]]-sized saddle can come out big enough for the ''Dracogriff'' to ride.
* BelligerentSexualTension: Matt and Alisande. They bicker and argue almost like an old married couple, call each other out on moments of weakness, and even after all is said and done in the first novel [[spoiler: [[CanNotSpitItOut Matt still has trouble admitting his feelings for her]]]].

to:

* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: Because magic in this setting is controlled by ExactWords, Matt has to be very careful with his phrasing. Otherwise, a spell to conjure fire can summon a [[BreathWeapon fire]]''[[InstantAwesomeJustAddDragons breather]]'', and and a [[HybridMonster Dracogriff]]-sized saddle can come out big enough for the ''Dracogriff'' to ride.
* BelligerentSexualTension: Matt and Alisande. They bicker and argue almost like an old married couple, call each other out on moments of weakness, and even after all is said and done in the first novel novel, [[spoiler: [[CanNotSpitItOut in a case of CanNotSpitItOut, Matt still has trouble admitting his feelings for her]]]].her]].



* IstanbulNotConstantinople: many names are traceable to influences in our history. Merovence, for instance, takes its name from the same [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merovingian_dynasty dynasty of French kings]] that [[Film/TheMatrix The Merovingian]] is named after.

to:

* IdiosyncraticEpisodeNaming: Each novel's title ends with "Wizard", except for "The Witch Doctor".
* IstanbulNotConstantinople: many Many names are traceable to influences in our history. Merovence, for instance, takes its name from the same [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merovingian_dynasty dynasty of French kings]] that [[Film/TheMatrix The Merovingian]] is named after.
15th Nov '16 1:58:15 PM slvstrChung
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* MeaningfulName: Sir Guy introduces himself in ''Her Majesty's Wizard'' as "Sir Guy Losobal," which Matt works out as the Merovencian equivalent to "Sir Guy, the Black Knight." Later on in the book, it's revealed that his real name is [[spoiler:Sir Guy de Toutarien. Toutarien = 'toute ou rien' (all or nothing); if evil completely takes over, it'll be his cue to rebuild Hardishane's empire.]]

to:

* MeaningfulName: Sir Guy introduces himself in ''Her Majesty's Wizard'' as "Sir Guy Losobal," which Matt works out as the Merovencian equivalent to "Sir Guy, the Black Knight." ("''Le sable'' would be how you say "the black" in French.) Later on in the book, it's revealed that his real name is [[spoiler:Sir Guy de Toutarien. Toutarien = 'toute ou rien' (all or nothing); if evil completely takes over, it'll be his cue to rebuild Hardishane's empire.]]
13th Aug '16 9:10:08 PM Fireblood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AlternateHistory: The timeline split when Romulus and Remus fought, in this version Remus won and Reme became famous for it's peacemaking and negotiation prowess.

to:

* AlternateHistory: The timeline split when Romulus and Remus fought, in fought. In this version Remus won and Reme became famous for it's peacemaking and negotiation prowess.
23rd Jul '16 9:58:58 AM ImpudentInfidel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* YearInsideHourOutside: at one point, Matthew returns to "our" dimension after five years in Merovence, to discover that it's been three days since he left.

to:

* YearInsideHourOutside: at one point, Matthew returns to "our" dimension after five years in Merovence, to discover that it's been three days since he left. This inches into NarniaTime territory, since Saul had been transported into Merovence searching for him after he'd been missing several days years previously from their perspective.
11th May '16 10:59:06 PM ImpudentInfidel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* RecycledScript: A weirdly blatant example, the Grendel scene from the second book is repeated verbatim in the third with the names changed to the closest equivalent in the new party even though it means the characters refer to and use abilities they don't actually have and ignore the ones they do.

to:

* RecycledScript: A weirdly blatant example, the Grendel scene from the second book is repeated verbatim in the third with the names changed to the closest equivalent in the new party even though it means the characters refer to and use abilities they don't actually have and ignore the ones they do. The troll trying to fly away is a highlight.
29th Apr '16 1:47:57 PM Doug86
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* PublicDomainCharacter: RobinHood and his Merry Men, Literature/DonQuixote, [[AMidsummerNightsDream Puck]], [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell%27s_demon Maxwell's demon]] and more.

to:

* PublicDomainCharacter: RobinHood and his Merry Men, Literature/DonQuixote, [[AMidsummerNightsDream [[Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream Puck]], [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell%27s_demon Maxwell's demon]] and more.
28th Feb '16 12:29:11 PM ImpudentInfidel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TrueNeutral: InvokedTrope. Saul is a major ally for the good guys and a hero in his own right, but he refuses to accept their religion or belief system in favor of systematically studying how magic ''really'' works in this setting, and makes sure to commit a "technical sin" (like eating meat on Friday) for every good deed he does.

to:

* TrueNeutral: InvokedTrope. Saul is a major ally for the good guys and a hero in his own right, but he refuses to accept their religion or belief system in favor of systematically studying how magic ''really'' works in this setting, and makes sure to commit a "technical sin" (like eating meat on Friday) for every good deed he does. The religious characters are rather bemused by this.
6th Feb '16 11:26:41 AM MacronNotes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* LikeADuckTakesToWater: Matthew and Saul. ([[spoiler:Later, Matt brings his parents over as well. They are just as proficient at magic as he is.]]) Having access to centuries of advances and examples in the art of poetry gives them a major advantage.



* TheUnfrozenCavemanLawyer: Matthew and Saul. ([[spoiler:Later, Matt brings his parents over as well. They are just as proficient at magic as he is.]]) Having access to centuries of advances and examples in the art of poetry gives them a major advantage.
1st Jun '15 6:13:29 AM ZedOmega
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* MeaningfulName: Sir Guy introduces himself in ''Her Majesty's Wizard'' as "Sir Guy Losobal," which Matt works out as the Merovencian equivalent to "Sir Guy, the Black Knight." Later on in the book, it's revealed that his real name is [[spoiler:Sir Guy de Toutarien. Toutarien = 'toute ou rien' (all or nothing); if evil completely takes over, it'll be his cue to rebuild Hardishane's empire.]]
16th May '15 11:18:33 PM ImpudentInfidel
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* RecycledScript: A weirdly blatant example, the Grendel scene from the second book is repeated verbatim in the third with the names changed to the closest equivalent in the new party even though it means the characters refer to and use abilities they don't actually have and ignore the ones they do.
This list shows the last 10 events of 38. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.AWizardInRhyme