History Literature / AClockWorkOrange

28th Sep '16 11:57:45 AM Korodzik
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* RefrainFromAssuming: The Ludovico treatment doesn't exist in RealLife. It was created by this novel.
24th Aug '16 5:17:08 PM DarkHunter
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** Within the book itself, it is used as a metaphor for the brainwashing procedure: a criminal who is conditioned to be sickened by violence is as unnatural as a clockwork orange... a machine imitating life, but not alive itself. A clockwork orange would be an utterly useless contraption (you can't eat it)... So too would the human robbed of free will be useless as a human being.

to:

** Within the book itself, it is used as a metaphor for the brainwashing procedure: a criminal who is conditioned to be sickened by violence is as unnatural as a clockwork orange... a machine imitating life, but not alive itself. A clockwork orange would be an utterly useless contraption (you can't eat it)...it, but oranges are only worth anything if they can be eaten)... So too would the human robbed of free will be useless as a human being.
6th Jul '16 4:57:40 PM kidlitfan
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** Meta-example: quite a few lewdies who've read the bookiwook
started govoreeting in nadsat talk, right right right?

to:

** Meta-example: quite a few lewdies who've read the bookiwook
bookiwook started govoreeting in nadsat talk, right right right?
6th Jul '16 4:55:30 PM kidlitfan
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** Meta-example: quite a few lewdies who've read the book started govoreeting in nadsat talk, right right right?

to:

** Meta-example: quite a few lewdies who've read the book bookiwook
started govoreeting in nadsat talk, right right right?
20th Jun '16 4:29:14 PM LittleGoat
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* EvenEvilHasStandards: The gangs may be brutal rapists and robbers, but they have a strict prohibition on having more than five members in each gang; Billy Boy has six, which is the main reason Alex holds him in such low regard. Also, itís implied they completely refuse to [[ThouShaltNotKill kill anyone]]; at any rate, Alex is [[VillainousBreakdown horrified]] when he learns [[spoiler:he accidentally killed the old woman he robbed]].

to:

* EvenEvilHasStandards: The gangs may be brutal rapists and robbers, but they have a strict prohibition on having more than five members in each gang; Billy Boy has six, which is the main reason Alex holds him in such low regard. Also, itís it's implied they completely refuse to [[ThouShaltNotKill kill anyone]]; at any rate, Alex is [[VillainousBreakdown horrified]] when he learns [[spoiler:he accidentally killed the old woman he robbed]].



* GotMeDoingIt: Alex is displeased when he notices he caught his parole officerís VerbalTic, yes?
** Meta-example: quite a few lewdies whoíve read the book started govoreeting in nadsat talk, right right right?

to:

* GotMeDoingIt: Alex is displeased when he notices he caught his parole officerís officer's VerbalTic, yes?
** Meta-example: quite a few lewdies whoíve who've read the book started govoreeting in nadsat talk, right right right?



* LoopholeAbuse: Alex and his droogs are underage, so they canít drink alcohol. [[NiceJobBreakingItHero They drink milk with drugs that make them super-violent instead]].

to:

* LoopholeAbuse: Alex and his droogs are underage, so they canít can't drink alcohol. [[NiceJobBreakingItHero They drink milk with drugs that make them super-violent instead]].



** Burgess adapted it into a play for the express purpose of making sure that no-one else would, as they would surely take the film version as their source. To distance it as far as possible he actually made it a musical, much of the dialogue taking its metre from the works of Beethoven, and the play has it's definite end where the author intended, Alex growing up and getting bored with youthful madness. It even includes a fantastic summation to the play's intended message to the tune of the fifth symphony (which you'll find in the quotes section). The script even suggests that a man dressed as Stanley Kubrick should come onstage trying to sing "Singing in the Rain" as a counterpoint, [[TakeThat and get lynched by the rest of the cast]].

to:

** Burgess adapted it into a play for the express purpose of making sure that no-one else would, as they would surely take the film version as their source. To distance it as far as possible he actually made it a musical, much of the dialogue taking its metre from the works of Beethoven, and the play has it's its definite end where the author intended, Alex growing up and getting bored with youthful madness. It even includes a fantastic summation to the play's intended message to the tune of the fifth symphony (which you'll find in the quotes section). The script even suggests that a man dressed as Stanley Kubrick should come onstage trying to sing "Singing in the Rain" as a counterpoint, [[TakeThat and get lynched by the rest of the cast]].



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8th Dec '15 7:24:26 PM Fireblood
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* KarmaHoudini: Alex receives a lot of punishment through the second and third acts, but ultimately gets away with his freedom. In the American and film he smugly celebrates his return to violence, while in the British book he settles down with a cooshy government job.

to:

* KarmaHoudini: Alex receives a lot of punishment through the second and third acts, but ultimately gets away with his freedom. In the American edition and film he smugly celebrates his return to violence, while in the British book he settles down with a cooshy cushy government job.



* LoudOfWar: The fact Alex finds classical music unbearable after being subjected to the brainwash is exploited by [[spoiler:the writer whom Alex and his gang attacked and forced to watch his wife get raped]].

to:

* LoudOfWar: The fact Alex finds classical music unbearable after being subjected to the brainwash is exploited by [[spoiler:the writer whom Alex and his gang attacked and forced to watch his wife get be raped]].



** It's probably no coincidence that the writer and his wife are Mr and Mrs ''Alexander''.

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** It's probably no coincidence that the writer and his wife are Mr Mr. and Mrs Mrs. ''Alexander''.



* MindRape: The Ludovico treatment... which is creepily similar to the Real-Life [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aversion_therapy Aversive therapy]].

to:

* MindRape: The Ludovico treatment... treatment, which is creepily similar to an extremely creepy version of the Real-Life [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aversion_therapy Aversive therapy]].aversion therapy]] taken UpToEleven beyond any actual (known) examples.



* RealMenWearPink: Alex and his gang wear certain effeminate details of makeup; fake eyelashes on one eye (Alex), Mascara (Georgie), rouge (Petey) and lipstick (Dim). As seen in the Korova Milk Bar, this is the reigning fashion of their set.

to:

* RealMenWearPink: Alex and his gang wear certain effeminate details of makeup; fake eyelashes on one eye (Alex), Mascara mascara (Georgie), rouge (Petey) and lipstick (Dim). As seen in the Korova Milk Bar, this is the reigning fashion of their set.



* RestrainingBolt: The Ludovico treatment is an aversion therapy that causes Alex to suffer intense physical pain whenever he thinks about violence or rape, with the unintended inclusion of certain types of music.

to:

* RestrainingBolt: The Ludovico treatment is an aversion therapy that causes Alex to suffer intense physical pain whenever he thinks about violence or rape, committing acts of violence, with the unintended inclusion of certain types of music.



* SocialServicesDoesNotExist: Averted insofar as Alex is assigned to regular meetings with one (P.R. Deltoid). On the other hand, Deltoid has a severe case of AdultsAreUseless, and later turns on Alex, who enjoyed jerking him around a little too obviously when he was a client.

to:

* SocialServicesDoesNotExist: Averted {{Averted}} insofar as Alex is assigned to regular meetings with one (P.R. Deltoid). On the other hand, Deltoid has a severe case of AdultsAreUseless, and later turns on Alex, who enjoyed jerking him around a little too obviously when he was a client.



** Within the book itself, it is used as a metaphor for the brainwashing procedure: a criminal who is conditioned to be sickened by violence is as unnatural as a clockwork orange... a machine imitating life, but not alive itself. A clockwork orange would be an utterly useless contraption (you can't eat it)... so to would the human robbed of free will be useless as a human being.
* WouldHurtAChild: In a particularly disturbing chapter in Part I, Alex lures two 10-year-old girls back to his flat and proceeds to drug and rape them. Earlier, before Alex and his droogs interrupt, Billyboy and his gang are fixing to gang-rape a ten year old girl.

to:

** Within the book itself, it is used as a metaphor for the brainwashing procedure: a criminal who is conditioned to be sickened by violence is as unnatural as a clockwork orange... a machine imitating life, but not alive itself. A clockwork orange would be an utterly useless contraption (you can't eat it)... so to So too would the human robbed of free will be useless as a human being.
* WouldHurtAChild: In a particularly disturbing chapter in Part I, Alex lures two 10-year-old ten-year-old girls back to his flat and proceeds to drug and rape them. Earlier, before Alex and his droogs interrupt, Billyboy Billy Boy and his gang are fixing to gang-rape a ten year old ten-year-old girl.



** The 21st chapter shows Alex [[spoiler:matured to the point where he wants to end his violent ways and have a family]]. This after displaying all the signs of a psychopath- deriving joy from causing pain, total disregard for the consequences of his actions, and a complete lack of empathy for others- for the previous 20 chapters.
** Burgess adapted it into a play for the express purpose of making sure that no-one else would, as they would surely take the film version as their source. To distance it as far as possible he actually made it a musical, much of the dialogue taking its metre from the works of Beethoven, and the play has it's definite end where the author intended, Alex growing up and getting bored with youthful madness. It even includes a fantastic summation to the play's intended message to the tune of the fifth sympthony (which you'll find in the quotes section). The script even suggests that a man dressed as Stanley Kubrick should come onstage trying to sing "Singing in the Rain" as a counterpoint, [[TakeThat and get lynched by the rest of the cast]].

to:

** The 21st chapter shows Alex [[spoiler:matured to the point where he wants to end his violent ways and have a family]]. This after displaying all the signs of a psychopath- deriving joy from causing pain, total disregard for the consequences of his actions, and a complete lack of empathy for others- for others-for the previous 20 chapters.
** Burgess adapted it into a play for the express purpose of making sure that no-one else would, as they would surely take the film version as their source. To distance it as far as possible he actually made it a musical, much of the dialogue taking its metre from the works of Beethoven, and the play has it's definite end where the author intended, Alex growing up and getting bored with youthful madness. It even includes a fantastic summation to the play's intended message to the tune of the fifth sympthony symphony (which you'll find in the quotes section). The script even suggests that a man dressed as Stanley Kubrick should come onstage trying to sing "Singing in the Rain" as a counterpoint, [[TakeThat and get lynched by the rest of the cast]].
8th Dec '15 7:02:56 PM Fireblood
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* ForTheEvulz: The whole reason for the old Ultraviolence.

to:

* ForTheEvulz: The whole reason for the old Ultraviolence.ultraviolence.
8th Dec '15 7:02:29 PM Fireblood
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* EvilVersusEvil: The "[[VillainProtagonist hero]]" is a violent, sadistic sociopath; the government that apprehends him is a corrupt regime that's halfway down the road to becoming a totalitarian police state, and the revolutionaries are [[spoiler:willing to drive a man to suicide for their own political agenda]]. Also, the gangs in his world often fight one another, and the book features a fight between Alex gang and a rival one lead by Billy Boy.

to:

* EvilVersusEvil: The "[[VillainProtagonist hero]]" is a violent, sadistic sociopath; the government that apprehends him is a corrupt regime that's halfway down the road to becoming a totalitarian police state, and the revolutionaries are [[spoiler:willing to drive a man to suicide for their own political agenda]]. Also, the gangs in his world often fight one another, and the book features a fight between Alex gang and a rival one lead led by Billy Boy.
8th Dec '15 6:50:05 PM Fireblood
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Things are going swimmingly for Alex until his gang begins to chafe under his leadership. Alex is still content with pointless violence, but the gang is starting to grow up and think about making a profit. After a fight for supremacy, he reasserts himself as the leader, but bows to the gang's interest in robbing a wealthy widow's house. Alex takes the lead in the robbery, but the widow discovers him, leading to a fight. As the gang flees, they betray Alex and leave him for the police to apprehend. At the station, the police inform Alex that the widow died of her injuries, making him a murderer. He is quickly sentenced to a lengthy prison term.

to:

Things are going swimmingly for Alex until his gang begins to chafe under his leadership. Alex is still content with pointless violence, but the gang is starting to grow up and think about making a profit. After a fight for supremacy, he reasserts himself as the leader, but bows to the gang's interest in robbing a wealthy widow's house. Alex takes the lead in the robbery, but the widow discovers him, leading to a fight. As the gang flees, they betray Alex and leave him for the police to apprehend. At the station, the police inform Alex that the widow died of her injuries, making him a murderer. He is quickly convicted and sentenced to a lengthy prison term.



* TheBadGuyWins : The repressive government persuades a still dazed post-treatment-reversal Alex to do a deal with them to make his story positive publicity for them.

to:

* TheBadGuyWins : TheBadGuyWins: The repressive government persuades a still dazed post-treatment-reversal Alex to do a deal with them to make his story positive publicity for them.



** Alex's nadsat slang is partially based on crudely anglicized Russian, so Russian-speakers might better understand it from the onset. However, part of the fun for some readers is learning the argot as they go along.

to:

** Alex's nadsat slang is partially based on crudely anglicized Russian, so Russian-speakers Russian speakers might better understand it from the onset. However, part of the fun for some readers is learning the argot as they go along.
9th Oct '15 11:28:16 AM TrollBrutal
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''[[TheStinger Who let the]] [[{{Pun}} droogs]] [[Memes/{{Music}} out?]] [[EarWorm/{{Music}} (Who, who, who, who...)]]''
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