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History Leitmotif / Theatre

6th May '16 10:24:29 PM ClockStopping
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** King George III gets ''You'll Be Back'', which is reprised in shorter form but otherwise pretty much identically in melody by ''What Comes Next?'' and ''I Know Him'', each of which also all begin with the line "They say..."

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** King George III gets ''You'll Be Back'', which is reprised in shorter form but otherwise pretty much identically in melody by ''What Comes Next?'' and ''I Know Him'', each of which also all begin with the line "They say..."" and include the line "Oceans rise, empires fall..."
** There's also the duel theme - ''The Ten Duel Commandments'' is reprised in its entirety, with only mostly different lyrics, in the first part of ''The World Was Wide Enough''; also, the last part involving the chorus counting to nine (to verbalise the 'take ten paces then fire' rule) also appears in ''Blow Us All Away''. However, that last one is kind of special, because Phillip is also associated with counting to nine in another way - ''Take a Break'' has him playing piano and practicing French counting with his mother. [[spoiler:In ''Blow Us All Away'', however, the counting doesn't quite reach nine - and neither does Phillip when he and Eliza tearfully reprise their counting practice in ''Stay Alive (Reprise)'' as he dies.]]
** ''The Story of Tonight'' also stands for both death and the relationship between the revolutionary crew, particularly Laurens and Hamilton - it's reprised cheerily in ''The Story of Tonight (Reprise)'', demonstrating their friendship, but when much more sadly in ''Tomorrow There'll Be More of Us'' (a musical-only song cut from the soundtrack showing [[spoiler:Hamilton finding out about Laurens' death]]), and then the single line "Raise a glass to freedom...", Laurens' first line from ''The Story of Tonight'', is Hamilton's final line in the entire show in ''The World Was Wide Enough''.
6th May '16 8:27:28 PM ClockStopping
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** The line "Alexander Hamilton" is repeated with the same riff in ''Alexander Hamilton'', ''Satisfied'', and ''What'd I Miss'', each time ignoring the preceding melody, to demonstrate Hamilton's self-confidence and individuality (notably, while the line is spoken in ''Aaron Burr, Sir'' it does not use the same riff, because Hamilton is still a bit too young and uncertain of himself here).
** Eliza is associated with a number of recurring melodies: she starts off with "Look around, look around, at how lucky we are to be alive right now!" from ''The Schuyler Sisters'' which is reprised in ''Take a Break'', with different words in ''Schuyler Defeated'' ("Further down, further down..." - the song is also a general reprise of ''The Schuyler Sisters''), by Hamilton towards her in both ''Non-Stop'' and ''It's Quiet Uptown'', and most notably in ''That Would Be Enough'', where that titular line becomes another associated riff which is also repeated in ''Non-Stop'' and ''It's Quiet Uptown''. She also gets "Helpless" to represent her feelings for Hamilton, which comes from ''Helpless'' and is repeated by her in ''Non-Stop'', and then is also repeated by Maria when Hamilton has his affair in ''Say No To This''.

to:

** The line "Alexander Hamilton" is repeated with the same riff in ''Alexander Hamilton'', ''Satisfied'', and ''What'd I Miss'', each time ignoring the preceding melody, to demonstrate Hamilton's self-confidence and individuality (notably, while the line is spoken in ''Aaron Burr, Sir'' it does not use the same riff, because Hamilton is still a bit too young and uncertain of himself here).
here). He's also associated with the line "Why do you write like you're running out of time?" - ''Non-Stop'' includes it and many variations and ''Best of Wives, Best of Women'' repeats it; while ''Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story'' doesn't include the full line, is does have a repeated refrain of simply the word "Time" which is clearly meant to link back to the previous lines as one of Hamilton's major themes.
** Eliza is associated with a number of recurring melodies: she starts off with "Look around, look around, at how lucky we are to be alive right now!" from ''The Schuyler Sisters'' which is reprised in ''Take a Break'', with different words in ''Schuyler Defeated'' ("Further down, further down..." - the song is also a general reprise of ''The Schuyler Sisters''), by Hamilton towards her in both ''Non-Stop'' and ''It's Quiet Uptown'', and most notably in ''That Would Be Enough'', where that titular line becomes another associated riff which is also repeated in ''Non-Stop'' and ''Non-Stop'', ''It's Quiet Uptown''.Uptown'', and ''Best of Wives, Best of Women''. She also gets "Helpless" to represent her feelings for Hamilton, which comes from ''Helpless'' and is repeated by her in ''Non-Stop'', and then is also repeated by Maria when Hamilton has his affair in ''Say No To This''. Finally, in ''That Would Be Enough'' she states the line "Let me be a part of the narrative," which [[DarkReprise becomes]] "I'm erasing myself from the narrative" in ''Burn'', [[TriumphantReprise and then]] "I put myself back in the narrative" in ''Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story?''



** Washington is associated with the riff ''History has its eyes on you'', beginning in the song of the same name, and then reprised in ''Non-Stop'' and ''One Last Time''. However, as the line was originally spoken to Hamilton, the line is also associated with him even when Washington isn't around, most notably in ''Hurricane''.

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** Washington is associated with the riff ''History "History has its eyes on you'', you", beginning in the song of the same name, and then reprised in ''Non-Stop'' and ''One Last Time''. However, as the line was originally spoken to Hamilton, the line is also associated with him even when Washington isn't around, most notably in ''Hurricane''.
6th May '16 8:09:51 PM ClockStopping
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* ''Theatre/{{Hamilton}}'' has a ''huge'' number of small leitmotifs, to the extent that practically every song either reprises or is reprised by some other song in at least a line or two. Some of the most major ones are:
** The opening sequence "How does a bastard, orphan, son of a whore and a Scotsman..." is reprised in ''A Winter's Ball'', ''Guns and Ships'', ''What'd I Miss'', and then [[DarkReprise darkly]] in ''Your Obedient Servant'', always serving as Burr narrating about either Hamilton himself of something or someone comparable to him.

to:

* ''Theatre/{{Hamilton}}'' has a ''huge'' number of small leitmotifs, to the extent that practically every song either reprises or is reprised by some other song in at least a line or two. Some Most of the most major ones are:
** The opening sequence "How does a bastard, orphan, son of a whore and a Scotsman..." is reprised in ''A Winter's Ball'', ''Guns and Ships'', ''What'd I Miss'', ''The Adams Administration'' and then [[DarkReprise darkly]] in ''Your Obedient Servant'', always serving as Burr narrating about either Hamilton himself of or something or someone comparable to associated with him.



** Eliza is associated with a number of recurring melodies: she starts off with "Look around, look around, at how lucky we are to be alive right now!" which is reprised in ''Non-Stop'', ''Take a Break'', with different words in ''Schuyler Defeated'' ("Further down, further down..."), and most notably in ''That Would Be Enough'', where that titular line becomes another associated riff. She also gets "Helpless" to represent her feelings for Hamilton, which comes from ''Helpless'' and is repeated by her in ''Non-Stop'', and then is also repeated by Maria when Hamilton has his affair in ''Say No To This''.

to:

** Eliza is associated with a number of recurring melodies: she starts off with "Look around, look around, at how lucky we are to be alive right now!" from ''The Schuyler Sisters'' which is reprised in ''Non-Stop'', ''Take a Break'', with different words in ''Schuyler Defeated'' ("Further down, further down..."), " - the song is also a general reprise of ''The Schuyler Sisters''), by Hamilton towards her in both ''Non-Stop'' and ''It's Quiet Uptown'', and most notably in ''That Would Be Enough'', where that titular line becomes another associated riff.riff which is also repeated in ''Non-Stop'' and ''It's Quiet Uptown''. She also gets "Helpless" to represent her feelings for Hamilton, which comes from ''Helpless'' and is repeated by her in ''Non-Stop'', and then is also repeated by Maria when Hamilton has his affair in ''Say No To This''.



** Burr is associated with the line "Talk less, smile more" from ''Aaron Burr, Sir'' reprised by Alexander in ''The Room Where It Happened'' ("I guess I'll finally have to listen to you...") and then by himself again in ''The Election of 1800''. He's also associated with the line ''Wait for it'', always sung by back-up singers, which begins in "Wait For It" and is reprised in ''Non-Stop'' and ''The Room Where It Happened''.
** Washington is associated with the riff "History has its eyes on you", beginning in the song of the same name, and then reprised in "Non-Stop" and ''One Last Time''.

to:

** Burr is associated with the line "Talk less, smile more" from ''Aaron Burr, Sir'' reprised by Alexander in ''The Room Where It Happened'' ("I guess I'll finally have to listen to you...") and then by himself again in ''The Election of 1800''. He's also associated with the line ''Wait for it'', always sung by back-up singers, which begins in "Wait For It" and is reprised in ''Non-Stop'' and ''The Room Where It Happened''.
Happened''. Interestingly, the line is also repeated in ''Hurricane'', but seemingly only to contrast Burr's approach to Hamilton's, as this is very much Hamilton's song.
** Washington is associated with the riff "History ''History has its eyes on you", you'', beginning in the song of the same name, and then reprised in "Non-Stop" ''Non-Stop'' and ''One Last Time''.Time''. However, as the line was originally spoken to Hamilton, the line is also associated with him even when Washington isn't around, most notably in ''Hurricane''.



** King George III gets ''You'll Be Back'', which is reprised in shorter form but otherwise pretty much identically in melody by in ''What Comes Next?'' and ''I Know Him'', each of which also all begin with the line "They say..."

to:

** Phillip is associated with the line "Blow us all away" from ''Dear Theodosia'', reprised in - of course! - ''Blow Us All Away''. He also reprises Hamilton's [[IAmGreatSong "I Am Great!" segment]] from ''My Shot'' to demonstrate his similarity to him - and, perhaps, [[spoiler:that he was equally doomed to die in a duel, as ''My Shot'' also contains the verse associated with Hamilton's death - "I imagine death so much it feels more like a memory..." which is repeated more triumphantly in ''The Battle of Yorktown'' and then darkly in ''The World Was Wide Enough''.]]
** King George III gets ''You'll Be Back'', which is reprised in shorter form but otherwise pretty much identically in melody by in ''What Comes Next?'' and ''I Know Him'', each of which also all begin with the line "They say..."
6th May '16 7:51:09 PM ClockStopping
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** Eliza is associated with a number of recurring melodies: she starts off with "Look around, look around, at how lucky we are to be alive right now!" which is reprised a number of times, most notably in ''That Would Be Enough'', where that titular line becomes another associated riff. She also gets "Helpless" to represent her feelings for Hamilton, which comes from ''Helpless'' and is repeated by her in ''Non-Stop'', and then is also repeated by Maria when Hamilton has his affair in ''Say No To This''.
** Angelica has "__ will never be satisfied" from ''Satisfied'', reprised in ''Non-Stop'', and then [[DarkReprise darkly]] in ''The Reynolds Pamphlet''.

to:

** Eliza is associated with a number of recurring melodies: she starts off with "Look around, look around, at how lucky we are to be alive right now!" which is reprised in ''Non-Stop'', ''Take a number of times, Break'', with different words in ''Schuyler Defeated'' ("Further down, further down..."), and most notably in ''That Would Be Enough'', where that titular line becomes another associated riff. She also gets "Helpless" to represent her feelings for Hamilton, which comes from ''Helpless'' and is repeated by her in ''Non-Stop'', and then is also repeated by Maria when Hamilton has his affair in ''Say No To This''.
** Angelica has "__ "I/he/you will never be satisfied" from ''Satisfied'', reprised in ''Non-Stop'', and then [[DarkReprise darkly]] in ''The Reynolds Pamphlet''.


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** King George III gets ''You'll Be Back'', which is reprised in shorter form but otherwise pretty much identically in melody by in ''What Comes Next?'' and ''I Know Him'', each of which also all begin with the line "They say..."
6th May '16 7:30:54 PM ClockStopping
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----

to:

* ''Theatre/{{Hamilton}}'' has a ''huge'' number of small leitmotifs, to the extent that practically every song either reprises or is reprised by some other song in at least a line or two. Some of the most major ones are:
** The opening sequence "How does a bastard, orphan, son of a whore and a Scotsman..." is reprised in ''A Winter's Ball'', ''Guns and Ships'', ''What'd I Miss'', and then [[DarkReprise darkly]] in ''Your Obedient Servant'', always serving as Burr narrating about either Hamilton himself of something or someone comparable to him.
** The line "Alexander Hamilton" is repeated with the same riff in ''Alexander Hamilton'', ''Satisfied'', and ''What'd I Miss'', each time ignoring the preceding melody, to demonstrate Hamilton's self-confidence and individuality (notably, while the line is spoken in ''Aaron Burr, Sir'' it does not use the same riff, because Hamilton is still a bit too young and uncertain of himself here).
** Eliza is associated with a number of recurring melodies: she starts off with "Look around, look around, at how lucky we are to be alive right now!" which is reprised a number of times, most notably in ''That Would Be Enough'', where that titular line becomes another associated riff. She also gets "Helpless" to represent her feelings for Hamilton, which comes from ''Helpless'' and is repeated by her in ''Non-Stop'', and then is also repeated by Maria when Hamilton has his affair in ''Say No To This''.
** Angelica has "__ will never be satisfied" from ''Satisfied'', reprised in ''Non-Stop'', and then [[DarkReprise darkly]] in ''The Reynolds Pamphlet''.
** Burr is associated with the line "Talk less, smile more" from ''Aaron Burr, Sir'' reprised by Alexander in ''The Room Where It Happened'' ("I guess I'll finally have to listen to you...") and then by himself again in ''The Election of 1800''. He's also associated with the line ''Wait for it'', always sung by back-up singers, which begins in "Wait For It" and is reprised in ''Non-Stop'' and ''The Room Where It Happened''.
** Washington is associated with the riff "History has its eyes on you", beginning in the song of the same name, and then reprised in "Non-Stop" and ''One Last Time''.
** Jefferson is associated mainly with riffs from ''Washington on Your Side'', one of the latest songs to have reprises - the opening section is reprised by himself again in ''The Election of 1800'', and the final coda of the song is reprised by Hamilton when he endorses Jefferson later in the same song. There's also a short riff from the song in ''What'd I Miss?'', though it's not obvious unless you're listening closely.
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31st Dec '15 8:46:49 PM Prfnoff
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* Benjamin Britten's ''Albert Herring'' has a few of these:

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* Benjamin Britten's ''Albert Herring'' ''Theatre/AlbertHerring'' has a few of these:


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** Sid's whistling at Nancy is a motif played on the violin more times than actually whistled by Sid.
24th Nov '15 10:31:30 PM wolftickets1969
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* In ''Theatre/{{Matilda}}'', "Naughty" is this for the title character. The [[ShowWithinAShow Story Within a Story]] has leitmotifs for the Escapologist and Acrobat, as well as their daughter. The last of these is reprised WithLyrics in "My House", where we find out that the daughter was actually Miss Honey.

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* In ''Theatre/{{Matilda}}'', "Naughty" is this for the title character. The [[ShowWithinAShow Story Within a Story]] has leitmotifs for the Escapologist and Acrobat, as well as and later, their daughter. The last of these is reprised WithLyrics in "My House", where we find out that the daughter was actually Miss Honey.
24th Nov '15 10:28:42 PM wolftickets1969
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Theatre/{{Matilda}}'', "Naughty" is this for the title character. The [[ShowWithinAShow Story Within a Story]] has leitmotifs for the Escapologist and Acrobat, as well as their daughter. The last of these is reprised WithLyrics in "My House", where we find out that the daughter was actually Miss Honey.
6th Nov '15 1:19:19 PM Morgenthaler
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* In the musical {{RENT}}, there's a little musical theme that is played every time Collins come onstage, and it's a good part of the melody/background music in his song "Santa Fe." Also repeated when singing about [[spoiler:the dead]] Angel later.

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* In the musical {{RENT}}, ''Theatre/{{RENT}}'', there's a little musical theme that is played every time Collins come onstage, and it's a good part of the melody/background music in his song "Santa Fe." Also repeated when singing about [[spoiler:the dead]] Angel later.



* Composer Michael John [=LaChiusa=] makes frequent use of motifs, especially in ''[[LaRonde Hello Again]]'' (with characters echoing sentiments expressed by others), and in ''Marie Christine'' (in which an eerie tritone set to the word "beautiful" and "arrogance" is frequently repeated.)

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* Composer Michael John [=LaChiusa=] makes frequent use of motifs, especially in ''[[LaRonde ''[[Theatre/LaRonde Hello Again]]'' (with characters echoing sentiments expressed by others), and in ''Marie Christine'' (in which an eerie tritone set to the word "beautiful" and "arrogance" is frequently repeated.)



* Stravinsky's music for the ballet ''TheFirebird'' is heavily leitmotif-laden. There are identifiable themes for the Firebird, the villain, the hero, the princess, and the villain's monster guardians.

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* Stravinsky's music for the ballet ''TheFirebird'' ''Theatre/TheFirebird'' is heavily leitmotif-laden. There are identifiable themes for the Firebird, the villain, the hero, the princess, and the villain's monster guardians.
12th Jul '15 8:56:33 PM RochuBlack
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Added DiffLines:

**Also the melody from "I Should Tell You", that shows up numerous times before and after the song itself, related to secrets and (mostly) Roger's uncertanity.
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