History Horrible / LiveActionTV

23rd Jun '17 2:38:18 AM GiantJumboJellyfish
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* Back in 1989, when Canvas was known as BRTN [=TV2=], they released '''''Container''''' that was promoted as a 'philosophical' talk show, and is possibly the worst of its kind. It was mainly despised for being absolutely incomprehensible if you weren't intellectual, and despised by that particular target group for encompassing every single negative stereotype attached to intellectuals. One can clearly see that both the people who were talking as well as the host barely knew what they were talking about and shared their ideas right on the spot, trying to hide their lack of knowledge by quoting art critics, reviewing paintings and showing clips of films, which results in enough wall bangers to destroy the very wall you are trying to bang on and enough idiocy to make you feel like you got dumber. It is quite telling that critics were comparing its content to conversations that you could have in a simple café and that later ones called it an example of reality-tv. While there were plenty of shows that were already blamed for only appealing to the LowestCommonDenominator on VTM, which launched on the February of the same year, this show was something so horrible that its horribleness started very hefty debates about whether or not a show like this one should be allowed to air on television, with even the ones that would allow this show on television agreeing that it was horrible. An entire thesis paper was even made around it. It was ultimately cancelled after 10 episodes and now only the very first episode has survived because cobra, which is the national art movement, insisted to preserve an episode of the show because there has never been quite something like this on Belgian television. Thus it can be viewed on its official website together with all the negative criticism the show received just below it. Sadly it also ended up being one of the reasons why Canvas would become stereotyped as only appealing to intellectuals, which is an especially painful move with recent competition right along the corner.

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* Back in In 1989, when Canvas was (then known as BRTN [=TV2=], they released [=TV2=]) broadcast '''''Container''''' that which was promoted as a 'philosophical' talk show, and is possibly the worst of its kind. It was mainly despised for being absolutely incomprehensible if you weren't an intellectual, and despised by that particular target group intellectuals themselves for encompassing every single negative stereotype attached to intellectuals. them. One can could clearly see that both the people who were talking as well as the guests and host barely knew what they were talking about and shared their ideas right on the spot, trying to hide their lack of knowledge by quoting art critics, reviewing paintings and showing clips of films, which results in enough wall bangers to destroy the very wall you are trying to bang on and enough idiocy to did nothing more than make you the viewer feel like you got dumber. It is quite telling that Tellingly, critics were comparing its content compared the show to conversations that you could have in a simple café and that while later ones called it an example of reality-tv. RealityTV. While there were plenty of shows that were already blamed panned for only appealing to the LowestCommonDenominator on competitor VTM, which launched on the February of the same year, this show was something so horrible bad that its horribleness started it caused very hefty debates about whether or not a show like this one it should be allowed to air on television, with even the ones that those who would allow this show on television it to be shown agreeing that it was horrible.crap. An entire thesis paper was even made around it. It was ultimately cancelled after 10 episodes and now with only the very first episode has survived surviving because cobra, which is the [=CoBrA=], a national art movement, insisted to preserve on preserving an episode of the show because there has had never been quite something like this it on Belgian television. Thus it It can be viewed on its their official website together with all the negative criticism the show received just below it. Sadly Sadly, it also ended up being one of the reasons why Canvas would become stereotyped as only appealing to intellectuals, which is an especially painful move with recent since new competition was right along the corner.
corner.

15th Jun '17 6:36:39 PM Scifimaster92
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* On paper, adapting UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill's four-volume ''A History of the English-Speaking Peoples'' into the 1974-75 miniseries '''''Churchill's People''''' seemed like a winning formula for a big dramatic prestige project. In practice, the books focus far more on political and military minutiae than on narrative,[[note]] Churchill's political rival UsefulNotes/ClementAttlee quipped that the books should have been called ''Things in History That Interested Me''.[[/note]] forcing the writers to invent their own characters and stories to bring key moments in the history of Britain and its former colonies to life, and the quality of the scripts varied hugely (with many characters speaking almost entirely in InfoDump monologues), as did the quality of the performances despite the veritable "who's who" of acting talent across the series.[[note]] Just to give a sample: Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/PatrickTroughton, Dennis Waterman, Anna Massey, Leo [=McKern=], Edward Fox, Gemma Jones, [[Series/BlakesSeven Gareth Thomas, Paul Darrow,]] Rita Webb, Creator/PatrickStewart, Ian Hendry, Polly James, and Peter Bowles all appeared in different episodes.[[/note]] But by far the worst problem was the tiny budget (slashed as a result of the energy crisis to just £1.25 million for 26 episodes), which forced the episodes to be shot entirely on cheap studio sets, even for outdoor scenes. The result was a series that was both suffocatingly dull and embarrassingly low grade. Critics had their knives out immediately; ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster"[[note]] The co-producer was Time-Life Productions, who planned to air the series on Creator/{{PBS}} - to similarly dismal returns.[[/note]] that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too," while Nancy Banks-Smith in ''The Guardian'' described it as having "little to offer us but blood, horsehair, and history. Though a hell of a lot of each." Though it was originally scheduled for Mondays at 9:25pm, rapidly plummeting audience figures (down to a pathetic 1 million by Episode 9) forced the BBC to cut their losses by putting ''Series/{{Kojak}}'' in the time slot instead and burning off the rest of ''Churchill's People'' in a graveyard slot. It has never been repeated or released on DVD.

to:

* On paper, adapting UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill's four-volume ''A History of the English-Speaking Peoples'' into the 1974-75 miniseries '''''Churchill's People''''' seemed like a winning formula for a big dramatic prestige project. In practice, the books focus far more on political and military minutiae than on narrative,[[note]] Churchill's political rival UsefulNotes/ClementAttlee quipped that the books should have been called ''Things in History That Interested Me''.[[/note]] forcing the writers to invent their own characters and stories to bring key moments in the history of Britain and its former colonies to life, and the quality of the scripts varied hugely (with many characters speaking almost entirely in InfoDump monologues), as did the quality of the performances despite the veritable "who's who" of acting talent across the series.[[note]] Just to give a sample: Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/PatrickTroughton, [[Series/TheSweeney Dennis Waterman, Waterman]], Anna Massey, Leo [=McKern=], [[Film/TheDayOfTheJackal Edward Fox, Fox]], [[Film/HarryPotterAndTheChamberOfSecrets Gemma Jones, Jones]], [[Series/BlakesSeven Gareth Thomas, Paul Darrow,]] Rita Webb, Creator/PatrickStewart, [[Series/TheAvengers Ian Hendry, Hendry]], Polly James, and Peter Bowles all appeared in different episodes.[[/note]] But by far the worst problem was the tiny budget (slashed as a result of the energy crisis to just £1.25 million for 26 episodes), which forced the episodes to be shot entirely on cheap studio sets, even for outdoor scenes. The result was a series that was both suffocatingly dull and embarrassingly low grade. Critics had their knives out immediately; ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster"[[note]] The co-producer was Time-Life Productions, who planned to air the series on Creator/{{PBS}} - to similarly dismal returns.[[/note]] that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too," while Nancy Banks-Smith in ''The Guardian'' described it as having "little to offer us but blood, horsehair, and history. Though a hell of a lot of each." Though it was originally scheduled for Mondays at 9:25pm, rapidly plummeting audience figures (down to a pathetic 1 million by Episode 9) forced the BBC to cut their losses by putting ''Series/{{Kojak}}'' in the time slot instead and burning off the rest of ''Churchill's People'' in a graveyard slot. It has never been repeated or released on DVD.
15th Jun '17 6:26:03 PM Scifimaster92
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* On paper, adapting UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill's four-volume ''A History of the English-Speaking Peoples'' into the 1974-75 miniseries '''''Churchill's People''''' seemed like a winning formula for a big dramatic prestige project. In practice, the books focus far more on political and military minutiae than on narrative,[[note]] Churchill's political rival UsefulNotes/ClementAttlee quipped that the books should have been called ''Things in History That Interested Me''.[[/note]] forcing the writers to invent their own characters and stories to bring key moments in the history of Britain and its former colonies to life, and the quality of the scripts varied hugely (with many characters speaking almost entirely in InfoDump monologues), as did the quality of the performances despite the veritable "who's who" of acting talent across the series.[[note]] Just to give a sample: Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/PatrickTroughton, Dennis Waterman, Anna Massey, Leo [=McKern=], Edward Fox, Gemma Jones, Gareth Thomas, Paul Darrow, Rita Webb, Patrick Stewart, Ian Hendry, Polly James, and Peter Bowles all appeared in different episodes.[[/note]] But by far the worst problem was the tiny budget (slashed as a result of the energy crisis to just £1.25 million for 26 episodes), which forced the episodes to be shot entirely on cheap studio sets, even for outdoor scenes. The result was a series that was both suffocatingly dull and embarrassingly low grade. Critics had their knives out immediately; ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster"[[note]] The co-producer was Time-Life Productions, who planned to air the series on Creator/{{PBS}} - to similarly dismal returns.[[/note]] that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too," while Nancy Banks-Smith in ''The Guardian'' described it as having "little to offer us but blood, horsehair, and history. Though a hell of a lot of each." Though it was originally scheduled for Mondays at 9:25pm, rapidly plummeting audience figures (down to a pathetic 1 million by Episode 9) forced the BBC to cut their losses by putting ''Series/{{Kojak}}'' in the time slot instead and burning off the rest of ''Churchill's People'' in a graveyard slot. It has never been repeated or released on DVD.

to:

* On paper, adapting UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill's four-volume ''A History of the English-Speaking Peoples'' into the 1974-75 miniseries '''''Churchill's People''''' seemed like a winning formula for a big dramatic prestige project. In practice, the books focus far more on political and military minutiae than on narrative,[[note]] Churchill's political rival UsefulNotes/ClementAttlee quipped that the books should have been called ''Things in History That Interested Me''.[[/note]] forcing the writers to invent their own characters and stories to bring key moments in the history of Britain and its former colonies to life, and the quality of the scripts varied hugely (with many characters speaking almost entirely in InfoDump monologues), as did the quality of the performances despite the veritable "who's who" of acting talent across the series.[[note]] Just to give a sample: Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/PatrickTroughton, Dennis Waterman, Anna Massey, Leo [=McKern=], Edward Fox, Gemma Jones, [[Series/BlakesSeven Gareth Thomas, Paul Darrow, Darrow,]] Rita Webb, Patrick Stewart, Creator/PatrickStewart, Ian Hendry, Polly James, and Peter Bowles all appeared in different episodes.[[/note]] But by far the worst problem was the tiny budget (slashed as a result of the energy crisis to just £1.25 million for 26 episodes), which forced the episodes to be shot entirely on cheap studio sets, even for outdoor scenes. The result was a series that was both suffocatingly dull and embarrassingly low grade. Critics had their knives out immediately; ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster"[[note]] The co-producer was Time-Life Productions, who planned to air the series on Creator/{{PBS}} - to similarly dismal returns.[[/note]] that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too," while Nancy Banks-Smith in ''The Guardian'' described it as having "little to offer us but blood, horsehair, and history. Though a hell of a lot of each." Though it was originally scheduled for Mondays at 9:25pm, rapidly plummeting audience figures (down to a pathetic 1 million by Episode 9) forced the BBC to cut their losses by putting ''Series/{{Kojak}}'' in the time slot instead and burning off the rest of ''Churchill's People'' in a graveyard slot. It has never been repeated or released on DVD.
19th May '17 10:37:46 PM nombretomado
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* '''''Ben Elton Live from Planet Earth''''', a live Australian stand-up[=/=]sketch-comedy[=/=]variety show starring comedian Creator/BenElton. It was intended as something of a comeback for Elton, who'd been absent from the comedy scene for a while and widely considered a DarthWiki/FallenCreator. It was also intended as a flagship for the Nine Network. Unfortunately, the material was dated, ineptly presented, and largely unfunny; it impressed almost no one. During the premiere, viewing figures dropped from 805,000 at the start (it was scheduled to start after ''Series/TopGear'' in primetime) to 233,000 by the end, with about 200,000 people dropping out every 15 minutes... and if the reaction on {{Twitter}} and other social networking sites was anything to go by, most of those who hung around watched solely to rip it to shreds. Critics were by and large no more generous; typical reviews took the lines "an early contender for worst show of the year" or "a screaming, embarrassing failure". It lasted three weeks, shedding even more viewers, before being cancelled. Quite possibly the worst section of the whole thing was ''Girl Flat'', a sitcom in which Music/LadyGaga, Music/{{Beyonce}} Knowles, Music/LilyAllen and Music/AmyWinehouse share a flat. It comes off like every line was ripped from crappy Website/YouTube comments--apparently, the writers thought that a famous woman saying "vagina" was the funniest thing to grace our green planet.

to:

* '''''Ben Elton Live from Planet Earth''''', a live Australian stand-up[=/=]sketch-comedy[=/=]variety show starring comedian Creator/BenElton. It was intended as something of a comeback for Elton, who'd been absent from the comedy scene for a while and widely considered a DarthWiki/FallenCreator. It was also intended as a flagship for the Nine Network. Unfortunately, the material was dated, ineptly presented, and largely unfunny; it impressed almost no one. During the premiere, viewing figures dropped from 805,000 at the start (it was scheduled to start after ''Series/TopGear'' in primetime) to 233,000 by the end, with about 200,000 people dropping out every 15 minutes... and if the reaction on {{Twitter}} Website/{{Twitter}} and other social networking sites was anything to go by, most of those who hung around watched solely to rip it to shreds. Critics were by and large no more generous; typical reviews took the lines "an early contender for worst show of the year" or "a screaming, embarrassing failure". It lasted three weeks, shedding even more viewers, before being cancelled. Quite possibly the worst section of the whole thing was ''Girl Flat'', a sitcom in which Music/LadyGaga, Music/{{Beyonce}} Knowles, Music/LilyAllen and Music/AmyWinehouse share a flat. It comes off like every line was ripped from crappy Website/YouTube comments--apparently, the writers thought that a famous woman saying "vagina" was the funniest thing to grace our green planet.
16th May '17 11:41:20 PM mlsmithca
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* David Croft was the co-writer of some of the most successful sitcoms of the 1970s, including ''Series/DadsArmy'' and ''Series/ItAintHalfHotMum'' with Jimmy Perry, and ''Series/AreYouBeingServed'' with Jeremy Lloyd. How he and Lloyd managed to create the stiflingly unfunny 1978 sci-fi sitcom '''''Come Back Mrs. Noah''''' remains a mystery. The series starred ''Series/AreYouBeingServed''[='=]s Mollie Sugden as 21st century housewife Gertrude Noah, who is touring a space station after winning a magazine competition, only for the station to be launched into orbit due to a series of technical faults, with only Noah, roving reporter Clive Cunliffe (''Series/DadsArmy''[='=]s Ian Lavender), mathematicians Carstairs and Fanshaw (''Series/ItAintHalfHotMum''[='=]s Donald Hewlett and Michael Knowles), and janitor Garstang (Joe Black) aboard to keep the station running until a rescue operation can be mounted; spoof news reports delivered by a pre-''Series/AlloAllo'' Gorden Kaye opened each episode. The jokes, such as they were, were mostly recycled from other series co-written by Croft, with many scenes revolving around "mechanical device malfunctions and/or makes rude noises" gags (as seen regularly on ''[=AYBS?=]''), and the outrageously strange and cheaply made props and sets did little to divert attention from the thin scripts. Critics tore it to shreds, and it was axed after a single series of six episodes. ''Come Back Mrs. Noah'' holds the dishonour of being the only BBC sitcom named to the "20 worst British sitcoms" list in Mark Lewisohn's 2003 edition of ''The ''Radio Times'' Guide to TV Comedy'', landing at #13,[[note]] ''All 19'' of the others were produced by ITV; see the corresponding section for some examples.[[/note]] and was also one of two Mollie Sugden vehicles to be thus slated (along with the 1987-88 Yorkshire Television series ''My Husband and I'', which Lewisohn ranked #16). It remains a fixture of assorted newspaper, magazine, and website "worst sitcom" lists.

to:

* David Croft was the co-writer of some of the most successful sitcoms of the 1970s, including ''Series/DadsArmy'' and ''Series/ItAintHalfHotMum'' with Jimmy Perry, and ''Series/AreYouBeingServed'' with Jeremy Lloyd. How he and Lloyd managed to create the stiflingly unfunny 1978 sci-fi sitcom '''''Come Back Mrs. Noah''''' remains a mystery. The series starred ''Series/AreYouBeingServed''[='=]s Mollie Sugden as 21st century housewife Gertrude Noah, who is touring a space station after winning a magazine competition, only for the station to be launched into orbit due to a series of technical faults, with only Noah, roving reporter Clive Cunliffe (''Series/DadsArmy''[='=]s Ian Lavender), mathematicians Carstairs and Fanshaw (''Series/ItAintHalfHotMum''[='=]s Donald Hewlett and Michael Knowles), and janitor light bulb changer Garstang (Joe Black) aboard to keep the station running until a rescue operation can be mounted; spoof news reports delivered by a pre-''Series/AlloAllo'' Gorden Kaye opened each episode. The jokes, such as they were, were mostly recycled from other series co-written by Croft, with many scenes revolving around "mechanical device malfunctions and/or makes rude noises" gags (as seen regularly on ''[=AYBS?=]''), and the outrageously strange and cheaply made props and sets did little to divert attention from the thin scripts. Critics tore it to shreds, and it was axed after a single series of six episodes. ''Come Back Mrs. Noah'' holds the dishonour of being the only BBC sitcom named to the "20 worst British sitcoms" list in Mark Lewisohn's 2003 edition of ''The ''Radio Times'' Guide to TV Comedy'', landing at #13,[[note]] ''All 19'' of the others were produced by ITV; see the corresponding section for some examples.[[/note]] and was also one of two Mollie Sugden vehicles to be thus slated (along with the 1987-88 Yorkshire Television series ''My Husband and I'', which Lewisohn ranked #16). It remains a fixture of assorted newspaper, magazine, and website "worst sitcom" lists.
12th May '17 10:31:05 AM mlsmithca
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* On paper, adapting UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill's four-volume ''A History of the English-Speaking Peoples'' into the 1974-75 miniseries '''''Churchill's People''''' seemed like a winning formula for a big dramatic prestige project. In practice, the books focus far more on political and military minutiae than on narrative,[[note]] Churchill's political rival UsefulNotes/ClementAttlee quipped that the books should have been called ''Things in History That Interested Me''.[[/note]] forcing the writers to invent their own characters and stories to bring key moments in the history of Britain and its former colonies to life, and the quality of the scripts varied hugely (with many characters speaking almost entirely in InfoDump monologues), as did the quality of the performances despite the veritable "who's who" of acting talent across the series.[[note]] Just to give a sample: Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/PatrickTroughton, Dennis Waterman, Anna Massey, Leo [=McKern=], Edward Fox, Gemma Jones, Gareth Thomas, Paul Darrow, Rita Webb, Patrick Stewart, Ian Hendry, Polly James, and Peter Bowles all appeared in different episodes.[[/note]] But by far the worst problem was the tiny budget (slashed as a result of the energy crisis to just £1.25 million for 26 episodes), which forced the episodes to be shot entirely on cheap studio sets, even for outdoor scenes. Critics had their knives out immediately; ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster"[[note]] The co-producer was Time-Life Productions, who planned to air the series on Creator/{{PBS}} - to similarly dismal returns.[[/note]] that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too," while Nancy Banks-Smith in ''The Guardian'' described it as having "little to offer us but blood, horsehair, and history. Though a hell of a lot of each." Though it was originally scheduled for Mondays at 9:25pm, rapidly plummeting audience figures (down to a pathetic 1 million by Episode 9) forced the BBC to cut their losses by putting ''Series/{{Kojak}}'' in the time slot instead and burning off the rest of ''Churchill's People'' in a graveyard slot. It has never been repeated or released on DVD.

to:

* On paper, adapting UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill's four-volume ''A History of the English-Speaking Peoples'' into the 1974-75 miniseries '''''Churchill's People''''' seemed like a winning formula for a big dramatic prestige project. In practice, the books focus far more on political and military minutiae than on narrative,[[note]] Churchill's political rival UsefulNotes/ClementAttlee quipped that the books should have been called ''Things in History That Interested Me''.[[/note]] forcing the writers to invent their own characters and stories to bring key moments in the history of Britain and its former colonies to life, and the quality of the scripts varied hugely (with many characters speaking almost entirely in InfoDump monologues), as did the quality of the performances despite the veritable "who's who" of acting talent across the series.[[note]] Just to give a sample: Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/PatrickTroughton, Dennis Waterman, Anna Massey, Leo [=McKern=], Edward Fox, Gemma Jones, Gareth Thomas, Paul Darrow, Rita Webb, Patrick Stewart, Ian Hendry, Polly James, and Peter Bowles all appeared in different episodes.[[/note]] But by far the worst problem was the tiny budget (slashed as a result of the energy crisis to just £1.25 million for 26 episodes), which forced the episodes to be shot entirely on cheap studio sets, even for outdoor scenes. The result was a series that was both suffocatingly dull and embarrassingly low grade. Critics had their knives out immediately; ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster"[[note]] The co-producer was Time-Life Productions, who planned to air the series on Creator/{{PBS}} - to similarly dismal returns.[[/note]] that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too," while Nancy Banks-Smith in ''The Guardian'' described it as having "little to offer us but blood, horsehair, and history. Though a hell of a lot of each." Though it was originally scheduled for Mondays at 9:25pm, rapidly plummeting audience figures (down to a pathetic 1 million by Episode 9) forced the BBC to cut their losses by putting ''Series/{{Kojak}}'' in the time slot instead and burning off the rest of ''Churchill's People'' in a graveyard slot. It has never been repeated or released on DVD.
12th May '17 10:29:14 AM mlsmithca
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* On paper, adapting UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill's four-volume ''A History of the English-Speaking Peoples'' into the 26-episode miniseries '''''Churchill's People''''' seemed like a winning formula for a big dramatic prestige project. In practice, the books focus far more on political and military minutiae than on narrative,[[note]] Churchill's political rival UsefulNotes/ClementAttlee quipped that the books should have been called ''Things in History That Interested Me''.[[/note]] forcing the writers to invent their own characters and stories to bring key moments in the history of Britain and its former colonies to life, and the quality of the scripts varied hugely (with many characters speaking almost entirely in InfoDump monologues), as did the quality of the performances despite the veritable "who's who" of acting talent across the series (just to give a sample: Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/PatrickTroughton, Dennis Waterman, Anna Massey, Leo [=McKern=], Edward Fox, Gemma Jones, Gareth Thomas, Paul Darrow, Rita Webb, Patrick Stewart, Ian Hendry, Polly James, and Peter Bowles). But by far the worst problem was the tiny budget (slashed as a result of the energy crisis to just £1.25 million for 26 episodes), which forced the episodes to be shot entirely on cheap studio sets, even for outdoor scenes. The result was a series that was suffocatingly dull and embarrassingly low grade. As if to add insult to injury, industrial action at the BBC led the series to miss the celebration of Churchill's 100th birthday, with the first episode airing on New Year's Eve 1974. Critics had their knives out immediately; ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster" that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too," while Nancy Banks-Smith in ''The Guardian'' described it as having "little to offer us but blood, horsehair, and history. Though a hell of a lot of each." Though it was originally scheduled for Mondays at 9:25pm, rapidly plummeting audience figures (down to a pathetic 1 million by Episode 9) forced the BBC to cut their losses by putting ''Series/{{Kojak}}'' in the time slot instead and burning off ''Churchill's People'' in a graveyard slot. It has never been repeated or released on DVD.

to:

* On paper, adapting UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill's four-volume ''A History of the English-Speaking Peoples'' into the 26-episode 1974-75 miniseries '''''Churchill's People''''' seemed like a winning formula for a big dramatic prestige project. In practice, the books focus far more on political and military minutiae than on narrative,[[note]] Churchill's political rival UsefulNotes/ClementAttlee quipped that the books should have been called ''Things in History That Interested Me''.[[/note]] forcing the writers to invent their own characters and stories to bring key moments in the history of Britain and its former colonies to life, and the quality of the scripts varied hugely (with many characters speaking almost entirely in InfoDump monologues), as did the quality of the performances despite the veritable "who's who" of acting talent across the series (just series.[[note]] Just to give a sample: Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/PatrickTroughton, Dennis Waterman, Anna Massey, Leo [=McKern=], Edward Fox, Gemma Jones, Gareth Thomas, Paul Darrow, Rita Webb, Patrick Stewart, Ian Hendry, Polly James, and Peter Bowles). Bowles all appeared in different episodes.[[/note]] But by far the worst problem was the tiny budget (slashed as a result of the energy crisis to just £1.25 million for 26 episodes), which forced the episodes to be shot entirely on cheap studio sets, even for outdoor scenes. The result was a series that was suffocatingly dull and embarrassingly low grade. As if to add insult to injury, industrial action at the BBC led the series to miss the celebration of Churchill's 100th birthday, with the first episode airing on New Year's Eve 1974. Critics had their knives out immediately; ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster" disaster"[[note]] The co-producer was Time-Life Productions, who planned to air the series on Creator/{{PBS}} - to similarly dismal returns.[[/note]] that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too," while Nancy Banks-Smith in ''The Guardian'' described it as having "little to offer us but blood, horsehair, and history. Though a hell of a lot of each." Though it was originally scheduled for Mondays at 9:25pm, rapidly plummeting audience figures (down to a pathetic 1 million by Episode 9) forced the BBC to cut their losses by putting ''Series/{{Kojak}}'' in the time slot instead and burning off the rest of ''Churchill's People'' in a graveyard slot. It has never been repeated or released on DVD.
12th May '17 1:12:00 AM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* On paper, adapting UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill's four-volume ''A History of the English-Speaking Peoples'' into the 26-episode 1974-75 miniseries '''''Churchill's People''''' seemed like a winning formula for a big dramatic prestige project. In practice, the books focus far more on political and military minutiae and less on narrative,[[note]] Churchill's political rival UsefulNotes/ClementAttlee quipped that the books should have been called ''Things in History That Interested Me''.[[/note]] forcing the writers to invent their own characters and stories to bring key moments in the history of Britain and its former colonies to life, and the quality of the scripts varied hugely (with many characters speaking almost entirely in InfoDump monologues), as did the quality of the performances despite the veritable "who's who" of acting talent across the series (just to give a sample: Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/PatrickTroughton, Dennis Waterman, Anna Massey, Leo [=McKern=], Edward Fox, Gemma Jones, Gareth Thomas, Paul Darrow, Rita Webb, Patrick Stewart, Ian Hendry, Polly James, and Peter Bowles). But by far the worst problem was the tiny budget (slashed as a result of the energy crisis), which forced the episodes to be shot entirely on cheap studio sets, even for outdoor scenes. The result was a series that was suffocatingly dull and embarrassingly low grade. ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster" that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too," while Nancy Banks-Smith in ''The Guardian'' described it as having "little to offer us but blood, horsehair, and history. Though a hell of a lot of each." Though it was originally scheduled for 9:25pm, rapidly plummeting audience figures (down to a pathetic 1 million by Episode 9) forced the BBC to burn off the remaining episodes in a graveyard slot to cut their losses. It has never been repeated or released on DVD.

to:

* On paper, adapting UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill's four-volume ''A History of the English-Speaking Peoples'' into the 26-episode 1974-75 miniseries '''''Churchill's People''''' seemed like a winning formula for a big dramatic prestige project. In practice, the books focus far more on political and military minutiae and less than on narrative,[[note]] Churchill's political rival UsefulNotes/ClementAttlee quipped that the books should have been called ''Things in History That Interested Me''.[[/note]] forcing the writers to invent their own characters and stories to bring key moments in the history of Britain and its former colonies to life, and the quality of the scripts varied hugely (with many characters speaking almost entirely in InfoDump monologues), as did the quality of the performances despite the veritable "who's who" of acting talent across the series (just to give a sample: Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/PatrickTroughton, Dennis Waterman, Anna Massey, Leo [=McKern=], Edward Fox, Gemma Jones, Gareth Thomas, Paul Darrow, Rita Webb, Patrick Stewart, Ian Hendry, Polly James, and Peter Bowles). But by far the worst problem was the tiny budget (slashed as a result of the energy crisis), crisis to just £1.25 million for 26 episodes), which forced the episodes to be shot entirely on cheap studio sets, even for outdoor scenes. The result was a series that was suffocatingly dull and embarrassingly low grade. As if to add insult to injury, industrial action at the BBC led the series to miss the celebration of Churchill's 100th birthday, with the first episode airing on New Year's Eve 1974. Critics had their knives out immediately; ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster" that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too," while Nancy Banks-Smith in ''The Guardian'' described it as having "little to offer us but blood, horsehair, and history. Though a hell of a lot of each." Though it was originally scheduled for Mondays at 9:25pm, rapidly plummeting audience figures (down to a pathetic 1 million by Episode 9) forced the BBC to burn cut their losses by putting ''Series/{{Kojak}}'' in the time slot instead and burning off the remaining episodes ''Churchill's People'' in a graveyard slot to cut their losses.slot. It has never been repeated or released on DVD.
11th May '17 4:13:07 PM mlsmithca
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* On paper, adapting UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill's four-volume ''A History of the English-Speaking Peoples'' into the 26-episode 1974-75 miniseries '''''Churchill's People''''' seemed like a winning formula for a big dramatic prestige project. In practice, the books focus far more on political and military minutiae and less on narrative,[[note]] Churchill's political rival UsefulNotes/ClementAttlee quipped that the books should have been called ''Things in History That Interested Me''.[[/note]] forcing the writers to invent their own characters and stories to bring key moments in the history of Britain and its former colonies to life, and the quality of the scripts varied hugely (with many characters speaking almost entirely in InfoDump monologues), as did the quality of the performances despite the veritable "who's who" of acting talent across the series (just to give a sample: Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/PatrickTroughton, Dennis Waterman, Anna Massey, Leo [=McKern=], Edward Fox, Gemma Jones, Paul Darrow, Patrick Stewart, and Polly James). But by far the worst problem was the tiny budget, which forced the episodes to be shot entirely on cheap studio sets, even for outdoor scenes. The result was a series that was suffocatingly dull and embarrassingly low grade. ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster" that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too," while Nancy Banks-Smith in ''The Guardian'' described it as having "little to offer us but blood, horsehair, and history. Though a hell of a lot of each." Though it was originally scheduled for 9:25pm, rapidly plummeting audience figures (down to a pathetic 1 million by Episode 9) forced the BBC to burn off the remaining episodes in a graveyard slot to cut their losses. It has never been repeated or released on DVD.

to:

* On paper, adapting UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill's four-volume ''A History of the English-Speaking Peoples'' into the 26-episode 1974-75 miniseries '''''Churchill's People''''' seemed like a winning formula for a big dramatic prestige project. In practice, the books focus far more on political and military minutiae and less on narrative,[[note]] Churchill's political rival UsefulNotes/ClementAttlee quipped that the books should have been called ''Things in History That Interested Me''.[[/note]] forcing the writers to invent their own characters and stories to bring key moments in the history of Britain and its former colonies to life, and the quality of the scripts varied hugely (with many characters speaking almost entirely in InfoDump monologues), as did the quality of the performances despite the veritable "who's who" of acting talent across the series (just to give a sample: Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/PatrickTroughton, Dennis Waterman, Anna Massey, Leo [=McKern=], Edward Fox, Gemma Jones, Gareth Thomas, Paul Darrow, Rita Webb, Patrick Stewart, and Ian Hendry, Polly James). James, and Peter Bowles). But by far the worst problem was the tiny budget, budget (slashed as a result of the energy crisis), which forced the episodes to be shot entirely on cheap studio sets, even for outdoor scenes. The result was a series that was suffocatingly dull and embarrassingly low grade. ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster" that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too," while Nancy Banks-Smith in ''The Guardian'' described it as having "little to offer us but blood, horsehair, and history. Though a hell of a lot of each." Though it was originally scheduled for 9:25pm, rapidly plummeting audience figures (down to a pathetic 1 million by Episode 9) forced the BBC to burn off the remaining episodes in a graveyard slot to cut their losses. It has never been repeated or released on DVD.
11th May '17 4:02:06 PM mlsmithca
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* On paper, adapting UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill's four-volume ''A History of the English-Speaking Peoples'' into the 26-episode 1974-75 miniseries '''''Churchill's People''''' seemed like a winning formula for a big dramatic prestige project. In practice, the books focus far more on political and military minutiae and less on narrative,[[note]] Churchill's political rival UsefulNotes/ClementAttlee quipped that the books should have been called ''Things in History That Interested Me''.[[/note]] forcing the writers to invent their own characters and stories to bring key moments in the history of Britain and its former colonies to life, and the quality of the scripts varied hugely (with many characters speaking almost entirely in InfoDump monologues), as did the quality of the performances despite the veritable "who's who" of acting talent across the series (just to give a sample: Creator/BrianBlessed, Creator/PatrickTroughton, Dennis Waterman, Anna Massey, Leo [=McKern=], Edward Fox, Gemma Jones, Paul Darrow, Patrick Stewart, and Polly James). But by far the worst problem was the tiny budget, which forced the episodes to be shot entirely on cheap studio sets, even for outdoor scenes. The result was a series that was suffocatingly dull and embarrassingly low grade. ''The Sunday Telegraph'' described it as "a co-production disaster" that "not only sounds like a school's radio programme, it looks like it too," while Nancy Banks-Smith in ''The Guardian'' described it as having "little to offer us but blood, horsehair, and history. Though a hell of a lot of each." Though it was originally scheduled for 9:25pm, rapidly plummeting audience figures (down to a pathetic 1 million by Episode 9) forced the BBC to burn off the remaining episodes in a graveyard slot to cut their losses. It has never been repeated or released on DVD.
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