History Headscratchers / TheTimeTravelersWife

25th Oct '16 6:51:12 PM hannahstohelit
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[[WMG: Once Kendrick has sequenced the genome, why don't they do IVF?]]
They know what the gene is, they have the technology, they have a geneticist on board... even if this is a dominant trait, as it seems to be, and they were just really unlucky that every one of the seven pregnancies exhibited the dominant trait, why not just do IVF and select a fetus exhibiting Clare's recessive and non-time-traveling trait, which would both allow the pregnancy to last AND ensure that Alba wouldn't be a time traveler? This is literally how they solve genetic issues these days, and I'm pretty sure they had the same abilities then.
14th Jul '16 3:29:34 PM margdean56
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** ...That would be why the disease is very * rare* , yes, and Henry is in fact the first known person to have it. Doesn't mean that it's impossible for the disease to "survive in the world", since whatever gene causes it clearly can be carried for some time without expressing itself (given that neither of Henry's parents were time travelers). The prenatal Henry was probably lucky. (Notice that the miscarriages may not be ''themselves'' directly because of the CDP; the fact that Clare's body rejects the fetuses could be due to any one of several problems that makes it difficult for many couples to conceive, the issue being that with Henry's offspring any minor problems in the womb trigger a fatal time traveling incident.)
** Henry's mutation was probably a de novo mutation - i.e. not inherited from either parent, but rather a spontaneous mutation that arose in Henry. Also, the mutation is eventually described as a type of trinucleotide repeat disorder (like Huntington's disease) and these types of genetic mutations tend to increase in severity as they are passed from generation to generation, which might explain why Henry's children, Alba excluded, start time traveling at a much younger age than Henry did.

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** ...That would be why the disease is very * rare* , ''rare'', yes, and Henry is in fact the first known person to have it. Doesn't mean that it's impossible for the disease to "survive in the world", since whatever gene causes it clearly can be carried for some time without expressing itself (given that neither of Henry's parents were time travelers). The prenatal Henry was probably lucky. (Notice that the miscarriages may not be ''themselves'' directly because of the CDP; the fact that Clare's body rejects the fetuses could be due to any one of several problems that makes it difficult for many couples to conceive, the issue being that with Henry's offspring any minor problems in the womb trigger a fatal time traveling incident.)
** Henry's mutation was probably a de novo mutation - -- i.e. not inherited from either parent, but rather a spontaneous mutation that arose in Henry. Also, the mutation is eventually described as a type of trinucleotide repeat disorder (like Huntington's disease) and these types of genetic mutations tend to increase in severity as they are passed from generation to generation, which might explain why Henry's children, Alba excluded, start time traveling at a much younger age than Henry did.



**** Uhm... Plenty of ways. Don't tell me you've never heard of a ''miscarriage'' until now? It happens to about a third of women at some point and this is the best explanation possible. Its ''not'' happening in (possibly) the majority of cases is something medical science is still working on an explanation for, but it seems to have something to do with the 'junk' DNA in a mammal actually containing the coding of a retrovirus- a natural immuno-suppressant- which explains why pregnant women are more vulnerable to some infections.

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**** Uhm... Plenty of ways. Don't tell me you've never heard of a ''miscarriage'' until now? It happens to about a third of women at some point and this is the best explanation possible. Its ''not'' happening in (possibly) the majority of cases is something medical science is still working on an explanation for, but it seems to have something to do with the 'junk' DNA in a mammal actually containing the coding of a retrovirus- a retrovirus--a natural immuno-suppressant- which immuno-suppressant--which explains why pregnant women are more vulnerable to some infections.



* Also, very few people other then Henry know about his condition. It's possible that any other time travelers also keep the knowledge of their condition to themselves and their close ones, and are also unaware of anyone else sharing this condition. Because of Henry, any other time travelers now know there are others - and will be more likely to reveal they are time travelers as well.

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* Also, very few people other then Henry know about his condition. It's possible that any other time travelers also keep the knowledge of their condition to themselves and their close ones, and are also unaware of anyone else sharing this condition. Because of Henry, any other time travelers now know there are others - -- and will be more likely to reveal they are time travelers as well.



** In all seriousness, the novel's premise is that a time-displaced person has '''no''' free will -- they're psychologically and physically unable to choose to do anything differently from how it was done before. If this dissatisfies you, sorry -- but do look up Novikov's self-consistency principle and try to grok it before tossing the book out the window. (The idea being that if our brains are just a physical process like any other and are ultimately deterministic like any other process -- which, as much as you might * dislike* the idea, we have no reason to believe isn't true -- then it's simple to prove that any non-causality-violating process, no matter how improbable it might seem, is less improbable than the sheer impossibility of violating causality. Go into the past with the intention of changing it and you * will* spontaneously change your mind because of a random neurochemical event in your brain.)

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** In all seriousness, the novel's premise is that a time-displaced person has '''no''' free will -- they're psychologically and physically unable to choose to do anything differently from how it was done before. If this dissatisfies you, sorry -- but do look up Novikov's self-consistency principle and try to grok it before tossing the book out the window. (The idea being that if our brains are just a physical process like any other and are ultimately deterministic like any other process -- which, as much as you might * dislike* ''dislike'' the idea, we have no reason to believe isn't true -- then it's simple to prove that any non-causality-violating process, no matter how improbable it might seem, is less improbable than the sheer impossibility of violating causality. Go into the past with the intention of changing it and you * will* ''will'' spontaneously change your mind because of a random neurochemical event in your brain.)



* I'm pretty sure WordOfGod stated that the novel takes place in an [[Main/YouCantFightFate Eternist Universe]] (everything that has ever happened --good things and bad things-- was ''supposed'' to happen that way). (Not that either of these is a less [[Main/NightmareFuel f___ed up world view]].)


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* I'm pretty sure WordOfGod stated that the novel takes place in an [[Main/YouCantFightFate Eternist Universe]] (everything that has ever happened --good happened--good things and bad things-- was things--was ''supposed'' to happen that way). (Not that either of these is a less [[Main/NightmareFuel f___ed up world view]].)




* I wondered about the mice. Kendrick said he tatooed them so he could recognise them. But seeing as fillings and, I'm guessing, piercings wouldn't go, why would ink?
** Because its burned into their skin, and is their flesh?
** He could have used some process that actually changed their skin, instead of just depositing ink (possibly making "tattoo" the wrong word, but it could be the closest thing for a layman to understand). Alternately, they may have repeatedly tattooed the mice without ink - it would still leave an identifiable mark (a wound, and possible minor scarring which would pretty much fade away over time), just not one that is as obvious or permanent.

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* I wondered about the mice. Kendrick said he tatooed tattooed them so he could recognise them. But seeing as fillings and, I'm guessing, piercings wouldn't go, why would ink?
** Because its it's burned into their skin, and is their flesh?
** He could have used some process that actually changed their skin, instead of just depositing ink (possibly making "tattoo" the wrong word, but it could be the closest thing for a layman to understand). Alternately, they may have repeatedly tattooed the mice without ink - -- it would still leave an identifiable mark (a wound, and possible minor scarring which would pretty much fade away over time), just not one that is as obvious or permanent.



* Because, you know, she has ''six'' miscarriages. I'm curious if the thought of "Gee, maybe we could just adopt." ever came up. Are they really that that obstinately selfish?

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* Because, you know, she has ''six'' miscarriages. I'm curious if the thought of "Gee, maybe we could just adopt." adopt" ever came up. Are they really that that obstinately selfish?



** In the book, Henry wants to adopt. Clare just whined and said "no, that'd be pretending. And I'm sick of pretending." At about this point this troper started disliking Clare because 1. She's being selfish as hell and 2. This troper IS adopted and it is NOT pretending.

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** In the book, Henry wants to adopt. Clare just whined and said "no, "No, that'd be pretending. And I'm sick of pretending." At about this point this troper started disliking Clare because 1. She's being selfish as hell and 2. This troper IS adopted and it is NOT pretending.



*** And hearin lies the state in which millions of people have children- their motives, much of the time, aren't pure. They know they're not ideally placed to be parents; they know they may not be giving their kid the world's finest genes. But they want to- need to, for their own emotional health, still feel that any alternative would be their own failure as a person- because procreation defies objective sense more often than not, and most people who think it's for the hypothetical child's benefit are either of a tiny, lucky minority, or deluding themselves. Doesn't mean they should be stopped.

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*** And hearin herein lies the state in which millions of people have children- their children--their motives, much of the time, aren't pure. They know they're not ideally placed to be parents; they know they may not be giving their kid the world's finest genes. But they want to- need to--need to, for their own emotional health, still feel that any alternative would be their own failure as a person- because person--because procreation defies objective sense more often than not, and most people who think it's for the hypothetical child's benefit are either of a tiny, lucky minority, or deluding themselves. Doesn't mean they should be stopped.



** ...What? He visited the moment several times throughout his life. Not a bunch of times all in one day. And even then it wasn't long enough for someone to ''freeze'' to death. Just because it didn't ''show'' us the moments didn't mean the ones shown in the book were the only times he travelled. Or else there'd be no way his bond with Claire would have eben that strong as she grew up.
* Another question: if he visited that time so many times, why aren't there 500 Henry's running around there?

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** ...What? He visited the moment several times throughout his life. Not a bunch of times all in one day. And even then it wasn't long enough for someone to ''freeze'' to death. Just because it didn't ''show'' us the moments didn't mean the ones shown in the book were the only times he travelled. Or else there'd be no way his bond with Claire Clare would have eben that strong as she grew up.
* Another question: if he visited that time so many times, why aren't there 500 Henry's Henrys running around there?



* And get to word out to himself, or have young Claire pass it along.

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* And get to word out to himself, or have young Claire Clare pass it along.



*** What would the doctor tell them? "Excuse me, but my patient has time-traveler's disease. So please excuse him if he steals anything in the future, or if he ends up stealing things yesterday." Until it was unmistakenly proven to be real to the public, there's nothing they could do to back them up.
**** That's the thing - the doctor ''had'' proven it was real. They had bred mice with the gene. He had seen Henry time travel. At the very least the police would know a string of minor unsolved thefts were justified. Maybe set it up so Future!Henry could go to any police department in the city for safety.
* Even without Henry or the Doc doing anything actively about that; Henry should by the present-day be some sort of "living legend" among the Chicago police force- or at least an Urban legend.
[[WMG: Claire was nasty to Henry for no reason!]]
* At one point, Claire berates Henry for saying she "had no choice" and that he "invaded her mind and heart from an early age" (paraphrasing, and it's from [[TheFilmOfTheBook the movie version.]]) But ... because it's a case of YouAlreadyChangedThePast, ''neither'' is responsible. Henry would not have thought anything of Clare had she not confronted him in the library when he was young and ''said'' he was going to know her.

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*** What would the doctor tell them? "Excuse me, but my patient has time-traveler's disease. So please excuse him if he steals anything in the future, or if he ends up stealing things yesterday." Until it was unmistakenly unmistakably proven to be real to the public, there's nothing they could do to back them up.
**** That's the thing - -- the doctor ''had'' proven it was real. They had bred mice with the gene. He had seen Henry time travel. At the very least the police would know a string of minor unsolved thefts were justified. Maybe set it up so Future!Henry could go to any police department in the city for safety.
* Even without Henry or the Doc doing anything actively about that; Henry should by the present-day be some sort of "living legend" among the Chicago police force- or force--or at least an Urban legend.
[[WMG: Claire Clare was nasty to Henry for no reason!]]
* At one point, Claire Clare berates Henry for saying she "had no choice" and that he "invaded her mind and heart from an early age" (paraphrasing, and it's from [[TheFilmOfTheBook the movie version.]]) But ... because it's a case of YouAlreadyChangedThePast, ''neither'' is responsible. Henry would not have thought anything of Clare had she not confronted him in the library when he was young and ''said'' he was going to know her.
23rd Jun '15 6:13:12 PM Hoernla
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* Even without Henry or the Doc doing anything actively about that; Henry should by the present-day be some sort of "living legend" among the Chicago police force- or at least an Urban legend.
19th Jan '15 7:39:14 PM LookielouE1705
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*** Actually, they're still trying to prove that self-consistent solutions always exist, which is a far cry from proving they are necessarily what happens. The principle (that they're not using a stronger word should be a red flag) is merely begging the question: if time travel paradox is impossible, then time travel paradox is impossible.
14th Jan '15 2:10:19 AM OzzieScribbler
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** The book mentions one teleported fetus to still have umbilical cord attached to it.
4th Aug '13 9:36:35 PM pittsburghmuggle
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**** That's the thing - the doctor ''had'' proven it was real. They had bred mice with the gene. He had seen Henry time travel. At the very least the police would know a string of minor unsolved thefts were justified.

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**** That's the thing - the doctor ''had'' proven it was real. They had bred mice with the gene. He had seen Henry time travel. At the very least the police would know a string of minor unsolved thefts were justified. Maybe set it up so Future!Henry could go to any police department in the city for safety.
4th Aug '13 9:35:59 PM pittsburghmuggle
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**** That's the thing - the doctor ''had'' proven it was real. They had bred mice with the gene. He had seen Henry time travel. At the very least the police would know a string of minor unsolved thefts were justified.
5th Mar '13 7:31:03 PM Oberoniss
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***time travel it's self is reason to think causality can be violated. Our reasoning for thinking we live in a universe where the past determine the future is based on things like time travel not being possible

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***time *** Time travel it's self itself is reason to think causality can be violated. Our reasoning for thinking we live in a universe where the past determine determines the future is based on things like time travel not being possible possible.
5th Mar '13 4:10:24 PM Hooooooop
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***time travel it's self is reason to think causality can be violated. Our reasoning for thinking we live in a universe where the past determine the future is based on things like time travel not being possible
6th Oct '12 4:49:35 PM LittleZelina
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** They'd have to do one hell of a lot of pretending to be ''allowed'' to adopt, actually. It's not like you just fill in a form and send off for a child...



*** And hearin lies the state in which millions of people have children- their motives, much of the time, aren't pure. They know they're not ideally placed to be parents; they know they may not be giving their kid the world's finest genes. But they want to- need to, for their own emotional health- because procreation defies objective sense more often than not, and most people who think it's for the hypothetical child's benefit are either of a tiny, lucky minority, or deluding themselves. Doesn't mean they should be stopped.

to:

*** And hearin lies the state in which millions of people have children- their motives, much of the time, aren't pure. They know they're not ideally placed to be parents; they know they may not be giving their kid the world's finest genes. But they want to- need to, for their own emotional health- health, still feel that any alternative would be their own failure as a person- because procreation defies objective sense more often than not, and most people who think it's for the hypothetical child's benefit are either of a tiny, lucky minority, or deluding themselves. Doesn't mean they should be stopped.
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