History Headscratchers / TheHeroesOfOlympus

19th Apr '17 3:49:21 PM MasterFuzzy
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** Presumably, it would depend on the gods themselves, and how they were seen by the Greeks and the Romans. Hermes, for example, probably wouldn't be very different from Mercury.






** Camp Half Blood does not have a prison. Even if Camp Jupiter does, which considering it has a city it probably has some sort of jail, monsters are super strong. They'd need to use Celestial Bronze or Imperial Gold bars to hold them, and Rome is lacking them
* Why are the Olmypians being affected at are. The Greeks are not in combat yet, and even if some are in the mood for it, why are so many being affected. Artemis doesn't have Roman hunters, Neither Zeus's or Hades's children aren't trying to murder each other and Posiedon has no Roman children on a warpath.

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** Camp Half Blood does not have a prison. Even if Camp Jupiter does, which considering it has a city it probably has some sort of jail, monsters are super strong. They'd need to use Celestial Bronze or Imperial Gold bars to hold them, and Rome is lacking them
them.
** Furthermore, how would you get the monsters to that prison? You'd need to guard them on the way back to wherever the prison is, which would be tough, especially for something like a Cyclops or a hellhound. Then there's the fact that if you're on a quest, you usually need to move fast and light, not worry about lugging prisoners around. And then there's the NightmareFuel of what would happen if a whole bunch of monsters were gathered in one place, then set free. Essentially, it'd be a huge undertaking, and probably not worthwhile.

* Why are the Olmypians being affected at are.all. The Greeks are not in combat yet, and even if some are in the mood for it, why are so many being affected. Artemis doesn't have Roman hunters, Neither Zeus's or Hades's children aren't trying to murder each other and Posiedon has no Roman children on a warpath.



** Gods while being independent immortal beings are also manifestations of human culture. The demigods act as a sort of physical link between the mortal and supernatural world, with Greek Demigods representing the Ancient Greece aspect of the Gods and Roman Demigods representing the Roman aspect. So when Greek and Roman Demigods start hating each other, then the Gods literally beating themselves up. This is the reason why Hera never suffered from any problems As for why Aphrodite and Nemesis remain stable their Greek and Roman perceptions of them are pretty much the same as they are aspects of human emotions(love and revenge), not culture so they are unaffected.

to:

** Gods while being independent immortal beings are also manifestations of human culture. The demigods act as a sort of physical link between the mortal and supernatural world, with Greek Demigods representing the Ancient Greece aspect of the Gods and Roman Demigods representing the Roman aspect. So when Greek and Roman Demigods start hating each other, then the Gods literally beating themselves up. This is the reason why Hera never suffered from any problems problems. As for why Aphrodite and Nemesis remain stable their Greek and Roman perceptions of them are pretty much the same as they are aspects of human emotions(love and revenge), not culture so they are unaffected.



** Also the shapeshifting and burning-stick curse are all inherited traits that were passed through by blood. It's the same reason why Percy Jackson still has water manipulation abilities even though he is a Greek Demigod. The Curse of Achilles, however, was something Percy gained by taking a dipped into a magical river.

to:

** Also the shapeshifting and burning-stick curse are all inherited traits that were passed through by blood. It's the same reason why Percy Jackson still has water manipulation abilities even though he is a Greek Demigod. The Curse of Achilles, however, was something Percy gained by taking a dipped dip into a magical river.
** My guess is that the reason it doesn't come back is because the Tiber doesn't just suppress it, it washes away the effects of the Styx completely. And it kinda makes sense, too: He got the gift from a Greek river, so he loses it to a Roman river.
13th Apr '17 7:30:02 AM blackberry919
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** The series portrays the gods have having some sort of shared metaphysical connection to the cultures they live in and they all share a connection to Olympus. Athena did not want to become Minerva, but she did anyway against her will. In a way they are almost like an interdependent collective. Athena changed because the collective changed. The two sides gearing up for war against each other is enough for the collective to be at odds with itself. Artemis and Jupiter are part of that collective. Worse, even if the fighting hasn't started yet both sides will call upon the Olympians for aid putting the Greek and Roman sides at odds.
** Gods while being independent immortal beings are also manifestations of human culture. The demigods act as a sort of physical link between the mortal and supernatural world, with Greek Demigods representing the Ancient Greece aspect of the Gods and Roman Demigods representing the Roman aspect. So when Greek and Roman Demigods start hating each other, then the Gods literally beating themselves up. This is the reason why Hera never suffered from any problems As for why Aphrodite and Nemesis remain stable their Greek and Roman perceptions of them are pretty much the same as they are aspects of human emotions(love and revenge) not culture so they are unaffected.

to:

** The series portrays the gods have having some sort of shared metaphysical connection to the cultures they live in and they all share a connection to Olympus. Athena did not want to become Minerva, but she did anyway against her will. In a way way, they are almost like an interdependent collective. Athena changed because the collective changed. The two sides gearing up for war against each other is enough for the collective to be at odds with itself. Artemis and Jupiter are part of that collective. Worse, even if the fighting hasn't started yet both sides will call upon the Olympians for aid putting the Greek and Roman sides at odds.
** Gods while being independent immortal beings are also manifestations of human culture. The demigods act as a sort of physical link between the mortal and supernatural world, with Greek Demigods representing the Ancient Greece aspect of the Gods and Roman Demigods representing the Roman aspect. So when Greek and Roman Demigods start hating each other, then the Gods literally beating themselves up. This is the reason why Hera never suffered from any problems As for why Aphrodite and Nemesis remain stable their Greek and Roman perceptions of them are pretty much the same as they are aspects of human emotions(love and revenge) revenge), not culture so they are unaffected.



** Its due to the Roman/Greek split that the Olympian gods are pretty much incapacitated, with the exception of a few(Nemesis and Aphrodite being them). Frank was able to do something so badass that he was able to temporary called upon his father but eventually become unstable and exploded.

* The giants are supposed to be the counters to the Olympians which would imply a virtually unlimited amount of magical power that can be used in numerous ways aside from their strength, immortality, and unique powers. We have seen minor gods on several occasions turn children of the Big 3 into planes with a wave of their hand. Why don't the giants do this? Why do they waste effort on physical combat when they are outmatched in that regard? The only powers I recall seeing is Otis and Ephialtes teleporting. Some like Polybotes might be vaguely excused due to their arrogance and fighting only one demigod at the time. But what about Enceladus? He is supposed to be the tactician? Why didn't he turn the demigods to stone once he saw the battle start to turn against him? If there was another god present to block or cancel this out it would be explained, but against Enceladus there was not another god blocking his powers. If the giants lack the powerful magics that make the Olympians so dangerous how then are the giants supposed to a threat? What keeps Zeus from pelting them with thunderbolts from a safe distance? What keeps Poseidon from doing the same to Polybotes? Are the giants just a disappointment as adversaries? Formidable against mortals yes, but so far a far cry from the greatest threat ever.

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** Its It's due to the Roman/Greek split that the Olympian gods are pretty much incapacitated, with the exception of a few(Nemesis and Aphrodite being them). Frank was able to do something so badass that he was able to temporary called upon his father but eventually become unstable and exploded.

* The giants are supposed to be the counters to the Olympians which would imply a virtually unlimited amount of magical power that can be used in numerous ways aside from their strength, immortality, and unique powers. We have seen minor gods on several occasions turn children of the Big 3 into planes with a wave of their hand. Why don't the giants do this? Why do they waste effort on physical combat when they are outmatched in that regard? The only powers I recall seeing is Otis and Ephialtes teleporting. Some like Polybotes might be vaguely excused due to their arrogance and fighting only one demigod at the time. But what about Enceladus? He is supposed to be the tactician? Why didn't he turn the demigods to stone once he saw the battle start to turn against him? If there was another god present to block or cancel this out it would be explained, but against Enceladus Enceladus, there was not another god blocking his powers. If the giants lack the powerful magics that make the Olympians so dangerous how then are the giants supposed to a threat? What keeps Zeus from pelting them with thunderbolts from a safe distance? What keeps Poseidon from doing the same to Polybotes? Are the giants just a disappointment as adversaries? Formidable against mortals yes, but so far a far cry from the greatest threat ever.



*** I guess that makes sens to some degree. I can see Dionysus failing to turn them into dolphins. It would make sense that they have some immunity to things like that. On the other, we have seen that when killed it can take them a few minutes to regenerate. This can be slowed down by using water or wind to scatter the sand that tries to reform them. So I guess in theory Zeus, Poseidon, Apollo, Artemis and other gods could pelt them safely from a distance and while the giants reform send in demigods to kill them. Their magic is what makes the gods so dangerous and beyond the possibility for mortals to defeat if they are using it. I can't see the giants really being a direct threat do the gods because of it. I guess that is why it seems Riodan may have to water the gods down some or come up with something different. The Titans were alternate gods who could transform and match the magic of the gods with their own. The giants...not so much.
*** Don't see what you mean by having "a few minutes to regenerate" any wound the demigods make heal instantly, and even then the time the demigods attack the giants they were much weaker. Besides being created as "anti-god" they probably are invulnerable to ''any'' attacks from gods. Notice whenever a giant is hurt it's usually the mortal demigod who does the fight while all the god never do anything is provide the finishing blow (or in Bacchus case ''tap them on the head with a pine cone''). It's possible that the "Can only be killed by gods and man working together" shtick they have requires the demigod to weaken them first before the gods provide the final death blow. Which would explain why Bacchus and Hecate let the demigods do most of the work.
*** No, it often took the giants a few minutes or more to regenerate from wounds. It was not instant. That is why when Percy and Jason defeated the giant twins Baccus could walk over and finish them off. Orion also had not healed from his wounds by the time of his final confrontation with Reyna. So at first they did not heal fast. And there is nothing to indicate they are invulnerable to attacks from the gods. Baccus is a lazy jerkass and Hecate is not a warrior. Clytius was the only giant whose power to counter their respective god, Hecate in this case, actually makes sense. There is no reason to think a god could not weaken a giant and then rely on a demigod to finish them off. Heck, at the end Zeus's master bolt nearly killed Porphyrion and he did not instantly heal so that blows all of this out of the water.

* Ok, so this question isn't that important or relevant, but this troper was just curious. So throughout the series, most of the main characters are described as being attractive (albeit some in their own way), especially by their significant other. In fact, the only even "semi major" ones that are said to be unattractive are Octavian and poor Nico, the latter of which is implied as seemingly a result of homophobia since only straight guys point out how "creepy" he is. Anyways, the only major character whom is not confirmed as either attractive or not is Reyna...so is she supposed to be attractive? All anyone seems to imply about her is that she's scary. Only Piper calls her beautiful, though this may be a case of the former feeling sorry for herself and being insecure, as she has been shown to do; Jason correcting her seemed to possibly imply this. I understand that interestingly through the different point of views the attractiveness of characters vary, depending on their 'type' and whatnot (for example, Percy doesn't mention if Thalia is attractive or not, as they seem to have a cousinly relationship, whereas Leo thought she was hot). But still, as someone who likes to know how to imagine characters, I wasn't really sure what to think.
** Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. It's not so much homophobia as that we only see through their eyes. If none of our narrators think Nico and Octavian are hot, then the reader might assume they're ugly. On Nico's "creepy"-ness, the girls seem to be more forgiving, and they might genuinely think Nico is a little attractive, but is being overpowered by being creepy. This troper doesn't find Jason attractive because he's described as having the stereotypical roman face, despite Piper's long, detailed moments of just describing how much she loves him. Fear can ovveride any sight of beauty. Reyna might be beautiful but the guys are so afraid of her they can't notice it. Or maybe she is ugly. Who knows. Most fanart makes everyone beautiful, and official artwork is so off it hurts.
** I second that it's a case of beauty is in the eye of the beholder. We're used to thinking Annabeth is very attractive because she's mostly seen from Percy's POV who thinks she's a knock out [[spoiler: even when they're in Taratarus.]] While she obviously has some conventionally attractive features (blonde hair, athletic build) Jason and Leo's main reaction is "wow scary gray eyes" and "Omg, this girl is ''freaking terrifying'' and going to kill us" That might be a similar case for Reyna - people are focused on how intimidating she is, not how she looks.

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*** I guess that makes sens sense to some degree. I can see Dionysus failing to turn them into dolphins. It would make sense that they have some immunity to things like that. On the other, we have seen that when killed it can take them a few minutes to regenerate. This can be slowed down by using water or wind to scatter the sand that tries to reform them. So I guess in theory Zeus, Poseidon, Apollo, Artemis and other gods could pelt them safely from a distance and while the giants reform and send in demigods to kill them. Their magic is what makes the gods so dangerous and beyond the possibility for mortals to defeat if they are using it. I can't see the giants really being a direct threat do the gods because of it. I guess that is why it seems Riodan Riordan may have to water the gods down some or come up with something different. The Titans were alternate gods who could transform and match the magic of the gods with their own. The giants...not so much.
*** Don't see what you mean by having "a few minutes to regenerate" any wound the demigods make heal instantly, and even then the time the demigods attack the giants they were much weaker. Besides being created as "anti-god" they probably are invulnerable to ''any'' attacks from gods. Notice Notice, whenever a giant is hurt it's usually the mortal demigod who does the fight while all the god never do anything anything, is provide the finishing blow (or in Bacchus case ''tap them on the head with a pine cone''). It's possible that the "Can only be killed by gods and man working together" shtick they have requires the demigod to weaken them first before the gods provide the final death blow. Which would explain why Bacchus and Hecate let the demigods do most of the work.
*** No, it often took the giants a few minutes or more to regenerate from wounds. It was not instant. That is why when Percy and Jason defeated the giant twins Baccus could walk over and finish them off. Orion also had not healed from his wounds by the time of his final confrontation with Reyna. So at first first, they did not heal fast. And there is nothing to indicate they are invulnerable to attacks from the gods. Baccus is a lazy jerkass and Hecate is not a warrior. Clytius was the only giant whose power to counter their respective god, Hecate in this case, actually actually, makes sense. There is no reason to think a god could not weaken a giant and then rely on a demigod to finish them off. Heck, at the end Zeus's master bolt nearly killed Porphyrion and he did not instantly heal so that blows all of this out of the water.

* Ok, so this question isn't that important or relevant, but this troper was just curious. So throughout the series, most of the main characters are described as being attractive (albeit some in their own way), especially by their significant other. In fact, the only even "semi major" "semi-major" ones that are said to be unattractive are Octavian and poor Nico, the latter of which is implied as seemingly a result of homophobia since only straight guys point out how "creepy" he is. Anyways, the only major character whom who is not confirmed as either attractive or not is Reyna...so is she supposed to be attractive? All anyone seems to imply about her is that she's scary. Only Piper calls her beautiful, though this may be a case of the former feeling sorry for herself and being insecure, as she has been shown to do; Jason correcting her seemed to possibly imply this. I understand that interestingly through the different point of views the attractiveness of characters vary, depending on their 'type' and whatnot (for example, Percy doesn't mention if Thalia is attractive or not, as they seem to have a cousinly relationship, whereas Leo thought she was hot). But still, as someone who likes to know how to imagine characters, I wasn't really sure what to think.
** Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. It's not so much homophobia as that we only see through their eyes. If none of our narrators think Nico and Octavian are hot, then the reader might assume they're ugly. On Nico's "creepy"-ness, the girls seem to be more forgiving, and they might genuinely think Nico is a little attractive, attractive but is being overpowered by being creepy. This troper doesn't find Jason attractive because he's described as having the stereotypical roman face, despite Piper's long, detailed moments of just describing how much she loves him. Fear can ovveride override any sight of beauty. Reyna might be beautiful but the guys are so afraid of her they can't notice it. Or maybe she is ugly. Who knows. Most fanart makes everyone beautiful, and the official artwork is so off it hurts.
** I second that it's a case of beauty is in the eye of the beholder. We're used to thinking Annabeth is very attractive because she's mostly seen from Percy's POV who thinks she's a knock out knockout [[spoiler: even when they're in Taratarus.Tartarus.]] While she obviously has some conventionally attractive features (blonde hair, athletic build) Jason and Leo's main reaction is "wow scary gray eyes" and "Omg, this girl is ''freaking terrifying'' and going to kill us" That might be a similar case for Reyna - people are focused on how intimidating she is, not how she looks.



* Why was Athena/Minerva appearing to Annabeth in her Roman form? It's clear that Athena hates the Romans for stripping her status as the Goddess of Warfare and Strategy, and by hiding her statue from the Greeks, so why is she seriously affected by the war? In fact, Athena should have been less affected than Ares/Mars, who became an important diety to the Romans. Unless there are Romans taking pottery or weaving classes in New Rome, praying to Minerva for an A+ on their piece of artwork, I highly doubt that Athena should be on the worse end of the Greek/Roman Godly shift.
** The divide wasn't based on whether or not the gods could choose a side or how much worship they got (at least not entirely), it was about how different the two sides of them were with a dash of what their personalities were like. Athena's problem was that not only were her Greek and Roman aspects totally different from each other, but she was basically the closest you could get to a living representation of the Greek/Roman feud because of the whole deal with the Parthenos. Ares and Mars, meanwhile, were both war gods, but Mars was disciplined and tactical while Ares was bloodthirsty and wild. Combined with them being, you know, war gods, of course they had issues reconciling themselves. This is also why Aphrodite/Venus got off mostly scot-free; she represents pretty much the exact same universal concepts in both cultures and has the same personality too, so she's almost totally unaffected.

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* Why was Athena/Minerva appearing to Annabeth in her Roman form? It's clear that Athena hates the Romans for stripping her status as the Goddess of Warfare and Strategy, and by hiding her statue from the Greeks, so why is she seriously affected by the war? In fact, Athena should have been less affected than Ares/Mars, who became an important diety deity to the Romans. Unless there are Romans taking pottery or weaving classes in New Rome, praying to Minerva for an A+ on their piece of artwork, I highly doubt that Athena should be on the worse end of the Greek/Roman Godly shift.
** The divide wasn't based on whether or not the gods could choose a side or how much worship they got (at least not entirely), it was about how different the two sides of them were with a dash of what their personalities were like. Athena's problem was that not only were her Greek and Roman aspects totally different from each other, but she was basically the closest you could get to a living representation of the Greek/Roman feud because of the whole deal with the Parthenos. Ares and Mars, meanwhile, were both war gods, but Mars was disciplined and tactical while Ares was bloodthirsty and wild. Combined with them being, you know, war gods, of course course, they had issues reconciling themselves. This is also why Aphrodite/Venus got off mostly scot-free; she represents pretty much the exact same universal concepts in both cultures and has the same personality too, so she's almost totally unaffected.



** We have to remember that bits of the floor, walls, ceiling, the statue itself, a lot of things in that layer were covered/supported by spider-silk - no doubt all the lines stuck together in some fashion, or perhaps Arachne tried to catch it with more of her own, until she ran out and suddenly boom, instant weight on the line. Also, there was the explicit 'Nemesis trade' angle going on, which was implied to have pulled them down - maybe Arachne had a small part involved with this, or maybe she didn't; it's unclear exactly what happened underneath the weakened floor, since our focus was on the demigods.

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** We have to remember that bits of the floor, walls, ceiling, the statue itself, a lot of things in that layer were covered/supported by spider-silk - no doubt all the lines stuck together in some fashion, or perhaps Arachne tried to catch it with more of her own, until she ran out and suddenly boom, instant weight on the line. Also, there was the explicit 'Nemesis trade' angle going on, which was implied to have pulled them down - maybe Arachne had a small part involved with this, or maybe she didn't; it's unclear exactly what happened underneath the weakened floor, floor since our focus was on the demigods.



** Zeus and the other Olympians reluctantly gave gifts because it was what was expected. Zeus at least was not happy with having to acknowledge he was saved by mortals or his brothers. The Second Giant War was another embarrassment where Zeus once again was saved by mortals, but had to be saved by his wife as well, disobeyed by everyone, and all in all made a fool of which his colossal pride cannot stand. He never got a chance to prove how great Zeus is. So he was no in mood to reward anything. Instead, he was trying to spin things so he looks good.
** I haven't read most of the books in this series, so I might be stepping into uncharted territory with this, but...it's also possible that Kronos was simply a bigger threat to the gods than the giants, or at least a less familiar one. In mythology, the gods had already faced the giants once before, and that was the source of the procedure where they would need a mortal's help to help them do it. So the demigods helping them in this instance is probably considered less "Going above and beyond" than simply doing what they would be expected to do under those circumstances. Poseidon even starts to compare Percy to Hercules (the mortal who helped the gods during the first Gigantomachy) at the end of ''The Last Olympian'', implying that not even he would've been expected to defend Olympus from the Titans and defeat Kronos in the absence of the gods.
*** The Giants were initially played up to be the bigger threat since they were specifically designed to counter the Olympians and required a demigod to help kill them. In practice, the Titans were the large threat and Typhon large than either. The gods had already face the Titans before as well when the Titans were stronger and the gods the weaker party. The Titans only became a threat because Zeus refused to do anything about them until it was too late. Either way, performing heroic services beyond fighting standard monsters and getting some sort of compensation is kind of expected just like civilians or military personal who perform above and beyond what is expected are recognized.

* It's explicitly stated that Greek blessings can't survive crossing the Little Tiber, because you officially enter Roman territory there. That's why Percy loses Achilles' invulnerability (thinking about it, why didn't it come back after he left Rome? Or finished his quest from Rome, or whatever?). So exactly why does Frank get to keep Periclymenus' blessing? It's Greek, right? And what about the whole burning-stick curse? It's based on Meleager, a ''Greek'' hero. Shouldn't he lose those traits while he's in Rome?

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** Zeus and the other Olympians reluctantly gave gifts because it was what was expected. Zeus at least was not happy with having to acknowledge he was saved by mortals or his brothers. The Second Giant War was another embarrassment where Zeus once again was saved by mortals, mortals but had to be saved by his wife as well, disobeyed by everyone, and all in all made a fool of which his colossal pride cannot stand. He never got a chance to prove how great Zeus is. So he was in no in mood to reward anything. Instead, he was trying to spin things so he looks good.
** I haven't read most of the books in this series, so I might be stepping into uncharted territory with this, but...it's also possible that Kronos was simply a bigger threat to the gods than the giants, giants or at least a less familiar one. In mythology, the gods had already faced the giants once before, and that was the source of the procedure where they would need a mortal's help to help them do it. So the demigods helping them in this instance is probably considered less "Going above and beyond" than simply doing what they would be expected to do under those circumstances. Poseidon even starts to compare Percy to Hercules (the mortal who helped the gods during the first Gigantomachy) at the end of ''The Last Olympian'', implying that not even he would've been expected to defend Olympus from the Titans and defeat Kronos in the absence of the gods.
*** The Giants were initially played up to be the bigger threat since they were specifically designed to counter the Olympians and required a demigod to help kill them. In practice, the Titans were the large threat and Typhon large than either. The gods had already face the Titans before as well when the Titans were stronger and the gods the weaker party. The Titans only became a threat because Zeus refused to do anything about them until it was too late. Either way, performing heroic services beyond fighting standard monsters and getting some sort of compensation is kind of expected just like civilians or military personal personnel who perform above and beyond what is expected are recognized.

* It's explicitly stated that Greek blessings can't survive crossing the Little Tiber, Tiber because you officially enter Roman territory there. That's why Percy loses Achilles' invulnerability (thinking about it, why didn't it come back after he left Rome? Or finished his quest from Rome, or whatever?). So exactly why does Frank get to keep Periclymenus' blessing? It's Greek, right? And what about the whole burning-stick curse? It's based on Meleager, a ''Greek'' hero. Shouldn't he lose those traits while he's in Rome?



** Also the shapeshifting and burning-stick curse are all inherited traits that were past through by blood. It's the same reason why Percy Jackson still has water manipulation abilities even though he is a Greek Demigod. The Curse of Achilles however was something Percy gained by taking a dipped into a magical river.

* It's been shown time after time that mythologically significant locations get transplanted to whatever location is currently the center of Western Civilization. That's why all the giants are under American mountains, Olympus is in New York, etc. The Pillars of Hercules, though, remain where they have always been, in Spain... Why? This is acknowledged in universe, but no explanation is ever offered.
** Because the Pillars of Hercules are specifically created to guard Civilization from dangerous monsters. The ancient greeks believed that the Atantic Ocean was the wild untamed ocean filled with the most dangerous monsters and the Pillars of Hercules keep them safe. Only now the situation has inverted and the Mediterranean has become the place filled with dangerous monsters and the Western Civilization is across the Atlantic. So the Pillars have no need to move.

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** Also the shapeshifting and burning-stick curse are all inherited traits that were past passed through by blood. It's the same reason why Percy Jackson still has water manipulation abilities even though he is a Greek Demigod. The Curse of Achilles however Achilles, however, was something Percy gained by taking a dipped into a magical river.

* It's been shown time after time that mythologically significant locations get transplanted to whatever location is currently the center of Western Civilization. That's why all the giants are under American mountains, Olympus is in New York, etc. The Pillars of Hercules, though, remain where they have always been, in Spain... Why? This is acknowledged in universe, in-universe, but no explanation is ever offered.
** Because the Pillars of Hercules are specifically created to guard Civilization from against dangerous monsters. The ancient greeks believed that the Atantic Atlantic Ocean was the wild untamed ocean filled with the most dangerous monsters and the Pillars of Hercules keep them safe. Only now the situation has inverted and the Mediterranean has become the place filled with dangerous monsters and the Western Civilization is across the Atlantic. So the Pillars have no need to move.



* When Jason, Leo, and Piper are confronted by Lycaon in ''The Lost Hero'', wasn't it said that Leo checked his tool belt for weapons made of silver, and came up with nothing? Then at the Wolf House, he helps fight off the wolves using hammers with silver heads. Why didn't he use those earlier?

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* When Jason, Leo, and Piper are confronted by Lycaon in ''The Lost Hero'', wasn't it said that Leo checked his tool belt for weapons made of silver, and came up with nothing? Then at the Wolf House, he helps fight off the wolves using hammers with silver heads. Why didn't he use those earlier?earlier?
**I think it's because the toolbelt can only make "tools". Hammers are technically tools, weapons are not. It might also be that he has to know what he wants (at least in his head)to summon something.
20th Jan '17 9:09:53 PM QuarrelsomeChevon
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** Aeolus is half-insane and highly stressed out from trying to please all of the gods. And that is with his normal duties. They don't even make him a full god only a vague "master." In a sense, the four winds have more prestigious positions than him. This is on top of whatever other mistreatment the Olympians have dumped on him over the centuries. Capturing the storm spirits is one other thing on top of his normal stressful duties that he has to attend to while they party. And given how powerful they are and Zeus is lord of the sky it would be a lot easier if they helped instead of dumping it all on him. The Olympians mistreating the lesser gods and said lesser gods taking it out on others has been a reoccurring theme of the series.

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** Aeolus is half-insane and highly stressed out from trying to please all of the gods. And that is with his normal duties. They don't even make him a full god only a vague "master." In a sense, the four winds have more prestigious positions than him. This is on top of whatever other mistreatment the Olympians have dumped on him over the centuries. Capturing the storm spirits is one other thing on top of his normal stressful duties that he has to attend to while they party. And given how powerful they are and Zeus is lord of the sky it would be a lot easier if they helped instead of dumping it all on him. The Olympians mistreating the lesser gods and said lesser gods taking it out on others has been a reoccurring theme of the series.series.

* When Jason, Leo, and Piper are confronted by Lycaon in ''The Lost Hero'', wasn't it said that Leo checked his tool belt for weapons made of silver, and came up with nothing? Then at the Wolf House, he helps fight off the wolves using hammers with silver heads. Why didn't he use those earlier?
2nd Jan '17 9:24:56 PM seekquaze1
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2nd Jan '17 9:24:31 PM seekquaze1
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*** The Giants were initially played up to be the bigger threat since they were specifically designed to counter the Olympians and required a demigod to help kill them. In practice, the Titans were the large threat and Typhon large than either. The gods had already face the Titans before as well when the Titans were stronger and the gods the weaker party. The Titans only became a threat because Zeus refused to do anything about them until it was too late. Either way, performing heroic services beyond fighting standard monsters and getting some sort of compensation is kind of expected just like civilians or military personal who perform above and beyond what is expected are recognized.



* In ''The Lost Hero'', Boreas states that Aeolus is upset with the gods because both times they defeated Typhon (in ancient times and during ''The Last Olympian''), his defeat launched the release of dozens of storm spirits that answered to no one, and it was Aeous's job to hunt them all down. Supposedly, the gods never apologized and never offered to help with this, which is why he's so miffed that he had the wind gods kill off any half-bloods that came to see them. Even if the gods ''have'' done some morally questionable things in the past, though, and them apologizing would be a ''nice'' thing to do, I still don't see why he has a right to be that upset - it's like not it's the fault of the Olympians that Typhon managed to escape and that they had to defeat him again, and they all spent several days trying to stop him, putting off the protection of Olympus to do so, ''and'' Aeolus is supposed to be the "Master of Winds". Why does he expect the gods to help him with things that are his duty to perform?

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* In ''The Lost Hero'', Boreas states that Aeolus is upset with the gods because both times they defeated Typhon (in ancient times and during ''The Last Olympian''), his defeat launched the release of dozens of storm spirits that answered to no one, and it was Aeous's job to hunt them all down. Supposedly, the gods never apologized and never offered to help with this, which is why he's so miffed that he had the wind gods kill off any half-bloods that came to see them. Even if the gods ''have'' done some morally questionable things in the past, though, and them apologizing would be a ''nice'' thing to do, I still don't see why he has a right to be that upset - it's like not it's the fault of the Olympians that Typhon managed to escape and that they had to defeat him again, and they all spent several days trying to stop him, putting off the protection of Olympus to do so, ''and'' Aeolus is supposed to be the "Master of Winds". Why does he expect the gods to help him with things that are his duty to perform?perform?
** Aeolus is half-insane and highly stressed out from trying to please all of the gods. And that is with his normal duties. They don't even make him a full god only a vague "master." In a sense, the four winds have more prestigious positions than him. This is on top of whatever other mistreatment the Olympians have dumped on him over the centuries. Capturing the storm spirits is one other thing on top of his normal stressful duties that he has to attend to while they party. And given how powerful they are and Zeus is lord of the sky it would be a lot easier if they helped instead of dumping it all on him. The Olympians mistreating the lesser gods and said lesser gods taking it out on others has been a reoccurring theme of the series.
12th Dec '16 10:23:43 AM QuarrelsomeChevon
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** I haven't read most of the books in this series, so I might be stepping into uncharted territory with this, but...it's also possible that Kronos was simply a bigger threat to the gods than the giants, or at least a less familiar one. In mythology, the gods had already faced the giants once before, and that was the source of the procedure where they would need a mortal's help to help them do it. So the demigods helping them in this instance is probably considered less "Going above and beyond" than simply doing what they would be expected to do under those circumstances. Poseidon even starts to compare Percy to Hercules (the mortal who helped the gods during the first Gigantomachy) at the end of ''The Last Olympian'', implying that not even he would've been expected to defend Olympus from the Titans and defeat Kronos in the absence of the gods.
5th Dec '16 8:20:35 AM QuarrelsomeChevon
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* When Percy meets Octavion, Percy says that he reminds him of someone. Who is he talking about?

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* When Percy meets Octavion, Percy says that he reminds him of someone. Who is he talking about?about?

* In ''The Lost Hero'', Boreas states that Aeolus is upset with the gods because both times they defeated Typhon (in ancient times and during ''The Last Olympian''), his defeat launched the release of dozens of storm spirits that answered to no one, and it was Aeous's job to hunt them all down. Supposedly, the gods never apologized and never offered to help with this, which is why he's so miffed that he had the wind gods kill off any half-bloods that came to see them. Even if the gods ''have'' done some morally questionable things in the past, though, and them apologizing would be a ''nice'' thing to do, I still don't see why he has a right to be that upset - it's like not it's the fault of the Olympians that Typhon managed to escape and that they had to defeat him again, and they all spent several days trying to stop him, putting off the protection of Olympus to do so, ''and'' Aeolus is supposed to be the "Master of Winds". Why does he expect the gods to help him with things that are his duty to perform?
11th Nov '16 7:25:41 AM Nintendoer
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*** Yeah, I think the book mentions at one point that the Mist has a breaking point, and being kidnapped by a monstrous giant working for a protogenoi stretched it beyond its limits



** Yeah, I think the book mentions at one point that the Mist has a breaking point, and being kidnapped by a monstrous giant working for a protogenoi stretched it beyond its limits.

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** Yeah, I think the book mentions at one point that the Mist has a breaking point, and being kidnapped by a monstrous giant working for a protogenoi stretched it beyond its limits.
11th Nov '16 7:23:21 AM Nintendoer
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**Yeah, I think the book mentions at one point that the Mist has a breaking point, and being kidnapped by a monstrous giant working for a protogenoi stretched it beyond its limits.
11th Nov '16 7:19:06 AM Nintendoer
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** I'm pretty sure Rick changed it to that he has to concentrate to stay dry instead of the other way around, similar to how Leo is immune to fire when he concentrates. Sword of hades (a short story from The Demigod Files also says he has to concentrate to stay dry.

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** I'm pretty sure Rick changed it to that he has to concentrate to stay dry instead of the other way around, similar to how Leo is immune to fire when he concentrates. The Sword of hades Hades (a short story from The Demigod Files Files) also says he has to concentrate to stay dry.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Headscratchers.TheHeroesOfOlympus