History Headscratchers / StartrekTheNextGeneration

25th Oct '17 2:05:49 PM costanton11
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** The love she feels for him is akin to what one might feel for a soul mate, but without any sexual or romantic feelings. Basically, they're friendship soulmates (or whatever you want to call it). Pardon the cornyness.

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** The love she feels for him is akin to what one might feel for a soul mate, but without any sexual or romantic feelings. Basically, they're friendship soulmates (or whatever you want to call it). Pardon the cornyness.corniness.



** And here in lies the problem with the Kataan's whole strategy in that there is no guarantee that you will A) get someone that gives a damn about you or your problems, B) find someone who is willing/able to help if you do, and C) that the person in question wouldn't be so pissed off by the whole thing that they don't just ignore you out of spite (imagine if Picard was a klingon or a cardassian and you'll see the problem). Picard is the captain of the Federation flagship, the idea that he would have the time to sit down and write a concise non-fiction book using nothing but the contents of his memory is absurd. They are lucky that he continued playing his flute.

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** And here in lies the problem with the Kataan's whole strategy in that there is no guarantee that you will A) get someone that gives a damn about you or your problems, B) find someone who is willing/able to help if you do, and C) that the person in question wouldn't be so pissed off by the whole thing that they don't just ignore you out of spite (imagine if Picard was a klingon Klingon or a cardassian and you'll see the problem). Picard is the captain of the Federation flagship, the idea that he would have the time to sit down and write a concise non-fiction book using nothing but the contents of his memory is absurd. They are lucky that he continued playing his flute.



*** "Almost certain" may be pushing it, but it's well-established that Picard has an intense interest in archeology--to the point that he nearly pursued it as a career--and scientific discovery in general. It would be tremendously out of character for Picard, who describes himself first and foremost as an explorer, to keep the discovery of a heretofore unknown civilization and its culture to himself. If he were inclined to do so, why would Starfleet put him in command of a ship whose express, stated mission is to "...Explore strange new worlds, [and] to seek out new life and new civilizations...," if he's just going to keep it to himself every time a mission affects him personally in any way? The question then becomes, ''did Picard fulfill his duty to report the experiences to Startfleet and to the scientific community in accordance with the ''Enterprise's'' mission--a mission that is so important, he recites it in the opening narration of'' every single episode--''or did he keep it to himself?''

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*** "Almost certain" may be pushing it, but it's well-established that Picard has an intense interest in archeology--to the point that he nearly pursued it as a career--and scientific discovery in general. It would be tremendously out of character for Picard, who describes himself first and foremost as an explorer, to keep the discovery of a heretofore unknown civilization and its culture to himself. If he were inclined to do so, why would Starfleet put him in command of a ship whose express, stated mission is to "...Explore strange new worlds, [and] to seek out new life and new civilizations...," if he's just going to keep it to himself every time a mission affects him personally in any way? The question then becomes, ''did Picard fulfill his duty to report the experiences to Startfleet Starfleet and to the scientific community in accordance with the ''Enterprise's'' mission--a mission that is so important, he recites it in the opening narration of'' every single episode--''or did he keep it to himself?''



** Starfleet has a history of screwing people over when it comes to promotions. For example Harry Kim spent seven years as an Ensign despite being a senior bridge officer, having saved the ship multiple times, frequently commanding the night shift and working closely with the Captain and the XO. Paris on the other hand gets an immediate promotion to Lieutenant after a day despite having a record of insubordination which ''led to the deaths of several people,'' later on gets reduced in rank back to Ensign for trying to commit a terrorist action only to have Janeway promote him back to Lieutenant again a few episodes later despite doing nothing more remarkable than Kim did in that time. Then there is Hoshi Sato who spent ''ten years'' as an Ensign on the most important and acclaimed ship in the fleet despite being a senior officer and revolutionizing inter-species communication by inventing the basis of the Universal Translator. Tom is joining a long list of people the supposedly fair and just Federation have just flat out ignored in favour of someone else for no justifiable reason.

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** Starfleet has a history of screwing people over when it comes to promotions. For example Harry Kim spent seven years as an Ensign despite being a senior bridge officer, having saved the ship multiple times, frequently commanding the night shift and working closely with the Captain and the XO. Paris on the other hand gets an immediate promotion to Lieutenant after a day despite having a record of insubordination which ''led to the deaths of several people,'' later on gets reduced in rank back to Ensign for trying to commit a terrorist action only to have Janeway promote him back to Lieutenant again a few episodes later despite doing nothing more remarkable than Kim did in that time. Then there is Hoshi Sato who spent ''ten years'' as an Ensign on the most important and acclaimed ship in the fleet despite being a senior officer and revolutionizing inter-species communication by inventing the basis of the Universal Translator. Tom is joining a long list of people the supposedly fair and just Federation have just flat out ignored in favour favor of someone else for no justifiable reason.



** It leads to a nice bit of CharacterDevelopment when she later decides to take the command exam in "Thine Own Self", but that just emphasises that she shouldn't have been in command at the time!

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** It leads to a nice bit of CharacterDevelopment when she later decides to take the command exam in "Thine Own Self", but that just emphasises emphasizes that she shouldn't have been in command at the time!



*** The mistake here if there is one is the wardrobe department's limited colouring scheme. Science/medical blue is a reasonable one to group together perhaps, but command/operations? security/engineering? These are completely separate fields. A fourth or even fifth colour or shade is desperately needed here. The red uniform featured in films 2 through 7 due to having markedly different insignia and palette depending on department is currently the only uniform that would make any real world sense.

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*** The mistake here if there is one is the wardrobe department's limited colouring coloring scheme. Science/medical blue is a reasonable one to group together perhaps, but command/operations? security/engineering? These are completely separate fields. A fourth or even fifth colour color or shade is desperately needed here. The red uniform featured in films 2 through 7 due to having markedly different insignia and palette depending on department is currently the only uniform that would make any real world sense.



*** It seems to been a general trend in the show not just with Troi. There was more focus on characters' "extraordinary" abilities when the show started out. Early episodes made more use of Geordi's VISOR (even at one point having him be sent to look at something out of a window), Data's android abilities (the very first episode had him working as a tape recorder), Wesley's mathematical genius nature and Troi's empathy. While most of these things remained around, the writers realised that they weren't really needed and so they used them sparingly. Geordi became the chief engineer and his being blind was much less necessary. While Data was still an android and we'd still get the occasional gag, he could still function just as the brilliant science officer. Most people preferred Wesley just being an ordinary kid who helped out in engineering and didn't say much rather than a super genius. Troi however suffered more than the other characters, since her abilities were the main thing that justified her being on the bridge. When she started out, her abilities could have been genuinely useful and she could have been a genuinely functional part of the bridge crew. In the later years, it became less and less justified for the ship's counsellor not to simply be spending her days counselling people instead.

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*** It seems to been a general trend in the show not just with Troi. There was more focus on characters' "extraordinary" abilities when the show started out. Early episodes made more use of Geordi's VISOR (even at one point having him be sent to look at something out of a window), Data's android abilities (the very first episode had him working as a tape recorder), Wesley's mathematical genius nature and Troi's empathy. While most of these things remained around, the writers realised realized that they weren't really needed and so they used them sparingly. Geordi became the chief engineer and his being blind was much less necessary. While Data was still an android and we'd still get the occasional gag, he could still function just as the brilliant science officer. Most people preferred Wesley just being an ordinary kid who helped out in engineering and didn't say much rather than a super genius. Troi however suffered more than the other characters, since her abilities were the main thing that justified her being on the bridge. When she started out, her abilities could have been genuinely useful and she could have been a genuinely functional part of the bridge crew. In the later years, it became less and less justified for the ship's counsellor not to simply be spending her days counselling counseling people instead.



** This is probably the result of Wesley's [[TheScrappy scrappydom,]] people have the tendancy to conveniently forget all the good and worthwhile things Wesley DOES end up doing due to the often irrational and baseless hatred that people have for him. He doesn't do any less or screw up any more than any other member of the crew does, impressive considering he's a kid.

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** This is probably the result of Wesley's [[TheScrappy scrappydom,]] people have the tendancy tendency to conveniently forget all the good and worthwhile things Wesley DOES end up doing due to the often irrational and baseless hatred that people have for him. He doesn't do any less or screw up any more than any other member of the crew does, impressive considering he's a kid.



** Janeway made a very good point to Chakotay in an early episode of ''Voyager'' when they were deciding on what jobs the Maquis crewmembers should fill on board ship: ''How can we expect seasoned Starfleet officers to take orders from someone who did not even go to the academy?'' And you know what? she is absolutely correct; only their desperate situation made allowances understandable. If I spent years training to earn my uniform and commission and then some kid comes along who had seemingly everything handed to him for free, I know I would resent that person. And if even a single one of those resentful people learn of Picard's relationship with Dr Crusher, good job deflecting the mass nepotism claims.

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** Janeway made a very good point to Chakotay in an early episode of ''Voyager'' when they were deciding on what jobs the Maquis crewmembers crew members should fill on board ship: ''How can we expect seasoned Starfleet officers to take orders from someone who did not even go to the academy?'' And you know what? she is absolutely correct; only their desperate situation made allowances understandable. If I spent years training to earn my uniform and commission and then some kid comes along who had seemingly everything handed to him for free, I know I would resent that person. And if even a single one of those resentful people learn of Picard's relationship with Dr Crusher, good job deflecting the mass nepotism claims.



* So we've seen several times in Star Trek that Starfleet is quite strict with its uniform code; Riker tells Ro to lose the Bajoran earring in "Ensign Ro", Tuvok tells Gerren the same in "Learning Curve", plus Chell with his necklace and Henley's headband. Captain Jellico even has Troi put on a proper uniform in "Chain of Command" instead of those god-awful leotards she had. Yet Worf... always gets to wear the massive and very noticable gold and later silver baldric. Why? I know starship uniform code is down to the captain, and Picard never seemed that bothered (see "Generations" for an example) by neither Sisko or even Jellico (or whoever Worf served for before the Enterprise, if there was one) had a problem with it. You'd think something that big and bulky would be more of a problem than an earring or a headband (and let's not forget that Nog even got to wear one of those Ferengi headdresses as both a cadet and an officer. In fact it caused confusion in "Conundrum" as Worf thought he was the captain as he was more elaborately dressed than everyone else. Either lose the baldric, or let the poor Bajoran wear their earrings!
** On the other hand both Ro in ''Ensign Ro'' and Gerren, Chell and Henley in ''Learning Curve'' were seen as troublemakers or worse, and Troi wearing the leotards was apparently in line with something of a ''tradition'' of permissability for officers in specialised positions non-specific to Picard, suggesting that Starfleet might actually generally be fairly relaxed with its uniform code (after all, while they very, very rarely were actually seen the Federation does include some members that would have problems ''physically'' complying with the code) -- when Worf meets Jellico he has years of service as an able, for the most part loyal officer. Ro and Gerren... don't (and you'll notice that once she ''has'' proved herself as having potential over the course of ''Ensign Ro'', Picard does agree to let her wear the earring). There's also that Worf's duties more than once involved interacting with Klingons, for which the baldric served as a useful visual marker that despite the Starfleet uniform Worf still remembers his Klingon heritage.

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* So we've seen several times in Star Trek that Starfleet is quite strict with its uniform code; Riker tells Ro to lose the Bajoran earring in "Ensign Ro", Tuvok tells Gerren the same in "Learning Curve", plus Chell with his necklace and Henley's headband. Captain Jellico even has Troi put on a proper uniform in "Chain of Command" instead of those god-awful leotards she had. Yet Worf... always gets to wear the massive and very noticable noticeable gold and later silver baldric. Why? I know starship uniform code is down to the captain, and Picard never seemed that bothered (see "Generations" for an example) by neither Sisko or even Jellico (or whoever Worf served for before the Enterprise, if there was one) had a problem with it. You'd think something that big and bulky would be more of a problem than an earring or a headband (and let's not forget that Nog even got to wear one of those Ferengi headdresses as both a cadet and an officer. In fact it caused confusion in "Conundrum" as Worf thought he was the captain as he was more elaborately dressed than everyone else. Either lose the baldric, or let the poor Bajoran wear their earrings!
** On the other hand both Ro in ''Ensign Ro'' and Gerren, Chell and Henley in ''Learning Curve'' were seen as troublemakers or worse, and Troi wearing the leotards was apparently in line with something of a ''tradition'' of permissability permissibility for officers in specialised specialized positions non-specific to Picard, suggesting that Starfleet might actually generally be fairly relaxed with its uniform code (after all, while they very, very rarely were actually seen the Federation does include some members that would have problems ''physically'' complying with the code) -- when Worf meets Jellico he has years of service as an able, for the most part loyal officer. Ro and Gerren... don't (and you'll notice that once she ''has'' proved herself as having potential over the course of ''Ensign Ro'', Picard does agree to let her wear the earring). There's also that Worf's duties more than once involved interacting with Klingons, for which the baldric served as a useful visual marker that despite the Starfleet uniform Worf still remembers his Klingon heritage.



*** A large portion of the world's population ''is'' dying of easily treatable diseases. And considering that the percentage of the pre-Columbian population of the Americas killed by European diseases, especially smallpox, is now estimated in the neighbourhood of 90%, you can see how easily the positive medical benefits of contact are outweighed by the negative. Whenever apologists for colonialism invoke medicine as a justification, there's an edge of "the primitives would never have developed any of this on their own were it not for the civilized Europeans showing them what to do" when it's easy to see that contact caused far more problems than it ever solved.

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*** A large portion of the world's population ''is'' dying of easily treatable diseases. And considering that the percentage of the pre-Columbian population of the Americas killed by European diseases, especially smallpox, is now estimated in the neighbourhood neighborhood of 90%, you can see how easily the positive medical benefits of contact are outweighed by the negative. Whenever apologists for colonialism invoke medicine as a justification, there's an edge of "the primitives would never have developed any of this on their own were it not for the civilized Europeans showing them what to do" when it's easy to see that contact caused far more problems than it ever solved.



** I find the speed of ''Enterprise'' constantly problematic. Obviously, you don't want to run your engines ragged, but on more occasions then I can count Picard lets the ''Enterprise'' waddle along like it's a cruise ship, no matter the circumstances. Hey, Captain? Why are you pissing around at Warp 2 (Ten times the speed of light) when you ''could'' be travelling at Warp 9 (One thousand, five hundred and sixteen times the speed of light)? At the former, you'll travel a light year in five weeks; at the latter, '''''six hours'''''. Do you just like taking the scenic route?

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** I find the speed of ''Enterprise'' constantly problematic. Obviously, you don't want to run your engines ragged, but on more occasions then I can count Picard lets the ''Enterprise'' waddle along like it's a cruise ship, no matter the circumstances. Hey, Captain? Why are you pissing around at Warp 2 (Ten times the speed of light) when you ''could'' be travelling traveling at Warp 9 (One thousand, five hundred and sixteen times the speed of light)? At the former, you'll travel a light year in five weeks; at the latter, '''''six hours'''''. Do you just like taking the scenic route?



** ''Did anyone keep any tally of how many of red-shirted ensigns died on board the Enterprise during TNG, out of its total crew?'' Well... there's Haskell ("Where Silence Has Lease"), Dern ("Genesis"), Monroe ("Disaster", she was a Lt), Singh ("The Lonely Among Us", goldshirt), Van Mayer ("In Theory", goldshirt), two security guards ("Heart of Glory"), Aster ("The Bonding", blueshirt), Fang-lee ("Ethics", unseen), Kwan ("Eye of the Beholder", goldshirt), Brooks ("The Loss", unseen), Yar ("Skin of Evil"), Corelki, Frankin and 1 other guard ("Descent"), plus the larger numbers of offscreen redshirts, such as in "Q Who" and "Best of Both Worlds" against the Borg, 8 to the Bersailles III firestorms ("Lessons"), and 3 to the Ansata terrorists ("The High Ground"), and those are just off the top of my head. Probably still not as many as Kirk, who as far as I remember lost around a quarter of his crews worth during TOS.

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** ''Did anyone keep any tally of how many of red-shirted ensigns died on board the Enterprise during TNG, out of its total crew?'' Well... there's Haskell ("Where Silence Has Lease"), Dern ("Genesis"), Monroe ("Disaster", she was a Lt), Singh ("The Lonely Among Us", goldshirt), gold shirt), Van Mayer ("In Theory", goldshirt), gold shirt), two security guards ("Heart of Glory"), Aster ("The Bonding", blueshirt), blue shirt), Fang-lee ("Ethics", unseen), Kwan ("Eye of the Beholder", goldshirt), gold shirt), Brooks ("The Loss", unseen), Yar ("Skin of Evil"), Corelki, Frankin and 1 other guard ("Descent"), plus the larger numbers of offscreen redshirts, such as in "Q Who" and "Best of Both Worlds" against the Borg, 8 to the Bersailles III firestorms ("Lessons"), and 3 to the Ansata terrorists ("The High Ground"), and those are just off the top of my head. Probably still not as many as Kirk, who as far as I remember lost around a quarter of his crews worth during TOS.



*** Are ''you'' going to separate your battle and saucer sections when you have Romulans after you on every side? It's no good separating the suacer if the battle has already caught you off guard.

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*** Are ''you'' going to separate your battle and saucer sections when you have Romulans after you on every side? It's no good separating the suacer saucer if the battle has already caught you off guard.



*** In second season "Where Silence Has No Lease" Picard and Riker set the Enterprise to self destruct in 20 minutes. They avoid it in the end, but you can imagine all the traumatised parents and kids as they awaited their doom... for ''20 minutes''.

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*** In second season "Where Silence Has No Lease" Picard and Riker set the Enterprise to self destruct in 20 minutes. They avoid it in the end, but you can imagine all the traumatised traumatized parents and kids as they awaited their doom... for ''20 minutes''.



** '''Answer 3:''' From an in-universe perspective, too many different political interests getting in the way of designing the ship (see ''Film/ThePentagonWars'' for a RealLife example of what I mean). An efficient design (like that of the ''Constitutions'') would have meant having the ''Galaxy''-class explorer as the best warship of that size with the addition of state-of-the-art sensors (comparable to the most recent dedicated scouts), a capable but non excessive stellar cartography department, some laboratories to examine the most likely phenomenons and samples they were likely to encounter and a large number of non-replicable spare parts, all of it done with efficient use of space, no unnecessary personnel (if we stretch it we could justify Guinan for the morale value, but not many more) and the most reliable systems available. What they got instead was a ship with the firepower and shields she was supposed to have but subpar shields, excessively extensive labs, extremely inefficient use of space (see the command bridge, the large luxury suites for the crews and the entire ''decks'' with no specific purpose for some examples), little to no non-replicable spare parts, tons of unnecessary personnel (including the children. This one was openly criticized by Picard himself), and infamously unreliable systems (the holodeck's tendence to malfunction, the transporters' biofilters regularly failing to detect and isolate new pathogens, the tendency of the warp core to blow up at the first hit and inability to throw it out when necessary, and the complete lack of redundancy in the safeties). I hope the responsible were thrown in a penal camp after the ''Yamato'' exploded...
** It strikes me that the Enterprise may be one of the most advanced (if not THE most advanced) starship out there but it really ''hasn't'' been designed with all out battle in mind. Look at how easily the shields are knocked down by REAL battle-ships like Birds of Prey. It pushes more importance into other types of technology (Stellar Cartography, for example, does ''anyone'' actally know what the heck that's good for, except for predicting how galaxies will look in two million years time?) Sure it has huge weapons, photon torpedoes and phasers and the like, but it's still not exactly... designed with war in mind, I mean ''look at it''. Does that really ''look'' like a warship? (Compare the Enterprise D to the Enterprise E, which was better outfitted for battle, to clarify what a star ship that was ''really'' designed for big battles looks like).

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** '''Answer 3:''' From an in-universe perspective, too many different political interests getting in the way of designing the ship (see ''Film/ThePentagonWars'' for a RealLife example of what I mean). An efficient design (like that of the ''Constitutions'') would have meant having the ''Galaxy''-class explorer as the best warship of that size with the addition of state-of-the-art sensors (comparable to the most recent dedicated scouts), a capable but non excessive stellar cartography department, some laboratories to examine the most likely phenomenons and samples they were likely to encounter and a large number of non-replicable spare parts, all of it done with efficient use of space, no unnecessary personnel (if we stretch it we could justify Guinan for the morale value, but not many more) and the most reliable systems available. What they got instead was a ship with the firepower and shields she was supposed to have but subpar shields, excessively extensive labs, extremely inefficient use of space (see the command bridge, the large luxury suites for the crews and the entire ''decks'' with no specific purpose for some examples), little to no non-replicable spare parts, tons of unnecessary personnel (including the children. This one was openly criticized by Picard himself), and infamously unreliable systems (the holodeck's tendence tendency to malfunction, the transporters' biofilters regularly failing to detect and isolate new pathogens, the tendency of the warp core to blow up at the first hit and inability to throw it out when necessary, and the complete lack of redundancy in the safeties). I hope the responsible were thrown in a penal camp after the ''Yamato'' exploded...
** It strikes me that the Enterprise may be one of the most advanced (if not THE most advanced) starship out there but it really ''hasn't'' been designed with all out battle in mind. Look at how easily the shields are knocked down by REAL battle-ships like Birds of Prey. It pushes more importance into other types of technology (Stellar Cartography, for example, does ''anyone'' actally actually know what the heck that's good for, except for predicting how galaxies will look in two million years time?) Sure it has huge weapons, photon torpedoes and phasers and the like, but it's still not exactly... designed with war in mind, I mean ''look at it''. Does that really ''look'' like a warship? (Compare the Enterprise D to the Enterprise E, which was better outfitted for battle, to clarify what a star ship that was ''really'' designed for big battles looks like).



*** Historically speaking, explorers were fully equipped ships of war that also embarked scientists and their equipment (with the carthographic part usually done by the military crew, as they were equipped for that on their own). And in fact the ''Galaxy''-class explorers ''are'' fitted as warships even before the Dominion War (in [[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS5E14Conundrum "Conundrum"]] the amnesiac crew concludes the ''Enterprise'' is, in their own word, a '''''battleship''''' upon taking a look to the ship's characteristics). My guess is that there were too many different political interests plaguing the ship, with the end result being a ship with not enough necessary equipment (more powerful shields and non-replicable spare parts, to name two), too much non-necessary equipment (excessive labs, for example, given the existence of dedicated science ships), bad use of the space (excessively large bridge and crew quarters and entire unused ''decks''), and children on board, with some corners cut in the wrong places (the excessively volatile warp core is the first one that comes to mind). One good thing that came from the encounter with the Borg and the Dominion War was that those interests were wiped out, resulting in overhauled ''Galaxies'' that are better equipped for all their missions, ''including combat''.

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*** Historically speaking, explorers were fully equipped ships of war that also embarked scientists and their equipment (with the carthographic cartographic part usually done by the military crew, as they were equipped for that on their own). And in fact the ''Galaxy''-class explorers ''are'' fitted as warships even before the Dominion War (in [[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS5E14Conundrum "Conundrum"]] the amnesiac crew concludes the ''Enterprise'' is, in their own word, a '''''battleship''''' upon taking a look to the ship's characteristics). My guess is that there were too many different political interests plaguing the ship, with the end result being a ship with not enough necessary equipment (more powerful shields and non-replicable spare parts, to name two), too much non-necessary equipment (excessive labs, for example, given the existence of dedicated science ships), bad use of the space (excessively large bridge and crew quarters and entire unused ''decks''), and children on board, with some corners cut in the wrong places (the excessively volatile warp core is the first one that comes to mind). One good thing that came from the encounter with the Borg and the Dominion War was that those interests were wiped out, resulting in overhauled ''Galaxies'' that are better equipped for all their missions, ''including combat''.



---->Conversation from the episode "Q Who" in which 18 crewmembers were abducted from the ''Enterprise'' and presumably assimilated by the here-to-fore unknown Borg threat:

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---->Conversation from the episode "Q Who" in which 18 crewmembers crew members were abducted from the ''Enterprise'' and presumably assimilated by the here-to-fore unknown Borg threat:



*** Just think about how traumatised the kids were after Genesis, or when they all suffered hallucinations due to the alien telepathy in Night Terrors.

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*** Just think about how traumatised traumatized the kids were after Genesis, or when they all suffered hallucinations due to the alien telepathy in Night Terrors.



*** Except that even in the 18th and early 19th centuries they weren't so blase about the risks, because even then the only 'kids' they allowed on board were cabin-boys and powder-monkeys, ie, crew members.

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*** Except that even in the 18th and early 19th centuries they weren't so blase blasé about the risks, because even then the only 'kids' they allowed on board were cabin-boys and powder-monkeys, ie, crew members.



*** About the size and shape of the Enterprise and other Starfleet ships, all interstellar spaceships in the Star Trek universe have near flawless targeting systems and all weapons reach their targets instantanously, so designing a spaceship to be able to dodge, otherwise avoid attacks, or "fire at broadside" is largely pointless, which is also the reason we never see either ship moving about during a battle.

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*** About the size and shape of the Enterprise and other Starfleet ships, all interstellar spaceships in the Star Trek universe have near flawless targeting systems and all weapons reach their targets instantanously, instantaneously, so designing a spaceship to be able to dodge, otherwise avoid attacks, or "fire at broadside" is largely pointless, which is also the reason we never see either ship moving about during a battle.



** My wonder is; is it really a space ship that dangerous for the 24 th century standards? We see space stations and colonies suffering similar treats that the Enterprise, entire colonies wipe out, and so on, seems like living outside the Solar System is dangerous anyway. Also not every episode were about the Enterprise about to be destroyed, a big chunk of episodes deal with treats that never endangered the people inside the ship, only crewmen who left (like Wesley in Justice).

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** My wonder is; is it really a space ship that dangerous for the 24 th 24th century standards? We see space stations and colonies suffering similar treats that the Enterprise, entire colonies wipe out, and so on, seems like living outside the Solar System is dangerous anyway. Also not every episode were about the Enterprise about to be destroyed, a big chunk of episodes deal with treats that never endangered the people inside the ship, only crewmen who left (like Wesley in Justice).



** Living ''within'' the Solar System isn't safe. Earth has come under direct threat at least four times. Twice with the Borg, the whale probe from Star Trek IV, and V'Ger from The Motion Picture. Possibly even more. At least on the Enterprise (or any other starship) you can be proactive in sorting the problem. Planetside you just have to sit and wait and hope Starfleet makes it in time to bail you out.

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** Living ''within'' the Solar System isn't safe. Earth has come under direct threat at least four times. Twice with the Borg, the whale probe from Star Trek IV, and V'Ger from The Motion Picture. Possibly even more. At least on the Enterprise (or any other starship) you can be proactive in sorting the problem. Planetside Planet side you just have to sit and wait and hope Starfleet makes it in time to bail you out.



Of course, as we all know, the first Federation-Cardassian conflict ended with a compromise treaty in which concessions were made by both sides, a result regarded by contemporary political observers as deeply unsatisfying to both parties. In such a situation, perhaps it seemed politically necessary to abandon the civilians who had colonized contested planets to strengthen the Federation's pre-war claim; while this may seem a stunningly cynical allegation against the supposedly idealistic and morally enlightened Federation, it is perhaps not so shocking in light of the fact that the Federation eventually chose to carry out exactly such an abandonment. It's also not such a shocking claim in light of Starfleet's established willingness to callously throw non-combatants into deadly danger -- even the Great Picard blithely dragged a shipful of families ''including minor children'' into armed standoffs, booby traps, spatial anomalies, temporal vortices, skirmishes just shy of outright warfare with the Klingons, the Romulans, the Cardassians, the Borg -- hell, at one point everybody on the whole ship was horribly mutated into a monstrously twisted amalgam of human and animal features like something out of H. P. Lovecraft's nightmares, and what's ''that'' going to do to a ten-year-old? And it still took ''years'' before anyone got the idea that maybe having your kids with you on a combat posting, or a posting that could suddenly ''become'' a combat posting at any instant, isn't such a great thing after all!\\

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Of course, as we all know, the first Federation-Cardassian conflict ended with a compromise treaty in which concessions were made by both sides, a result regarded by contemporary political observers as deeply unsatisfying to both parties. In such a situation, perhaps it seemed politically necessary to abandon the civilians who had colonized contested planets to strengthen the Federation's pre-war claim; while this may seem a stunningly cynical allegation against the supposedly idealistic and morally enlightened Federation, it is perhaps not so shocking in light of the fact that the Federation eventually chose to carry out exactly such an abandonment. It's also not such a shocking claim in light of Starfleet's established willingness to callously throw non-combatants into deadly danger -- even the Great Picard blithely dragged a shipful shipfull of families ''including minor children'' into armed standoffs, booby traps, spatial anomalies, temporal vortices, skirmishes just shy of outright warfare with the Klingons, the Romulans, the Cardassians, the Borg -- hell, at one point everybody on the whole ship was horribly mutated into a monstrously twisted amalgam of human and animal features like something out of H. P. Lovecraft's nightmares, and what's ''that'' going to do to a ten-year-old? And it still took ''years'' before anyone got the idea that maybe having your kids with you on a combat posting, or a posting that could suddenly ''become'' a combat posting at any instant, isn't such a great thing after all!\\



** Lack of chairs is nothing, lack of anything regarding a pop-up shield for the window ought to have been a hanging offence (which says nothing about the fact that the ship even 'has' windows, I mean it's not like the people have anything to look at).

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** Lack of chairs is nothing, lack of anything regarding a pop-up shield for the window ought to have been a hanging offence offense (which says nothing about the fact that the ship even 'has' windows, I mean it's not like the people have anything to look at).



*** Actually, it's a "viewscreen", as in "a ginormous computer monitor". It's not a window, it recreates stuff that the sensor arrays (or probes, or relays, whatever) are scanning. Turn it off and all you'll get is black, or a recreation of a starfield.

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*** Actually, it's a "viewscreen", "view screen", as in "a ginormous computer monitor". It's not a window, it recreates stuff that the sensor arrays (or probes, or relays, whatever) are scanning. Turn it off and all you'll get is black, or a recreation of a starfield.



*** There was the episode where Ro and La Forge were phased out of normal existance (by a Romulan device, no less) - they were completely invisible to the Enterprise crew. The cloaking aspect may have been part and parcel of the phasing technology as light has a difficult time reflecting off of things it can't interact with.

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*** There was the episode where Ro and La Forge were phased out of normal existance existence (by a Romulan device, no less) - they were completely invisible to the Enterprise crew. The cloaking aspect may have been part and parcel of the phasing technology as light has a difficult time reflecting off of things it can't interact with.



* As far into the franchise timeline as [[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine [=DS=]9]]'s fifth season, the Federation is sending people to prison for performing genetic augmentation ''just to increase intelligence.'' But ''[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E7UnnaturalSelection Unnatural Selection]]'' has a Starfleet-sanctioned station (one would presume based on the use of Starfleet vessels for resupply runs) dedicated to producing children with enhanced intelligence, physical prowess, resistance to disease - oh, and they're all '''''telepaths and telekinetics'''''. Now, granted, at the time the Enterprise crew were knee-deep in figuring out the whole mysterious premature aging thing, but still - how is this ridiculously casual revelation from the Darwin station staff ''not'' greeted with utter horror by the crew? A few hundred years ago a relatively normal band of genetically-engineered humans sent Earth careening into world war, the aftereffects of which are still felt in the 24th-century Federation. Now we find a group of literal superhumans, and everyone's just, "Oh. Neat. So, about that aging virus..."

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* As far into the franchise timeline as [[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine [=DS=]9]]'s fifth season, the Federation is sending people to prison for performing genetic augmentation ''just to increase intelligence.'' But ''[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E7UnnaturalSelection Unnatural Selection]]'' has a Starfleet-sanctioned station (one would presume based on the use of Starfleet vessels for resupply runs) dedicated to producing children with enhanced intelligence, physical prowess, resistance to disease - oh, and they're all '''''telepaths and telekinetics'''''. Now, granted, at the time the Enterprise crew were knee-deep in figuring out the whole mysterious premature aging thing, but still - how is this ridiculously casual revelation from the Darwin station staff ''not'' greeted with utter horror by the crew? A few hundred years ago a relatively normal band of genetically-engineered humans sent Earth careening into world war, the aftereffects of which are still felt in the 24th-century Federation. Now we find a group of literal superhumans, super humans, and everyone's just, "Oh. Neat. So, about that aging virus..."



* Tasha Yar came from the human colony world of Turkana IV, which had apparently seceded from the Federation, devolved into civil war and eventually anarchy becoming a classic 80's post-apocalyptic dystopia where rape gangs roamed around and residents lived in fear and terror of the "Alliance" and the "Coalition", two former political parties that had now become basically giant, high-tech, street gangs. Now, it has been shown in several cases, most notably in "The Masterpeiece Society", that the Federation and Starfleet do not consider the Prime Directive to apply to human colonies, even if they are not actually a part of the Federation, or even are old, lost colonies that do not even know the Federation exists. Yet over the course of decades Starfleet never opted to undertake a serious military intervention on the planet, even knowing first-hand from Tasha what conditions were like for the people living there? In "The Masterpiece Society", a mere 23 citizens out of thousands from the Genome Colony demand transport off their planet, against the wishes of their government and in full knowledge that their departure will cause a social and genetic disruption in the carefully-planned colony. Picard makes it clear that he has no right to refuse a human's request for such refuge. Was Tasha seriously the ''only'' person that was unhappy with life on Turkana IV and wanted to leave? Or was Starfleet so averse to the prospect of armed conflict with the gangs that they were willing to just abandon any citizens of the colony that did not have the good fortune to make direct contact with a starship crew?

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* Tasha Yar came from the human colony world of Turkana IV, which had apparently seceded from the Federation, devolved into civil war and eventually anarchy becoming a classic 80's post-apocalyptic dystopia where rape gangs roamed around and residents lived in fear and terror of the "Alliance" and the "Coalition", two former political parties that had now become basically giant, high-tech, street gangs. Now, it has been shown in several cases, most notably in "The Masterpeiece Masterpiece Society", that the Federation and Starfleet do not consider the Prime Directive to apply to human colonies, even if they are not actually a part of the Federation, or even are old, lost colonies that do not even know the Federation exists. Yet over the course of decades Starfleet never opted to undertake a serious military intervention on the planet, even knowing first-hand from Tasha what conditions were like for the people living there? In "The Masterpiece Society", a mere 23 citizens out of thousands from the Genome Colony demand transport off their planet, against the wishes of their government and in full knowledge that their departure will cause a social and genetic disruption in the carefully-planned colony. Picard makes it clear that he has no right to refuse a human's request for such refuge. Was Tasha seriously the ''only'' person that was unhappy with life on Turkana IV and wanted to leave? Or was Starfleet so averse to the prospect of armed conflict with the gangs that they were willing to just abandon any citizens of the colony that did not have the good fortune to make direct contact with a starship crew?



* Naturally, the casting will dictate some interactions and it was already like that in TOS. That’s why Scotty could resurrect contrary to other Nomad’s victims or Chekov could make almost all jobs in Journey to Babel. In my opinion, these kind of oddities are sometime bigger in TNG. The main characters are sometime on a parallel circuit, not only Wesley the underage helmsman. Beeing a senior officer means to be a main character.

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* Naturally, the casting will dictate some interactions and it was already like that in TOS. That’s why Scotty could resurrect contrary to other Nomad’s victims or Chekov could make almost all jobs in Journey to Babel. In my opinion, these kind of oddities are sometime bigger in TNG. The main characters are sometime on a parallel circuit, not only Wesley the underage helmsman. Beeing Being a senior officer means to be a main character.



** The Enteprise-D is an exploration starship, but its science department is quite under involved. When Data was believed dead, he’s replaced by Worf, who seems to have the usual scientific background of a Starfleet officer but not the one to lead the science department. Data is the science officer. His position has simply been renamed for cosmetic reasons: the white make-up didn’t fit well with the blue uniform.
** Are the main characters all too shy to befriend their other crewmates except O’Brien and Ro? It’s not so frequent to see an “outsider” at their poker night.

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** The Enteprise-D Enterprise-D is an exploration starship, but its science department is quite under involved. When Data was believed dead, he’s replaced by Worf, who seems to have the usual scientific background of a Starfleet officer but not the one to lead the science department. Data is the science officer. His position has simply been renamed for cosmetic reasons: the white make-up didn’t fit well with the blue uniform.
** Are the main characters all too shy to befriend their other crewmates crew mates except O’Brien and Ro? It’s not so frequent to see an “outsider” at their poker night.



** Considering how rare Betazoid Starfleet personnel appear to be, it may be that they do. It is an interesting point that Betazoids are potentially of tremendous use. For example, they can detect cloaked ships by homing in on the thoughts of those aboard. Yet, for some reason, Deanna is the ''only'' (half-)Betazoid serving on the ''Enterprise'' (''D'' or ''E''), and she is generally limited to being TheEmpath. Now, we know that on ''Trek'' TheMainCharactersDoEverything, and they did not want her (already weak) character OvershadowedByAwesome. Which she would most certainly be if there were any true telepaths aboard. Noticeably, they never show Deanna mindspeaking to anyone on the crew who might be able to hear her, such as any of the Vulcans we have seen. One episode of ''Voyager'' established that they had a Betazoid crewmember (besides the [[MuggleBornOfMages mind blind]] Lon Suder). But she was ''never'' mentioned before or after, and there were plenty of times when Janeway could have used a better telepath than Tuvok or Kes! Given how little real privacy there is on a starship (the MasterComputer basically knows where you are, what you eat, what entertainments you enjoy and can even hypothetically eavesdrop on you via the ship's communication system), it says a '''lot''' about the fact that telepaths are such a rarity and that Starfleet does not appear to be actively recruiting Betazoids.
*** Voyager initially had two Betazoids on the crew; Stadi (killed in "Caretaker") and Jurot (the blueshirt seen in "Counterpoint") yet in "Dragon's Teeth", Janeway bemoaned the lack of a Betazoid! Same as that female Vulcan that appeared in one episode, who could have helped both Tuvok and Vorik through their Ponn Farrs but didn't and who wasn't there in "Counterpoint" when all the telepaths were being hidden.

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** Considering how rare Betazoid Starfleet personnel appear to be, it may be that they do. It is an interesting point that Betazoids are potentially of tremendous use. For example, they can detect cloaked ships by homing in on the thoughts of those aboard. Yet, for some reason, Deanna is the ''only'' (half-)Betazoid serving on the ''Enterprise'' (''D'' or ''E''), and she is generally limited to being TheEmpath. Now, we know that on ''Trek'' TheMainCharactersDoEverything, and they did not want her (already weak) character OvershadowedByAwesome. Which she would most certainly be if there were any true telepaths aboard. Noticeably, they never show Deanna mindspeaking mind speaking to anyone on the crew who might be able to hear her, such as any of the Vulcans we have seen. One episode of ''Voyager'' established that they had a Betazoid crewmember crew member (besides the [[MuggleBornOfMages mind blind]] Lon Suder). But she was ''never'' mentioned before or after, and there were plenty of times when Janeway could have used a better telepath than Tuvok or Kes! Given how little real privacy there is on a starship (the MasterComputer basically knows where you are, what you eat, what entertainments you enjoy and can even hypothetically eavesdrop on you via the ship's communication system), it says a '''lot''' about the fact that telepaths are such a rarity and that Starfleet does not appear to be actively recruiting Betazoids.
*** Voyager initially had two Betazoids on the crew; Stadi (killed in "Caretaker") and Jurot (the blueshirt blue shirt seen in "Counterpoint") yet in "Dragon's Teeth", Janeway bemoaned the lack of a Betazoid! Same as that female Vulcan that appeared in one episode, who could have helped both Tuvok and Vorik through their Ponn Pon Farrs but didn't and who wasn't there in "Counterpoint" when all the telepaths were being hidden.



** Data knows that it's a trap, so he can either not waste time analysing it (he knows it doesn't exist, therefore it holds no lasting interest for honest analysis), or if it has some kind of [[BrownNote infectious property]], sandbox his visual centres in advance and delete the memory or something. The Borg don't know this.
* Related question: Why was this shape never brought up as a potential method of attack in later encounters with the Borg? It wouldn't have to even solve anything, just spend 30 seconds of screentime to bring it up, send it with no effect and then have Data or other science person theorize the Borg may have since assimilated technology which led them to alter their visual processors and render the shape ineffective.

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** Data knows that it's a trap, so he can either not waste time analysing analyzing it (he knows it doesn't exist, therefore it holds no lasting interest for honest analysis), or if it has some kind of [[BrownNote infectious property]], sandbox his visual centres centers in advance and delete the memory or something. The Borg don't know this.
* Related question: Why was this shape never brought up as a potential method of attack in later encounters with the Borg? It wouldn't have to even solve anything, just spend 30 seconds of screentime screen time to bring it up, send it with no effect and then have Data or other science person theorize the Borg may have since assimilated technology which led them to alter their visual processors and render the shape ineffective.



** I suppose the most honest answer is that the Ferengi are straw men. A clever and observant critique of capitalism does not play out through them -- just crass obviousness. One might as well ask why they prohibit unions. Unions can be as profitable and as manipulative and exploitative as corporations. However, as far as the sexism goes, one might rationalize that the Ferengi aren't as good capitalists as they think they are. Perhaps the oppression of women pre-existed the rise of mercantile behaviour in Ferengi society, and values never quite "caught up."

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** I suppose the most honest answer is that the Ferengi are straw men. A clever and observant critique of capitalism does not play out through them -- just crass obviousness. One might as well ask why they prohibit unions. Unions can be as profitable and as manipulative and exploitative as corporations. However, as far as the sexism goes, one might rationalize that the Ferengi aren't as good capitalists as they think they are. Perhaps the oppression of women pre-existed the rise of mercantile behaviour behavior in Ferengi society, and values never quite "caught up."



** There are two points here. Firstly, the Klingon and Romulan Empires (and the Cardassian Union, for that matter) don't actually consist of several races under one banner. They are made up of dozens of planets they have colonised. In some cases there may have been intelligent sentients already there, but none of those three groups sound like the kind of people who'd be interested in peaceful cooperation. There are some references to conquered peoples in the ExpandedUniverse, but that's about it. Also, all the ships we see in the series are military vessels - even if there are subject peoples, it's entirely possible they are not permitted to join the military. As for the second point, it seems that, overwhelmingly, humans are the main volunteers for Starfleet. After all, there is no conscription or social obligation to serve, and it is probable that many or even most member civilizations contribute in some other way than by volunteering their teenagers for the military. There's also mention in at least one episode of an all-Vulcan crew. Perhaps most ships have a predominance of one species, and we only see the human ones.

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** There are two points here. Firstly, the Klingon and Romulan Empires (and the Cardassian Union, for that matter) don't actually consist of several races under one banner. They are made up of dozens of planets they have colonised.colonized. In some cases there may have been intelligent sentients already there, but none of those three groups sound like the kind of people who'd be interested in peaceful cooperation. There are some references to conquered peoples in the ExpandedUniverse, but that's about it. Also, all the ships we see in the series are military vessels - even if there are subject peoples, it's entirely possible they are not permitted to join the military. As for the second point, it seems that, overwhelmingly, humans are the main volunteers for Starfleet. After all, there is no conscription or social obligation to serve, and it is probable that many or even most member civilizations contribute in some other way than by volunteering their teenagers for the military. There's also mention in at least one episode of an all-Vulcan crew. Perhaps most ships have a predominance of one species, and we only see the human ones.



*** Between the Klingons first appearances in TOS and their appearances in [=TNG=], they'd had their original homeworld devastated in ST VI and a massive, humiliating defeat at the hands of the Romulans at Khitomer, leading to their decline as an empire and their forging an alliance with the Federation, which probably ended their territorial expansion. This lead to a period of stagnation in the Empire, leading the people to look backward and make a big deal about their past glories -- so scheming, conniving, bullying modern Klingons now pretend to be just like their ancient warrior ancestors, like a bunch of right wing nationalists in, say, Sweden, might latch on to the identity of the Vikings. I mean, aside from Worf and Martok, no Klingons on any series actually practiced what they preached.

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*** Between the Klingons first appearances in TOS and their appearances in [=TNG=], they'd had their original homeworld home world devastated in ST VI and a massive, humiliating defeat at the hands of the Romulans at Khitomer, leading to their decline as an empire and their forging an alliance with the Federation, which probably ended their territorial expansion. This lead to a period of stagnation in the Empire, leading the people to look backward and make a big deal about their past glories -- so scheming, conniving, bullying modern Klingons now pretend to be just like their ancient warrior ancestors, like a bunch of right wing nationalists in, say, Sweden, might latch on to the identity of the Vikings. I mean, aside from Worf and Martok, no Klingons on any series actually practiced what they preached.



*** Also, how is it that the Klingons, Romulans, and Cardassians are so much stronger than all their neighbors that they're able to dominate them utterly while still being international great powers? In the pre-Federation days as portrayed on ''Enterprise,'' the Vulcans, Andorians, and Tellarites might have hated one another enough so that each would have happily conquered and subjugated the others, but none of them were able to because the others were strong enough to keep them from doing so. So either our corner of the Alpha Quadrant produced many species intelligent enough to become Class II civilizations able to expand to other solar systems, but the other neighborhoods only produced one apiece, which is hardly any more likely than Options 1 and 2. Or else the species on these other planets are intelligent enough to develop advanced societies, but their homeworlds are too resource-poor to allow them to do so. If that's the case, the Klingons, Romulans, and Cardassians are ruling some very economically unimpressive empires. It might not even be worth attempting imperial adventures in these resource-poor planets at all. It would be somewhat comparable to China 110 years ago, when all sorts of imperial powers were biting off spheres of influence, but no one bothered with the resource-poor provinces in the interior like Shaanxi.

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*** Also, how is it that the Klingons, Romulans, and Cardassians are so much stronger than all their neighbors that they're able to dominate them utterly while still being international great powers? In the pre-Federation days as portrayed on ''Enterprise,'' the Vulcans, Andorians, and Tellarites might have hated one another enough so that each would have happily conquered and subjugated the others, but none of them were able to because the others were strong enough to keep them from doing so. So either our corner of the Alpha Quadrant produced many species intelligent enough to become Class II civilizations able to expand to other solar systems, but the other neighborhoods only produced one apiece, which is hardly any more likely than Options 1 and 2. Or else the species on these other planets are intelligent enough to develop advanced societies, but their homeworlds home worlds are too resource-poor to allow them to do so. If that's the case, the Klingons, Romulans, and Cardassians are ruling some very economically unimpressive empires. It might not even be worth attempting imperial adventures in these resource-poor planets at all. It would be somewhat comparable to China 110 years ago, when all sorts of imperial powers were biting off spheres of influence, but no one bothered with the resource-poor provinces in the interior like Shaanxi.



** 'Nother option: the Federation is dozens of times larger than any of the other powers in the Alpha/Beta Quadrants. The Klingons, Romulans and Cardassians aren't actually that much larger than the Ferengi and other one-shot races, but because they have strong military cultures they're vastly overpowered for their size; in contrast, because the Federation has a pacifist culture, Starfleet is vastly ''under''powered for its size. The Federation government is also clearly much looser than the Empires - even the full member worlds aren't really very homogenized, and colonies can go for years without official government contact judging by early [=TNG=] - so it probably doesn't have nearly as high a per-capita budget compared to the tightly-managed states around it. A lot of its military power might even be locked down as individual worlds' planetary defence forces (we know that Vulcan still has an independent one, for instance).

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** 'Nother option: the Federation is dozens of times larger than any of the other powers in the Alpha/Beta Quadrants. The Klingons, Romulans and Cardassians aren't actually that much larger than the Ferengi and other one-shot races, but because they have strong military cultures they're vastly overpowered for their size; in contrast, because the Federation has a pacifist culture, Starfleet is vastly ''under''powered for its size. The Federation government is also clearly much looser than the Empires - even the full member worlds aren't really very homogenized, and colonies can go for years without official government contact judging by early [=TNG=] - so it probably doesn't have nearly as high a per-capita budget compared to the tightly-managed states around it. A lot of its military power might even be locked down as individual worlds' planetary defence defense forces (we know that Vulcan still has an independent one, for instance).



** They're probably not the only power, but certainly the biggest. The Ferrengi aren't conquerors, for example; commerce is definitely a form of cooperation. (YMMV)

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** They're probably not the only power, but certainly the biggest. The Ferrengi Ferengi aren't conquerors, for example; commerce is definitely a form of cooperation. (YMMV)



** The evidence pointing in Duras's direction was that suicide bomb was of a Romulan make. But then, isn't it equally possible that Gowron, having heard the rumours of the House of Duras colluding with Romulans, planted it?
*** That's such a great point that I wonder if the question was left open intentionally. Worf killed Duras, which immediately ended the Rite of Succession, and with Picard's role as arbiter ended, the investigation became an internal Klingon matter. Starfleet's prime directive prevented ''Enterprise'' from interfering in any way, and Gawron could have the issue swept neatly under the rug as chancellor.

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** The evidence pointing in Duras's direction was that suicide bomb was of a Romulan make. But then, isn't it equally possible that Gowron, having heard the rumours rumors of the House of Duras colluding with Romulans, planted it?
*** That's such a great point that I wonder if the question was left open intentionally. Worf killed Duras, which immediately ended the Rite of Succession, and with Picard's role as arbiter ended, the investigation became an internal Klingon matter. Starfleet's prime directive prevented ''Enterprise'' from interfering in any way, and Gawron Gowron could have the issue swept neatly under the rug as chancellor.



* In "Unification" there is subplot that [[spoiler: Romulans have stolen the Vulcan vessel to carry invasion troops]] after [[spoiler: false statement of reunification. Why, if reunification was successful, there would be Vulcan vessels on Romulus?]] I mean Starfleet could just ask Vulcans if they [[spoiler: sent any vessel which would be a bit suspicious if they stated that thay hadn't.]] Also what was the reason of saying Spock that [[spoiler: reunification is false instead of just tricking him to the last moment]] - ok. it was spoiled but see next question? Also what is suspicious in that [[spoiler: Romulan inteligence have top-secret informations even if it is 4 digits? Even if it was the time of meeting of second in command of Romulan Empire? I mean - if there was an important talk with vice-president/vice-prime minister (depending on country) I'm sure security would know every detail]].
** On another note, maybe if the Romulans stopped being such a totalitarian regime, they could spend a lot more resources in planning succesful raids and invasions. You know, instead of trying to screw over and supress their own population. Or executing a XanatosGambit on on of their top admirals to see just how loyal he is. Sure it's useful to find the truly loyal ones and/or get rid of the less loyal ones, but really, it wastes time and makes people paranoid.

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* In "Unification" there is subplot that [[spoiler: Romulans have stolen the Vulcan vessel to carry invasion troops]] after [[spoiler: false statement of reunification. Why, if reunification was successful, there would be Vulcan vessels on Romulus?]] I mean Starfleet could just ask Vulcans if they [[spoiler: sent any vessel which would be a bit suspicious if they stated that thay they hadn't.]] Also what was the reason of saying Spock that [[spoiler: reunification is false instead of just tricking him to the last moment]] - ok. it was spoiled but see next question? Also what is suspicious in that [[spoiler: Romulan inteligence intelligence have top-secret informations even if it is 4 digits? Even if it was the time of meeting of second in command of Romulan Empire? I mean - if there was an important talk with vice-president/vice-prime minister (depending on country) I'm sure security would know every detail]].
** On another note, maybe if the Romulans stopped being such a totalitarian regime, they could spend a lot more resources in planning succesful successful raids and invasions. You know, instead of trying to screw over and supress suppress their own population. Or executing a XanatosGambit on on of their top admirals to see just how loyal he is. Sure it's useful to find the truly loyal ones and/or get rid of the less loyal ones, but really, it wastes time and makes people paranoid.



*** The Borg canonically do ''not'' possess infinitely powerful weapons. Quite the opposite, they got their cubes handed to them by Species 8472, a purely biological species whose capabilities do not even approach those many other higher beings in the Trek universe. There is no evidence that the Borg have ever successfully assaulted or assimilated any race of EnergyBeings, certainly not ones with RealityWarping powers. Indeed, they almost seem to have hit a technological plateau, where they have powerful capabilities, but are unable to impose assimilation on similarly advanced races. The Voth also occupy the Delta Quandrant for example, yet the Borg do not appear to have ever been able to assimilate them.

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*** The Borg canonically do ''not'' possess infinitely powerful weapons. Quite the opposite, they got their cubes handed to them by Species 8472, a purely biological species whose capabilities do not even approach those many other higher beings in the Trek universe. There is no evidence that the Borg have ever successfully assaulted or assimilated any race of EnergyBeings, certainly not ones with RealityWarping powers. Indeed, they almost seem to have hit a technological plateau, where they have powerful capabilities, but are unable to impose assimilation on similarly advanced races. The Voth also occupy the Delta Quandrant Quadrant for example, yet the Borg do not appear to have ever been able to assimilate them.



*** For me it was pretty clear that what Q meant was: Do not provoke the Borg [becasue they can cause a massive massacre and engulf the entire Galaxy destroying all civilizations in it, except us] and not Do not provoke the Borg [because we are afraid of them]. It is clear that the Borg cannot do anything to the Q, but they are the second most powerful life form in the Galaxy. It will be the equivalent of having a garden with all sorts of insects and poking at the anthill of Brazilian fire ants.

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*** For me it was pretty clear that what Q meant was: Do not provoke the Borg [becasue [because they can cause a massive massacre and engulf the entire Galaxy destroying all civilizations in it, except us] and not Do not provoke the Borg [because we are afraid of them]. It is clear that the Borg cannot do anything to the Q, but they are the second most powerful life form in the Galaxy. It will be the equivalent of having a garden with all sorts of insects and poking at the anthill of Brazilian fire ants.



* Keiran [=MacDuff=] has to be the world's worst villain. Nevermind the fact that if the Satarrans had the ability to wipe the memories of the computer and crew (including Data) and insert one of their own among the crew, it makes you wonder why they needed the ''Enterprise'' at all. (Which Riker is kind enough to lampshade for us at the end). But [=MacDuff=] could have given himself any position aboard the ship. Why did he deliberately make himself first officer and not captain?! For that matter, what was stopping him from replacing the entire ''Enterprise'' crew with his fellow Satarrans?
** Because he wouldn't have the first idea of how to *run* the ship. All he had time for prior to the scan was a basic idea of weapon complement and functionality and uploading his dossier into the computer, he would have no idea how the crew operated - which the memory wipe conveniently left behind in the crew. If he had tried to command the ship, Picard and the others would have quickly relieved him of command, attributing his behavior to an acute case of whatever wiped their minds - Captain's incapacitated, who's next on the chain of command? By being first officer, he could suggest and advise Picard, have complete access to the ship, act as liason to the crew under the guise of reducing work for Picard - keeping the big man free to handle the BIG concerns, and delegate any actual job requirements to Riker, who did them anyways. It would give him time to familiarize himself with the crew and starship and, if necessary, incite a mutiny to get what he needed. Basically, he was the power behind the throne.

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* Keiran [=MacDuff=] has to be the world's worst villain. Nevermind Never mind the fact that if the Satarrans had the ability to wipe the memories of the computer and crew (including Data) and insert one of their own among the crew, it makes you wonder why they needed the ''Enterprise'' at all. (Which Riker is kind enough to lampshade for us at the end). But [=MacDuff=] could have given himself any position aboard the ship. Why did he deliberately make himself first officer and not captain?! For that matter, what was stopping him from replacing the entire ''Enterprise'' crew with his fellow Satarrans?
** Because he wouldn't have the first idea of how to *run* the ship. All he had time for prior to the scan was a basic idea of weapon complement and functionality and uploading his dossier into the computer, he would have no idea how the crew operated - which the memory wipe conveniently left behind in the crew. If he had tried to command the ship, Picard and the others would have quickly relieved him of command, attributing his behavior to an acute case of whatever wiped their minds - Captain's incapacitated, who's next on the chain of command? By being first officer, he could suggest and advise Picard, have complete access to the ship, act as liason liaison to the crew under the guise of reducing work for Picard - keeping the big man free to handle the BIG concerns, and delegate any actual job requirements to Riker, who did them anyways. It would give him time to familiarize himself with the crew and starship and, if necessary, incite a mutiny to get what he needed. Basically, he was the power behind the throne.



*** Jonesy probably acts as a mouser on the Nostromo, and besides, it's more like a cat wandering a warehouse than a cat in a crowded office building. I'd just love to see a scene where an Enterprise crewmember is rushing to a key post during a shipwide crisis... only to trip over one of the cats that apparently wander the halls with impunity.

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*** Jonesy probably acts as a mouser on the Nostromo, and besides, it's more like a cat wandering a warehouse than a cat in a crowded office building. I'd just love to see a scene where an Enterprise crewmember crew member is rushing to a key post during a shipwide ship wide crisis... only to trip over one of the cats that apparently wander the halls with impunity.



* How exactly is the Tamarian language supposed to work? Okay, so they express everything through metaphor and historical allusion, and the universal translator can't understand it because it lacks the historical context to parse the allusion. Good so far. Except that they obviously have a syntax capable of expressing things without allusion, because they have words like "and," "at," etc. (Or whatever words or syntax they're using, which the UT is translating only partially, leaving the proper nouns intact.) How do they teach history to children so that the children will understand the allusions, and why don't they speak to Picard in the same way as soon as it becomes clear he's having trouble understanding them? If I said to you, "Hey, we're like Gilgamesh and Enkidu at Uruk," and you gave me a blank look, I'd say, "Oh, they were two enemies who became friends a long time ago." Why can't they do that with Picard? And at the end of the episode, it's decided that "Picard and Dathon at El-Adrel" will be the new "word" in their language for "successful first contact" or something, right? But when that shipful of Tamarians goes home, how do they explain what this new word means to everyone else when everyone else doesn't know what went down? It's frustratingly circular.

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* How exactly is the Tamarian language supposed to work? Okay, so they express everything through metaphor and historical allusion, and the universal translator can't understand it because it lacks the historical context to parse the allusion. Good so far. Except that they obviously have a syntax capable of expressing things without allusion, because they have words like "and," "at," etc. (Or whatever words or syntax they're using, which the UT is translating only partially, leaving the proper nouns intact.) How do they teach history to children so that the children will understand the allusions, and why don't they speak to Picard in the same way as soon as it becomes clear he's having trouble understanding them? If I said to you, "Hey, we're like Gilgamesh and Enkidu at Uruk," and you gave me a blank look, I'd say, "Oh, they were two enemies who became friends a long time ago." Why can't they do that with Picard? And at the end of the episode, it's decided that "Picard and Dathon at El-Adrel" will be the new "word" in their language for "successful first contact" or something, right? But when that shipful shipfull of Tamarians goes home, how do they explain what this new word means to everyone else when everyone else doesn't know what went down? It's frustratingly circular.



** Actually something similar happens in RealLife; the Mapudungun, the language of the Mapuche indians in Chile; its grammar is very alien and one single word can only be translated as entire phrases in English or Spanish, and those phrases can only be an approximate because the language is heavily influenced by the Mapuche lore and mythology. Or take the piraha tribe in Amazonia for example, they have no math, they can’t count more than three, the concept is to foreign for them because they instead of numbers only have words for “many” and “few”. They also have no names for colors, only words for “dark” and “light”, this has make very difficult for them to learn other languages. So the TNG example may be too exaggerated but is clearly not at all implausible, we have similar situations in real life.

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** Actually something similar happens in RealLife; the Mapudungun, the language of the Mapuche indians Indians in Chile; its grammar is very alien and one single word can only be translated as entire phrases in English or Spanish, and those phrases can only be an approximate because the language is heavily influenced by the Mapuche lore and mythology. Or take the piraha tribe in Amazonia for example, they have no math, they can’t count more than three, the concept is to foreign for them because they instead of numbers only have words for “many” and “few”. They also have no names for colors, only words for “dark” and “light”, this has make very difficult for them to learn other languages. So the TNG example may be too exaggerated but is clearly not at all implausible, we have similar situations in real life.



*** Troi wasn't the only one to wear the skirt uniform in "Encounter at Farpoint". In a blink-and-you'll-miss-it bit right at the end of the episode, you'll see Yar at tactical, in one. I can see why she never used it again, wearing a skirt doesn't exactly scream "authorative security chief who will shoot you if you misbehave" does it?

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*** Troi wasn't the only one to wear the skirt uniform in "Encounter at Farpoint". In a blink-and-you'll-miss-it bit right at the end of the episode, you'll see Yar at tactical, in one. I can see why she never used it again, wearing a skirt doesn't exactly scream "authorative "authoritative security chief who will shoot you if you misbehave" does it?



-->NAGILUM [on viewscreen]: I understand. The masculine and the feminine.

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-->NAGILUM [on viewscreen]: view screen]: I understand. The masculine and the feminine.



-->NAGILUM [on viewscreen]: Please, demonstrate how this is accomplished.

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-->NAGILUM [on viewscreen]: view screen]: Please, demonstrate how this is accomplished.



*** I never said anything about the "perfect ones" relying solely on beacons and buoys, anyone with any sense would tell you that's insufficient. I said they should've done everything in their power to warn others to stay away from that planet; have their ambassadors pass that information on to as many people as would listen. At least if someone willfully ignores the warning, then that's on them. Plus,it also would've been better for all concern that they euthanize Armus rather than just leave him lying around at the ass-end of space. Hell, I even got the impression that Armus himself wishes they had just killed him and got it over with.
*** I might be wrong cause I saw the episode long ago, but IIRC there's no indication of how long time passed and judging by the state of the planet (with almost no remains of civilization) I personally was under the impresion that the perfect ones abandoned the planet millions of years in the past, so, again, any warning or diplomatic endevour was lost.

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*** I never said anything about the "perfect ones" relying solely on beacons and buoys, anyone with any sense would tell you that's insufficient. I said they should've done everything in their power to warn others to stay away from that planet; have their ambassadors pass that information on to as many people as would listen. At least if someone willfully ignores the warning, then that's on them. Plus,it Plus, it also would've been better for all concern that they euthanize Armus rather than just leave him lying around at the ass-end of space. Hell, I even got the impression that Armus himself wishes they had just killed him and got it over with.
*** I might be wrong cause I saw the episode long ago, but IIRC there's no indication of how long time passed and judging by the state of the planet (with almost no remains of civilization) I personally was under the impresion impression that the perfect ones abandoned the planet millions of years in the past, so, again, any warning or diplomatic endevour endeavor was lost.



** One supposes that part of being a counselor is sometimes "not insulting your patient", thus yeah, Troi doesn't really need to tell Data "Explore your anger. Oh, but don't snap my neck. Or any crewmembers' necks." Troi knows Data, she knows that even if he's not exactly Three Laws compliant he isn't a cruel or psychotic individual, and will explore the concept of anger in a way that will be as safe as possible for others. All this leaving aside that "Find an outlet for your anger" is something therapists actually do tell their patients, which is basically what Troi's telling Data... it's just that he'll need to find out if he ''can'' feel anger before he finds an outlet for it.

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** One supposes that part of being a counselor is sometimes "not insulting your patient", thus yeah, Troi doesn't really need to tell Data "Explore your anger. Oh, but don't snap my neck. Or any crewmembers' crew members' necks." Troi knows Data, she knows that even if he's not exactly Three Laws compliant he isn't a cruel or psychotic individual, and will explore the concept of anger in a way that will be as safe as possible for others. All this leaving aside that "Find an outlet for your anger" is something therapists actually do tell their patients, which is basically what Troi's telling Data... it's just that he'll need to find out if he ''can'' feel anger before he finds an outlet for it.



* A generation isn’t automatically defined by a thirty years period. You can talk about a generation if you have a group whose members (not necessarily human or living beings) have enough similarities between them and enough dissimilarities with thoses of the prior generation. The baby-boomers are usally identified as people born between 1945 and 1962, this is not a gap of thirty years. “The Next Generation” was the new generation on screen, not in-universe.

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* A generation isn’t automatically defined by a thirty years period. You can talk about a generation if you have a group whose members (not necessarily human or living beings) have enough similarities between them and enough dissimilarities with thoses those of the prior generation. The baby-boomers are usally usually identified as people born between 1945 and 1962, this is not a gap of thirty years. “The Next Generation” was the new generation on screen, not in-universe.



[[folder:Worf's Growing The Beard? Hole-y Viewscreen Walls!]]

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[[folder:Worf's Growing The Beard? Hole-y Viewscreen View screen Walls!]]



** If the front of the Enterprise-D set is just a big hole, how DID they did viewscreen shots, especially ones with a character in them?

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** If the front of the Enterprise-D set is just a big hole, how DID they did viewscreen view screen shots, especially ones with a character in them?



*** When they need the viewscreen in the shot, they wheel in its proscenium and raise a bluescreen (probably greenscreen later) behind it. If there aren't any actors interacting with it, they probably just use a stock matte over the transmission video.

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*** When they need the viewscreen view screen in the shot, they wheel in its proscenium and raise a bluescreen blue screen (probably greenscreen green screen later) behind it. If there aren't any actors interacting with it, they probably just use a stock matte over the transmission video.
20th Oct '17 1:29:35 PM NewVirginiaCreeper
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* What do you suppose became of the Borg under Lore's leadership after they were liberated? Is the Federation under moral obligation to protect them, having liberated them twice over at this point? At the end of "Descent, Part II," the ''Enterprise'' seems to leave them to their own devices. Would the Collective make it a priority to re-assimilate them (they live in close proximity to a transwarp corridor, so one assumes they could do so easily) or would it not bother to expend resources in such a way? Are the "Lorg" actually capable of reproduction -- what are their long-term prospects for survival (especially since they don't have access to space travel any longer, now that their ship has been destroyed)?

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* What do you suppose became of the Borg under Lore's leadership after they were liberated? Is the Federation under moral obligation to protect them, having liberated them twice over at this point? At the end of "Descent, Part II," the ''Enterprise'' seems to leave them to their own devices. Would the Collective make it a priority to re-assimilate them (they live in close proximity to a transwarp corridor, so one assumes they could do so easily) or would it not bother to expend resources in such a way? Are the "Lorg" actually capable of reproduction -- what are their long-term prospects for survival (especially since they don't have access to space travel any longer, now that their ship has been destroyed)?destroyed)? Their planet is 65 light years away (more or less) from Federation research station on Ohniaka III, so it's not massively remote.
20th Oct '17 1:27:22 PM NewVirginiaCreeper
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[[folder:Should we call them "the Lorg?"]]
* What do you suppose became of the Borg under Lore's leadership after they were liberated? Is the Federation under moral obligation to protect them, having liberated them twice over at this point? At the end of "Descent, Part II," the ''Enterprise'' seems to leave them to their own devices. Would the Collective make it a priority to re-assimilate them (they live in close proximity to a transwarp corridor, so one assumes they could do so easily) or would it bother to expend resources in such a way? Are they capable of reproduction -- what are their long-term prospects for survival (especially since they don't have access to space travel any longer, now that their ship has been destroyed)?

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[[folder:Should [[folder:And should we call them "the Lorg?"]]
Lorg?"...]]
* What do you suppose became of the Borg under Lore's leadership after they were liberated? Is the Federation under moral obligation to protect them, having liberated them twice over at this point? At the end of "Descent, Part II," the ''Enterprise'' seems to leave them to their own devices. Would the Collective make it a priority to re-assimilate them (they live in close proximity to a transwarp corridor, so one assumes they could do so easily) or would it not bother to expend resources in such a way? Are they the "Lorg" actually capable of reproduction -- what are their long-term prospects for survival (especially since they don't have access to space travel any longer, now that their ship has been destroyed)?
20th Oct '17 12:48:43 PM NewVirginiaCreeper
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Should we call them "the Lorg?"]]
* What do you suppose became of the Borg under Lore's leadership after they were liberated? Is the Federation under moral obligation to protect them, having liberated them twice over at this point? At the end of "Descent, Part II," the ''Enterprise'' seems to leave them to their own devices. Would the Collective make it a priority to re-assimilate them (they live in close proximity to a transwarp corridor, so one assumes they could do so easily) or would it bother to expend resources in such a way? Are they capable of reproduction -- what are their long-term prospects for survival (especially since they don't have access to space travel any longer, now that their ship has been destroyed)?
[[/folder]]
1st Sep '17 4:21:09 AM HalcyonDayz
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** From what we saw in DS9, wearing the Bajoran earring is not an absolutely necessary part of their religion. It's not like they'll be excommunicated or damned in the eyes of the Prophets if they take them off for long enough to be on duty. However, it's quite possibly part of Worf's culture that he ''will'' be dishonored and unworthy and possibly never get into Sto-vo-Kor if he doesn't wear his sash when he's serving his ship, so they let him wear it. It's the difference between "My religion would reeeeally like it if I wore this" and "My religion says I ''have'' to wear this."

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** From what we saw in DS9, [=DS9=], wearing the Bajoran earring is not an absolutely necessary part of their religion. It's not like they'll be excommunicated or damned in the eyes of the Prophets if they take them off for long enough to be on duty. However, it's quite possibly part of Worf's culture that he ''will'' be dishonored and unworthy and possibly never get into Sto-vo-Kor if he doesn't wear his sash when he's serving his ship, so they let him wear it. It's the difference between "My religion would reeeeally like it if I wore this" and "My religion says I ''have'' to wear this."



*** I believe one of the DS9 crew (either Wolfe or Moore) said that they envisioned the Federation as analogous to the US before the Civil War, but with the individual 'states' (i.e. worlds) having greater autonomy, all managing their own internal affairs and having their own sovereign governments, while the Federation government deals with matters that affect the Federation as a whole, or disputes between member worlds.

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*** I believe one of the DS9 [=DS9=] crew (either Wolfe or Moore) said that they envisioned the Federation as analogous to the US before the Civil War, but with the individual 'states' (i.e. worlds) having greater autonomy, all managing their own internal affairs and having their own sovereign governments, while the Federation government deals with matters that affect the Federation as a whole, or disputes between member worlds.
14th Aug '17 8:29:46 PM thespecialneedsgroup
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** It's not well telegraphed, but I think we're meant to infer that Data believes there's a very good chance that the ''Sutherland'' is about to find herself in ''one hell'' of a firefight. With the rest of the fleet moving away, Data absolutely needs what are simultaneously the ship's primary anti-spacecraft, and primary point defense weapons ready at a moment's notice, or he might not be able to get ''anyone'' out alive. Data's a living calculator, so he's probably run the odds and determined that he's safeguarding more lives than he's endangering by arming phasers. It's also likely that Hobson is using a bit of hyperbole to make his point. He doesn't expect the radiation to literally kill everyone on those decks, but he's understandably appalled at the notion of those crew members getting a huge dose of radiation--which, remember, is still dangerous, but with proper medical care, seems to be pretty treatable in the Trek universe.

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** It's not well telegraphed, but I think we're meant to infer that Data believes there's a very good chance that the ''Sutherland'' is about to find herself in ''one hell'' of a firefight.firefight with the Romulans. With the rest of the fleet moving away, Data absolutely needs what are simultaneously the ship's primary anti-spacecraft, and primary point defense weapons ready at a moment's notice, or he might not be able to get ''anyone'' out alive. Data's a living calculator, so he's probably run the odds and determined that he's safeguarding more lives than he's endangering by arming phasers. It's also likely that Hobson is using a bit of hyperbole to make his point. He doesn't expect the radiation to literally kill everyone on those decks, but he's understandably appalled at the notion of those crew members getting a huge dose of radiation--which, remember, is still dangerous, but with proper medical care, seems to be pretty treatable in the Trek universe.
13th Aug '17 9:34:48 PM thespecialneedsgroup
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** It's not well telegraphed, but I think we're meant to infer that Data believes there's a very good chance that the ''Sutherland'' is about to find herself in ''one hell'' of a firefight. With the rest of the fleet moving away, Data absolutely needs what are simultaneously the ship's primary anti-spacecraft, and primary point defense weapons ready at a moment's notice, or he might not be able to get ''anyone'' out alive. Data's a living calculator, so he's probably run the odds and determined that he's safeguarding more lives that he's endangering by arming phasers. It's also likely that Hobson is using a bit of hyperbole to make his point. He doesn't expect the radiation to literally kill everyone on those decks, but he's understandably appalled at the notion of those crew members getting a huge dose of radiation--which, remember, is still dangerous, but with proper medical care, seems to be pretty treatable in the Trek universe.

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** It's not well telegraphed, but I think we're meant to infer that Data believes there's a very good chance that the ''Sutherland'' is about to find herself in ''one hell'' of a firefight. With the rest of the fleet moving away, Data absolutely needs what are simultaneously the ship's primary anti-spacecraft, and primary point defense weapons ready at a moment's notice, or he might not be able to get ''anyone'' out alive. Data's a living calculator, so he's probably run the odds and determined that he's safeguarding more lives that than he's endangering by arming phasers. It's also likely that Hobson is using a bit of hyperbole to make his point. He doesn't expect the radiation to literally kill everyone on those decks, but he's understandably appalled at the notion of those crew members getting a huge dose of radiation--which, remember, is still dangerous, but with proper medical care, seems to be pretty treatable in the Trek universe.
13th Aug '17 6:19:51 AM thespecialneedsgroup
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*** I could never watch a StarTrekShake on The Next Generation without thinking about the how the children on board being horribly traumatized by having their home violently buffeted at least once a week. Imagine what the ship's parents and teachers have to deal with every time the red alert klaxon sounds.

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*** I could never watch a StarTrekShake on The Next Generation without thinking about the how the children on board are being horribly traumatized by having their home violently buffeted at least once a week. Imagine what the ship's parents and teachers have to deal with every time the red alert klaxon sounds.


Added DiffLines:

** It's not well telegraphed, but I think we're meant to infer that Data believes there's a very good chance that the ''Sutherland'' is about to find herself in ''one hell'' of a firefight. With the rest of the fleet moving away, Data absolutely needs what are simultaneously the ship's primary anti-spacecraft, and primary point defense weapons ready at a moment's notice, or he might not be able to get ''anyone'' out alive. Data's a living calculator, so he's probably run the odds and determined that he's safeguarding more lives that he's endangering by arming phasers. It's also likely that Hobson is using a bit of hyperbole to make his point. He doesn't expect the radiation to literally kill everyone on those decks, but he's understandably appalled at the notion of those crew members getting a huge dose of radiation--which, remember, is still dangerous, but with proper medical care, seems to be pretty treatable in the Trek universe.
13th Aug '17 3:39:22 AM thatsnumberwang
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Added DiffLines:

** We see in Counselor Troi's bridge exam that part of being a commanding officer in Starfleet is the right to sacrifice crewmen for the greater good. If that was deemed to be the case here, then not only would Data be fine, but in Starfleet's eyes, Hobson was in the wrong. I agree that it should have been mentioned though and honestly it seems to me something that may have been added as an afterthought given how irrelevant it is.
12th Aug '17 6:32:51 PM Softy
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder: Radiation on the Sutherland]]
* In "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS4E26S5E1Redemption Redemption]]" Data orders the Sutherland's phasers to be brought on-line. His first officer, Hobson, objects that this will flood three decks with radiation and accuses Data throwing people's lives away. The rest of the episode makes no mention of people having died. It seems to me that if they had, Data himself would have said it when submitting himself for disciplinary action later, but he instead focuses on his having broken orders from Picard. I remember being confused by this plot point when first watching this episode as a child, and it was just as confusing on re-watch recently. So, what's the deal here? Did Data actually kill people in this episode? It seems to me that whether he did or didn't significantly changes both the morality of his actions and the justification of Hobson's objections. And why didn't the episode bother specifying either way? Was it just bad writing, something carelessly dropped during editing, or was it left ambiguous on purpose?
[[/folder]]
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