History Headscratchers / StarTrekTheNextGeneration

20th Oct '17 1:29:35 PM NewVirginiaCreeper
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* What do you suppose became of the Borg under Lore's leadership after they were liberated? Is the Federation under moral obligation to protect them, having liberated them twice over at this point? At the end of "Descent, Part II," the ''Enterprise'' seems to leave them to their own devices. Would the Collective make it a priority to re-assimilate them (they live in close proximity to a transwarp corridor, so one assumes they could do so easily) or would it not bother to expend resources in such a way? Are the "Lorg" actually capable of reproduction -- what are their long-term prospects for survival (especially since they don't have access to space travel any longer, now that their ship has been destroyed)?

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* What do you suppose became of the Borg under Lore's leadership after they were liberated? Is the Federation under moral obligation to protect them, having liberated them twice over at this point? At the end of "Descent, Part II," the ''Enterprise'' seems to leave them to their own devices. Would the Collective make it a priority to re-assimilate them (they live in close proximity to a transwarp corridor, so one assumes they could do so easily) or would it not bother to expend resources in such a way? Are the "Lorg" actually capable of reproduction -- what are their long-term prospects for survival (especially since they don't have access to space travel any longer, now that their ship has been destroyed)?destroyed)? Their planet is 65 light years away (more or less) from Federation research station on Ohniaka III, so it's not massively remote.
20th Oct '17 1:27:22 PM NewVirginiaCreeper
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[[folder:Should we call them "the Lorg?"]]
* What do you suppose became of the Borg under Lore's leadership after they were liberated? Is the Federation under moral obligation to protect them, having liberated them twice over at this point? At the end of "Descent, Part II," the ''Enterprise'' seems to leave them to their own devices. Would the Collective make it a priority to re-assimilate them (they live in close proximity to a transwarp corridor, so one assumes they could do so easily) or would it bother to expend resources in such a way? Are they capable of reproduction -- what are their long-term prospects for survival (especially since they don't have access to space travel any longer, now that their ship has been destroyed)?

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[[folder:Should [[folder:And should we call them "the Lorg?"]]
Lorg?"...]]
* What do you suppose became of the Borg under Lore's leadership after they were liberated? Is the Federation under moral obligation to protect them, having liberated them twice over at this point? At the end of "Descent, Part II," the ''Enterprise'' seems to leave them to their own devices. Would the Collective make it a priority to re-assimilate them (they live in close proximity to a transwarp corridor, so one assumes they could do so easily) or would it not bother to expend resources in such a way? Are they the "Lorg" actually capable of reproduction -- what are their long-term prospects for survival (especially since they don't have access to space travel any longer, now that their ship has been destroyed)?
20th Oct '17 12:48:43 PM NewVirginiaCreeper
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[[folder:Should we call them "the Lorg?"]]
* What do you suppose became of the Borg under Lore's leadership after they were liberated? Is the Federation under moral obligation to protect them, having liberated them twice over at this point? At the end of "Descent, Part II," the ''Enterprise'' seems to leave them to their own devices. Would the Collective make it a priority to re-assimilate them (they live in close proximity to a transwarp corridor, so one assumes they could do so easily) or would it bother to expend resources in such a way? Are they capable of reproduction -- what are their long-term prospects for survival (especially since they don't have access to space travel any longer, now that their ship has been destroyed)?
[[/folder]]
1st Sep '17 4:21:09 AM HalcyonDayz
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** From what we saw in DS9, wearing the Bajoran earring is not an absolutely necessary part of their religion. It's not like they'll be excommunicated or damned in the eyes of the Prophets if they take them off for long enough to be on duty. However, it's quite possibly part of Worf's culture that he ''will'' be dishonored and unworthy and possibly never get into Sto-vo-Kor if he doesn't wear his sash when he's serving his ship, so they let him wear it. It's the difference between "My religion would reeeeally like it if I wore this" and "My religion says I ''have'' to wear this."

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** From what we saw in DS9, [=DS9=], wearing the Bajoran earring is not an absolutely necessary part of their religion. It's not like they'll be excommunicated or damned in the eyes of the Prophets if they take them off for long enough to be on duty. However, it's quite possibly part of Worf's culture that he ''will'' be dishonored and unworthy and possibly never get into Sto-vo-Kor if he doesn't wear his sash when he's serving his ship, so they let him wear it. It's the difference between "My religion would reeeeally like it if I wore this" and "My religion says I ''have'' to wear this."



*** I believe one of the DS9 crew (either Wolfe or Moore) said that they envisioned the Federation as analogous to the US before the Civil War, but with the individual 'states' (i.e. worlds) having greater autonomy, all managing their own internal affairs and having their own sovereign governments, while the Federation government deals with matters that affect the Federation as a whole, or disputes between member worlds.

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*** I believe one of the DS9 [=DS9=] crew (either Wolfe or Moore) said that they envisioned the Federation as analogous to the US before the Civil War, but with the individual 'states' (i.e. worlds) having greater autonomy, all managing their own internal affairs and having their own sovereign governments, while the Federation government deals with matters that affect the Federation as a whole, or disputes between member worlds.
14th Aug '17 8:29:46 PM thespecialneedsgroup
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** It's not well telegraphed, but I think we're meant to infer that Data believes there's a very good chance that the ''Sutherland'' is about to find herself in ''one hell'' of a firefight. With the rest of the fleet moving away, Data absolutely needs what are simultaneously the ship's primary anti-spacecraft, and primary point defense weapons ready at a moment's notice, or he might not be able to get ''anyone'' out alive. Data's a living calculator, so he's probably run the odds and determined that he's safeguarding more lives than he's endangering by arming phasers. It's also likely that Hobson is using a bit of hyperbole to make his point. He doesn't expect the radiation to literally kill everyone on those decks, but he's understandably appalled at the notion of those crew members getting a huge dose of radiation--which, remember, is still dangerous, but with proper medical care, seems to be pretty treatable in the Trek universe.

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** It's not well telegraphed, but I think we're meant to infer that Data believes there's a very good chance that the ''Sutherland'' is about to find herself in ''one hell'' of a firefight.firefight with the Romulans. With the rest of the fleet moving away, Data absolutely needs what are simultaneously the ship's primary anti-spacecraft, and primary point defense weapons ready at a moment's notice, or he might not be able to get ''anyone'' out alive. Data's a living calculator, so he's probably run the odds and determined that he's safeguarding more lives than he's endangering by arming phasers. It's also likely that Hobson is using a bit of hyperbole to make his point. He doesn't expect the radiation to literally kill everyone on those decks, but he's understandably appalled at the notion of those crew members getting a huge dose of radiation--which, remember, is still dangerous, but with proper medical care, seems to be pretty treatable in the Trek universe.
13th Aug '17 9:34:48 PM thespecialneedsgroup
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** It's not well telegraphed, but I think we're meant to infer that Data believes there's a very good chance that the ''Sutherland'' is about to find herself in ''one hell'' of a firefight. With the rest of the fleet moving away, Data absolutely needs what are simultaneously the ship's primary anti-spacecraft, and primary point defense weapons ready at a moment's notice, or he might not be able to get ''anyone'' out alive. Data's a living calculator, so he's probably run the odds and determined that he's safeguarding more lives that he's endangering by arming phasers. It's also likely that Hobson is using a bit of hyperbole to make his point. He doesn't expect the radiation to literally kill everyone on those decks, but he's understandably appalled at the notion of those crew members getting a huge dose of radiation--which, remember, is still dangerous, but with proper medical care, seems to be pretty treatable in the Trek universe.

to:

** It's not well telegraphed, but I think we're meant to infer that Data believes there's a very good chance that the ''Sutherland'' is about to find herself in ''one hell'' of a firefight. With the rest of the fleet moving away, Data absolutely needs what are simultaneously the ship's primary anti-spacecraft, and primary point defense weapons ready at a moment's notice, or he might not be able to get ''anyone'' out alive. Data's a living calculator, so he's probably run the odds and determined that he's safeguarding more lives that than he's endangering by arming phasers. It's also likely that Hobson is using a bit of hyperbole to make his point. He doesn't expect the radiation to literally kill everyone on those decks, but he's understandably appalled at the notion of those crew members getting a huge dose of radiation--which, remember, is still dangerous, but with proper medical care, seems to be pretty treatable in the Trek universe.
13th Aug '17 6:19:51 AM thespecialneedsgroup
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*** I could never watch a StarTrekShake on The Next Generation without thinking about the how the children on board being horribly traumatized by having their home violently buffeted at least once a week. Imagine what the ship's parents and teachers have to deal with every time the red alert klaxon sounds.

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*** I could never watch a StarTrekShake on The Next Generation without thinking about the how the children on board are being horribly traumatized by having their home violently buffeted at least once a week. Imagine what the ship's parents and teachers have to deal with every time the red alert klaxon sounds.


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** It's not well telegraphed, but I think we're meant to infer that Data believes there's a very good chance that the ''Sutherland'' is about to find herself in ''one hell'' of a firefight. With the rest of the fleet moving away, Data absolutely needs what are simultaneously the ship's primary anti-spacecraft, and primary point defense weapons ready at a moment's notice, or he might not be able to get ''anyone'' out alive. Data's a living calculator, so he's probably run the odds and determined that he's safeguarding more lives that he's endangering by arming phasers. It's also likely that Hobson is using a bit of hyperbole to make his point. He doesn't expect the radiation to literally kill everyone on those decks, but he's understandably appalled at the notion of those crew members getting a huge dose of radiation--which, remember, is still dangerous, but with proper medical care, seems to be pretty treatable in the Trek universe.
13th Aug '17 3:39:22 AM thatsnumberwang
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** We see in Counselor Troi's bridge exam that part of being a commanding officer in Starfleet is the right to sacrifice crewmen for the greater good. If that was deemed to be the case here, then not only would Data be fine, but in Starfleet's eyes, Hobson was in the wrong. I agree that it should have been mentioned though and honestly it seems to me something that may have been added as an afterthought given how irrelevant it is.
12th Aug '17 6:32:51 PM Softy
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[[folder: Radiation on the Sutherland]]
* In "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS4E26S5E1Redemption Redemption]]" Data orders the Sutherland's phasers to be brought on-line. His first officer, Hobson, objects that this will flood three decks with radiation and accuses Data throwing people's lives away. The rest of the episode makes no mention of people having died. It seems to me that if they had, Data himself would have said it when submitting himself for disciplinary action later, but he instead focuses on his having broken orders from Picard. I remember being confused by this plot point when first watching this episode as a child, and it was just as confusing on re-watch recently. So, what's the deal here? Did Data actually kill people in this episode? It seems to me that whether he did or didn't significantly changes both the morality of his actions and the justification of Hobson's objections. And why didn't the episode bother specifying either way? Was it just bad writing, something carelessly dropped during editing, or was it left ambiguous on purpose?
[[/folder]]
7th Aug '17 6:56:20 AM thespecialneedsgroup
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*** Incidentally, it's implied in TNG: "Genesis," and confirmed in [=DS9=]: "Doctor Bashir, I Presume" that genetic engineering ''is'' allowed in the Federation to treat genetic diseases and defects. Presumably, that means using it to stabilize or correct the Mariposan's genetic drift would be legal.
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