History Headscratchers / StarTrekTheNextGeneration

6th Dec '16 6:59:41 PM RavenWilder
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* The Enterprise computer is absolutely capable of passing the Turing Test, of behaving in a way indistinguishable from that of a human being . . . ''if'' someone has instructed it to do so. Left to its own devices, it has shown no indication of having independent desires or emotions, of wanting to do anything other than precisely what it's told. Given that, the holodeck programs should perhaps be viewed as an actor playing a role: you put on a costume and pretend to be a character, and if you're good enough at it, people will be convinced that the character is a real person, even though it's just an artifice you've constructed and doesn't reflect your real thoughts and feelings. The computer ''might'' be conscious or sentient, depending on how you define those terms, but it doesn't have a ''human-like'' consciousness, has never chosen to express itself in a way that humans would recognize as free will. Any time it's appeared to do so has been a performance, done for the crew's benefit and at the crew's request.
5th Dec '16 7:52:17 AM LordInsane
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* On the other hand both Ro in ''Ensign Ro'' and Gerren, Chell and Henley in ''Learning Curve'' were seen as troublemakers or worse, and Troi wearing the leotards was apparently in line with something of a ''tradition'' of permissability for officers in specialised positions non-specific to Picard, suggesting that Starfleet might actually generally be fairly relaxed with its uniform code (after all, while they very, very rarely were actually seen the Federation does include some members that would have problems ''physically'' complying with the code) -- when Worf meets Jellico he has years of service as an able, for the most part loyal officer. Ro and Gerren... don't (and you'll notice that once she ''has'' proved herself as having potential over the course of ''Ensign Ro'', Picard does agree to let her wear the earring). There's also that Worf's duties more than once involved interacting with Klingons, for which the baldric served as a useful visual marker that despite the Starfleet uniform Worf still remembers his Klingon heritage.
4th Dec '16 12:05:43 PM NewVirginiaCreeper
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** Maybe she becomes the perfect "fag hag."
4th Dec '16 9:02:54 AM WildeOscar
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[[folder: Another Gender Issue]]
* In "The Perfect Mate", if Kamala becomes the fulfillment of the fantasy of any man she's around, what happens if she's in the company of a gay guy, does she turn into a man?
[[/folder]]
3rd Dec '16 3:25:22 PM thatsnumberwang
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*** The mistake here if there is one is the wardrobe department's limited colouring scheme. Science/medical blue is a reasonable one to group together perhaps, but command/operations? security/engineering? These are completely separate fields. A fourth or even fifth colour or shade is desperately needed here. The red uniform featured in films 2 through 7 due to having markedly different insignia and palette depending on department is currently the only uniform that would make any real world sense.
2nd Dec '16 5:06:10 AM mcb359
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**** Travis didn't wear operations gold. He wore command gold, as was customary during the ENT/TOS time, so it was correct for his era.
20th Nov '16 12:26:02 PM inspibrain101
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*** I like the potential that different Ferengi have different death rituals; it turns them from the profit-at-any-cost-and-we-hate-our-women monoculture that they would develop over on Deep Space Nine into a race with layers. {{Flanderization}} is unfortunately Trek's biggest weakness.

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*** I like the potential that different Ferengi have different death rituals; it turns them from the profit-at-any-cost-and-we-hate-our-women monoculture that they would develop over on Deep Space Nine into a race with layers. {{Flanderization}} is unfortunately Trek's Trek's
biggest weakness.weakness.
** No, actually, it makes sense that an autopsy would upset the Ferengi; it means potentially less flesh to chop off and sell as souvenirs. Maximize the profit!
20th Nov '16 12:24:23 PM inspibrain101
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* There really needs to be a trope about this! I've seen this in a handful of other shows, (Lost and Once Upon A Time come to mind), where everything bad and dramatic happens to the main cast, and the main cast is upset about that, but when ten people are eaten by the Monster of the Week... crickets. Especially when the main cast is supposed to be a part of a much larger group.
17th Nov '16 4:34:43 PM NewVirginiaCreeper
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** Data has an ethical subroutine that he likens to a conscience. Clearly, Data does not find it within the "conscience" to shot his cat even if it is something that would do no lasting damage.

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** Data has an ethical subroutine that he likens to a conscience. Clearly, Data does not find it within the his "conscience" to shot his cat even if it is something that would do no lasting damage.
16th Nov '16 2:17:56 AM darkling183
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* This horse has probably been beaten to death, but I didn't see it here, so here it goes: The ''U.S.S. Pasteur'' fires a tachyon pulse to scan for the anti-time anomaly, and is destroyed by the Klingons shortly thereafter. The crew is rescued by the ''Enterprise'' and, when they return later, discover that the anomaly has formed and is based on the convergence of tachyon pulses from ''3'' different versions of the ''Enterprise.'' How is that possible when the ''Enterprise'' in the future timeline never fired a tachyon pulse of it's own?

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* This horse has probably been beaten to death, but I didn't see it here, so here it goes: The ''U.S.S. Pasteur'' fires a tachyon pulse to scan for the anti-time anomaly, and is destroyed by the Klingons shortly thereafter. The crew is rescued by the ''Enterprise'' and, when they return later, discover that the anomaly has formed and is based on the convergence of tachyon pulses from ''3'' different versions of the ''Enterprise.'' How is that possible when the ''Enterprise'' in the future timeline never fired a tachyon pulse of it's its own?


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** In an early version of the script for 'All Good Things', the future ''Enterprise'' was in a museum. Picard and his former crew stole it and took it to the anomaly. Executive producer Michael Piller rejected that idea, and either the writers never noticed the issue this caused with the tachyon pulse, or it was too late to find a way to fix the problem.
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