History Headscratchers / SherlockHolmes

13th Jun '17 5:24:29 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Because ''Holmes himself'' considers her an equal (or near enough). The story itself begins with Watson waxing lyrical about how Holmes respects her enough to consider her above any other woman of his acquaintance, it ends with Watson describing how Holmes acquires and prominently displays a memento of her to remind him of their encounter, and in general the story is presented in such a way as to leave little doubt that Holmes has developed a regard for Adler that, if not exactly considering her an equal, at very least suggests that he clearly feels that she's very close to being an equal by his standards. In short, it's not hard for readers to view Adler as being an equal to Holmes (or close enough at least) when the protagonist of the stories himself clearly gives the impression of viewing her that way.
13th Jun '17 4:58:13 AM DoctorNemesis
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** The guy ''had'' just had his head beaten in and was literally experiencing his last moments of life. That sort of thing is presumably quite disorientating. We can perhaps excuse him under the circumstances for not quite having the mental wherewithal to make his last message crystal clear or to pick the best possible words to identify his murderer with laser-sharp accuracy.

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** The guy ''had'' just had his head beaten bashed in and was literally experiencing his last moments of life. That sort of thing is presumably quite disorientating. We can perhaps excuse him under the circumstances for not quite having the mental wherewithal to make his last message crystal clear or to pick the best possible words to identify his murderer with laser-sharp accuracy.
18th Feb '17 8:03:15 AM DoctorNemesis
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* Just because Professor Moriarty is a murderous criminal mastermind doesn't mean his brother is as well. Colonel Moriarty might want to defend his brother's name and reputation, even if merely out of family loyalty or for his own self-interest, but it doesn't necessarily follow that he's also willing to go so far as to engage in a blood feud with Sherlock Holmes over it, especially if it means collaborating with a dishonoured soldier and criminal who may have narrowly wriggled out of a hanging to do so.
30th Jan '17 6:20:46 PM MadAnthony94
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* For all we know, the Colonel cared little for his brother, his recriminations at the aspersions placed on the Prof's good name were token, half-hearted, or outright nonexistent, and Watson was merely being sarcastic when he mentioned it.
30th Jan '17 6:16:30 PM MadAnthony94
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Added DiffLines:

*** Kim Newman proposes a similar setup sans impersonation, with Colonel, Professor, and Stationmaster in that order. He also goes into depth with Pater James' illness; he flat-out refuses to even acknowledge his previous son's existence with each successive one being born, pretending each new son is an only child worthy of the name.
7th Jan '17 2:17:53 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Mr. Rucastle is an affluent and seemingly respectable gentleman who is, in his words, looking for a young woman with "the bearing and deportment of a lady". Part of this would be taking a close attention to their appearance, and while his behaviour and some of his requirements are perhaps a bit eccentric, on the surface Miss Stoper doesn't have any real reason to suspect or accuse him of anything unproper. Furthermore, while she might run a well-known agency, no one ever said that Miss Stoper was the most ''ethical'' of employers. Mr. Rucastle is willing to pay a governess a ''very'' generous wage to work for him, and Miss Hunter makes a point of stating that she strongly suspects that part of the reason Miss Stoper gets so stroppy with her when she initially refuses the job is because Miss Stoper herself is losing a very generous commission if she doesn't find someone for Mr. Rucastle. In other words, Mr. Rucastle is using the time-honoured strategy of silencing any qualms Miss Stoper might have with a generous bribe.

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** Mr. Rucastle is an affluent and seemingly respectable gentleman who is, in his words, looking for a young woman with "the bearing and deportment of a lady". Part of this would be taking a close attention to their appearance, and while his behaviour and some of his requirements are perhaps a bit eccentric, on the surface Miss Stoper doesn't have any real reason to suspect or accuse him of anything unproper. Furthermore, while she might run a well-known agency, agency (and to quibble, no one ever says that it's the ''best'' agency or that Miss Stoper is the best employer, just that the agency she runs has a good reputation), no one ever said that Miss Stoper was the most ''ethical'' of employers. Mr. Rucastle is willing to pay a governess a ''very'' generous wage to work for him, and Miss Hunter makes a point of stating that she strongly suspects that part of the reason Miss Stoper gets so stroppy with her when she initially refuses the job is because Miss Stoper herself is losing a very generous commission if she doesn't find someone for Mr. Rucastle. In other words, Mr. Rucastle is using the time-honoured strategy of silencing any qualms Miss Stoper might have with a generous bribe.
7th Jan '17 2:16:09 AM DoctorNemesis
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to:

** Mr. Rucastle is an affluent and seemingly respectable gentleman who is, in his words, looking for a young woman with "the bearing and deportment of a lady". Part of this would be taking a close attention to their appearance, and while his behaviour and some of his requirements are perhaps a bit eccentric, on the surface Miss Stoper doesn't have any real reason to suspect or accuse him of anything unproper. Furthermore, while she might run a well-known agency, no one ever said that Miss Stoper was the most ''ethical'' of employers. Mr. Rucastle is willing to pay a governess a ''very'' generous wage to work for him, and Miss Hunter makes a point of stating that she strongly suspects that part of the reason Miss Stoper gets so stroppy with her when she initially refuses the job is because Miss Stoper herself is losing a very generous commission if she doesn't find someone for Mr. Rucastle. In other words, Mr. Rucastle is using the time-honoured strategy of silencing any qualms Miss Stoper might have with a generous bribe.
29th Dec '16 11:49:06 AM rememberthehood1941
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* Why doesn't Miss Stoper at the beginning of the story get more suspicious about Rucastle's behavior around the prospective governesses and his attentions on Violent Hunter? Governesses back then were in a particularly vulnerable position and were often governesses because they really didn't have any other recourse and were in danger of being taken advantage of by the older men in the household (including the master of the house). If something bad happened, she wouldn't have just lost her job but her reputation [[ValuesDissonance (which was considered even worse)]] and basically be blackballed. As the top employer of governesses, Miss Stoper would've not only been aware of this but of the damage to her business because everyone would've known she was the one who recommended Violet. So why doesn't she get more suspicious and why did she scold Violet for turning down a good job when it was clear this guy was looking at their appearances?
4th Dec '16 10:27:20 PM DoctorNemesis
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** The guy ''had'' just had his head beaten in and was literally on his last breath. We can perhaps excuse him under the circumstances for not quite having the mental wherewithal to make his last message crystal clear enough to pinpoint his murderer with undeniable accuracy.

to:

** The guy ''had'' just had his head beaten in and was literally on experiencing his last breath. moments of life. That sort of thing is presumably quite disorientating. We can perhaps excuse him under the circumstances for not quite having the mental wherewithal to make his last message crystal clear enough or to pinpoint pick the best possible words to identify his murderer with undeniable laser-sharp accuracy.
3rd Dec '16 6:57:11 AM DoctorNemesis
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to:

** The guy ''had'' just had his head beaten in and was literally on his last breath. We can perhaps excuse him under the circumstances for not quite having the mental wherewithal to make his last message crystal clear enough to pinpoint his murderer with undeniable accuracy.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Headscratchers.SherlockHolmes