History Headscratchers / SherlockHolmes

24th Aug '16 6:50:30 AM Killztwice
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** Personally I imagine part of it has to do with ValuesDissonance; trying to get Sherlock to come off to modern audiences as he would have come off to contemporary audiences. Given that most modern sensibilities wholeheartedly reject the social norms and rules of Victorian society, Holmes would probably come off as far too sympathetic to modern audiences if he were just an eccentric who didn't fit in with those norms, where as Victorians might have found his behavior more shocking. By making him and out and out asshole, he comes off to modern viewers as he would have to readers of his time, to show that it's not as simple as the rigid, snobbish high society culture rejecting an odd duck.
26th Jun '16 7:47:04 PM nombretomado
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*** And for all we know, [[Series/DoctorWho The Doctor]] and [[TheDresdenFiles Harry Dresden]] showed up and whisked her away to [[TheChroniclesOfNarnia Narnia]] to rest up a bit. Imprisoning someone like Irene (already a tricky proposition for someone who's essentially Catwoman) on the off chance she might be used for bargaining purposes later (after already telling Holmes she was dead) is illogical, and if Moriarty were going to do it there were plenty of good times for him to drop that bombshell. Again, while it's theoretically possible she's alive and will pop up in a later sequel, it would frankly be a little silly. Until she shows up again alive, it's most logical and reasonable to assume she's dead.

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*** And for all we know, [[Series/DoctorWho The Doctor]] and [[TheDresdenFiles [[Literature/TheDresdenFiles Harry Dresden]] showed up and whisked her away to [[TheChroniclesOfNarnia [[Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia Narnia]] to rest up a bit. Imprisoning someone like Irene (already a tricky proposition for someone who's essentially Catwoman) on the off chance she might be used for bargaining purposes later (after already telling Holmes she was dead) is illogical, and if Moriarty were going to do it there were plenty of good times for him to drop that bombshell. Again, while it's theoretically possible she's alive and will pop up in a later sequel, it would frankly be a little silly. Until she shows up again alive, it's most logical and reasonable to assume she's dead.
16th Jun '16 7:40:47 PM gman992
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** The original Holmes thought that people who weren't his intellectual equal beneath him. He thought that they were crude and illogical. If you read very carefully through the original stories, he treats Watson, and to some extant Mrs. Hudson, like how someone would treat a servant. Watson and Hudson actually humanize Holmes. Also, he's British. All that stiff upper lip and everything.

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** The original Holmes thought that people who weren't his intellectual equal beneath him. He thought that they were crude and illogical. If you read very carefully through the original stories, he treats Watson, and to some extant Mrs. Hudson, like how someone would treat a servant. Watson and Hudson actually humanize Holmes. Just read how he treats women. Now, he doesn't hate women. He just doesn't understand him as opposed, to say Watson, whose been married 3 or 4 times. How can you work or "deal" with people whose moods changes as the wind? Read "A Scandal in Bohemia" or "The Mystery of the Second Stain." Also, he's British. All that stiff upper lip and everything.
16th Jun '16 7:36:07 PM gman992
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** The original Holmes thought that people who weren't his intellectual equal beneath him. He thought that they were crude and illogical. If you read very carefully through the original stories, he treats Watson, and to some extant Mrs. Hudson, like how someone would treat a servant. Watson and Hudson actually humanize Holmes. Also, he's British. All that stiff upper lip and everything.
16th Jun '16 7:31:02 PM gman992
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** Back then, the notion that two lifelong male bachelors (or friends) living together to a ripe old age wouldn't even draw attention. The notion that two men living together to a ripe old age being gay wasn't even a problem until the sexual revolution started where everyone started to see sex everywhere and in everything. The only caveat back then that something "fishy" was going on would be to see an older man living with a younger man who wasn't his son or couldn't pay his own way. That's how the Cleveland Street scandal started. Clearly, Holmes being a consulting detective and Watson having his own medical practice would not draw suspicion. Remember, this was still late 19th Century England where people and families still lived in the same house for generations just to save money.
19th Apr '16 8:51:04 AM DoctorNemesis
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** If it wasn't raining, they would have found some other way to douse Standish in flammable liquid, and probably would have had a back-up in play somehow. It's not like Blackwood isn't already playing a long-game here, he probably has some kind of contingencies set up.
17th Jan '16 6:00:44 AM DoctorNemesis
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*** Plus, let's face it, it's not as if every single criminal and would-be criminal in London is going to go out and buy and read every issue of the Strand to study up on the off-chance that they end up having to do a battle of wits with Sherlock Holmes. There's plenty of crime, criminals and intriguing mysteries out there for Sherlock Holmes to deal with.
10th Nov '15 11:25:16 AM Sharlee
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* Or possibly we're giving Hope too little credit. His "cabbie" persona had been sufficient to fool the very man he'd been pursuing across most of Europe, and he has no way of knowing that Holmes already knows his name or that the cab-driver did the crime. He may have thought that some passerby had reported his cab in the area on the fatal night, and that at worst, Holmes wanted to interview its driver as a potential ''witness'', not culprit. In which case, he might be able to find out what happened to the real ring, and throw his pursuers onto yet another false trail, by playing along.
1st Nov '15 10:44:35 AM nombretomado
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* Blackwood's plan to take over Britain can't work. Even if he wipes out all of Parliament except the men loyal to him, it can't work. [[QueenVicky Queen Victoria]] would hold the power to appoint the new Prime Minister, and while it would be traditional to pick whoever the majority of Parliament picks for the job, it's not a legal requirement and I doubt very much if she would do so if he only had a majority because he killed everyone who opposed him. Furthermore, if she wanted, she could simply issue a royal writ calling a new election, which would automatically cause Parliament to dissolve (that law wasn't changed until 2011). The police and military forces, meanwhile, are loyal to the monarch as Head of State, and wouldn't answer to the Home Secretary if his orders contradicted theirs. Any way you slice it, killing Parliament wouldn't actually accomplish anything, beyond publicly identifying the survivors as Blackwood's co-conspirators.

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* Blackwood's plan to take over Britain can't work. Even if he wipes out all of Parliament except the men loyal to him, it can't work. [[QueenVicky Queen Victoria]] UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria would hold the power to appoint the new Prime Minister, and while it would be traditional to pick whoever the majority of Parliament picks for the job, it's not a legal requirement and I doubt very much if she would do so if he only had a majority because he killed everyone who opposed him. Furthermore, if she wanted, she could simply issue a royal writ calling a new election, which would automatically cause Parliament to dissolve (that law wasn't changed until 2011). The police and military forces, meanwhile, are loyal to the monarch as Head of State, and wouldn't answer to the Home Secretary if his orders contradicted theirs. Any way you slice it, killing Parliament wouldn't actually accomplish anything, beyond publicly identifying the survivors as Blackwood's co-conspirators.
16th Oct '15 4:13:08 PM nombretomado
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*** ... A worthy enigma, [[PinkyAndTheBrain Pinky]]. Although a sword would presumably be a lot more conspicuous than a concealed firearm, and I'm pretty sure that even in the nineteenth century the British police didn't exactly look kindly on people walking around with bloody great swords; plus, swords seem a bit more... European than guns. I dunno what the likelihood of the American ambassador owning a sword over a gun would be, but presumably Blackwood worked on that assumption.

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*** ... A worthy enigma, [[PinkyAndTheBrain [[WesternAnimation/PinkyAndTheBrain Pinky]]. Although a sword would presumably be a lot more conspicuous than a concealed firearm, and I'm pretty sure that even in the nineteenth century the British police didn't exactly look kindly on people walking around with bloody great swords; plus, swords seem a bit more... European than guns. I dunno what the likelihood of the American ambassador owning a sword over a gun would be, but presumably Blackwood worked on that assumption.
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