History Headscratchers / Rent

14th Feb '18 12:33:52 AM loudmouthgeek
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* Why did Roger begin the song "Light My Candle" with the words "What did you forget?" You can see it [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=urfB-_iX-gE here]] as the movie version, but it also happens in the original Broadway recording. Clearly, in the movie he can't have mistaken Mimi for Mark, who had just left, and as Mimi has to tell Roger her name at the end of the song she can't actually have left anything there. Seems small, but I mulled that over the rest of the entire movie.

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* Why did Roger begin the song "Light My Candle" with the words "What did you forget?" You can see it [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=urfB-_iX-gE here]] as the movie version, but it also happens in the original Broadway recording. Clearly, in the movie movie, he can't have mistaken Mimi for Mark, who had just left, and as Mimi has to tell Roger her name at the end of the song she can't actually have left anything there. Seems small, but I mulled that over the rest of the entire movie.



** This is explained in the Fridge Logic page. When he walks back in with Collins he says something like "Look who I found" implying that he went to the street, bumped into Collins and Angel and then walked with them to the apartment to have a little hangout (probably persuaded by the goodies Collins brought) and then leaves after "Today 4 U" to attend to Maureen.

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** This is explained in on the Fridge Logic page. When he walks back in with Collins he says something like "Look who I found" implying that he went to the street, bumped into Collins and Angel and then walked with them to the apartment to have a little hangout (probably persuaded by the goodies Collins brought) and then leaves after "Today 4 U" to attend to Maureen.



* How did Roger [[spoiler:get enough money for gas to and from Santa Fe, considering the fact that he had to sell an electric guitar just to afford the car]]?

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* How did Roger [[spoiler:get [[spoiler: get enough money for gas to and from Santa Fe, considering the fact that he had to sell an electric guitar just to afford the car]]?



** Also, cars in movies, TV and theater tend to get ''great'' mileage, [[WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief for some reason]].

* How in the ''world'' did ThePowerOfRock [[spoiler:somehow make Mimi's '''fever break''']]? (other than [[EmotionalAppeal the obvious]] [[YouFailBiologyForever Her AIDS-infected body would not be strong enough to fight off]] whatever it was [[spoiler:killing her (almost), be it a cold, starvation, anorexia, overdose, or whatever it was that was killing her. (It's implied to be a disease that she can't fight off, but I don't remember it ever being made abundantly clear outside of implication.]]
** It's pretty obvious: ThePowerOfRock combined with [[spoiler:DivineIntervention (in the form of a literal Angel).]]

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** Also, cars in movies, TV TV, and theater tend to get ''great'' mileage, [[WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief for some reason]].

* How in the ''world'' did ThePowerOfRock [[spoiler:somehow make Mimi's '''fever break''']]? (other than [[EmotionalAppeal the obvious]] [[YouFailBiologyForever Her AIDS-infected body would not be strong enough to fight off]] whatever it was [[spoiler:killing [[spoiler: killing her (almost), be it a cold, starvation, anorexia, overdose, or whatever it was that was killing her. (It's implied to be a disease that she can't fight off, but I don't remember it ever being made abundantly clear outside of implication.]]
** It's pretty obvious: ThePowerOfRock combined with [[spoiler:DivineIntervention [[spoiler: DivineIntervention (in the form of a literal Angel).]]



** In reply to the YouFailBiologyForever note, [[spoiler: is it clear that Mimi has full blown AIDS? The show indicates she is HIV positive, but the progression to full blown AIDS is the part that destroys the immune system. It could be just her body fighting off the infection, something that is possible if the body has progressed to full blown AIDS]]
*** We know [[spoiler:Roger has AIDS ("his girlfriend April left a note saying "we've got AIDS...") as do Angel and Collins ("this body provides a comfortable home for the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome"). The distinction between HIV and AIDS was much less well-understood around the time the musical is set (1988-1990), and that was part of the reason the treatments available (like AZT) had limited efficacy. It's probably safe to assume Mimi had AIDS also, or that her HIV becomes AIDS during the play, which would account for her declining health.]]
** On that note, [[spoiler:what exactly was it that almost killed Mimi?]]
*** It's never made clear, is it? Though for some reason I always assumed [[spoiler:hypothermia]]. I'm probably very wrong.
*** [[spoiler: Hypothermia would actually makes sense, if it wasn't for the fever. Possibly tuberculosis or similar respiratory condition - maybe a link back to ''Theatre/LaBoheme''?]]
*** Opportunistic infection? [[spoiler: Mimi had just either been to or dropped out of rehab, which would be a physically gruelling process on the body of someone simultaneously dealing with AIDS.]]
** Christopher Columbus, director of TheMovie, stated in commentary (I think?) that he believes Mimi [[spoiler:died]] soon after the musical ended, anyway. Then again, [[AdaptationDecay what he did]] could possibly negate any kind of opinion he has, YMMV.

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** In reply to the YouFailBiologyForever note, [[spoiler: is it clear that Mimi has full blown full-blown AIDS? The show indicates she is HIV positive, but the progression to full blown full-blown AIDS is the part that destroys the immune system. It could be just her body fighting off the infection, something that is possible if the body has progressed to full blown full-blown AIDS]]
*** We know [[spoiler:Roger [[spoiler: Roger has AIDS ("his girlfriend April left a note saying "we've got AIDS...") as do Angel and Collins ("this body provides a comfortable home for the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome"). The distinction between HIV and AIDS was much less well-understood around the time the musical is set (1988-1990), and that was part of the reason the treatments available (like AZT) had limited efficacy. It's probably safe to assume Mimi had AIDS also, or that her HIV becomes AIDS during the play, which would account for her declining health.]]
** On that note, [[spoiler:what [[spoiler: what exactly was it that almost killed Mimi?]]
*** It's never made clear, is it? Though for some reason I always assumed [[spoiler:hypothermia]].[[spoiler: hypothermia]]. I'm probably very wrong.
*** [[spoiler: Hypothermia would actually makes sense, make sense if it wasn't for the fever. Possibly tuberculosis or similar respiratory condition - maybe a link back to ''Theatre/LaBoheme''?]]
*** Opportunistic infection? [[spoiler: Mimi had just either been to or dropped out of rehab, which would be a physically gruelling grueling process on the body of someone simultaneously dealing with AIDS.]]
** Christopher Columbus, director of TheMovie, stated in the commentary (I think?) that he believes Mimi [[spoiler:died]] [[spoiler: died]] soon after the musical ended, anyway. Then again, [[AdaptationDecay what he did]] could possibly negate any kind of opinion he has, YMMV.



*** Agreed. IIRC, Adam Pascal commented that maybe jumping on the table and starting CPR would detract from the "operatic" sense of the sequence. Personally, i always found it difficult seeing that sequence and counting 58 seconds into the Golden Hour with sod-all happening...

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*** Agreed. IIRC, Adam Pascal commented that maybe jumping on the table and starting CPR would detract from the "operatic" sense of the sequence. Personally, i I always found it difficult seeing that sequence and counting 58 seconds into the Golden Hour with sod-all happening...



** I would call Angel a cross-dresser. Generally, transgender people feel uncomfortable appearing or being referred to as their born gender, which is not the case, seeing as we see Angel dressed as a man at least twice, and referring to herself as such in La Vie Boheme. The 'To Sodomy, it's between God and me' choreography also struck me as very un-transgenderlike. The term that Mark uses, 'drag queen', doesn't fit either, because a drag queen is specifically a man who dresses as a woman for the purpose of entertainment. Cross-dresser or gender non-comformist seem to fit Angel the best.
** This is rather arguable, but she seems to be transgender, based on her behavior. That is, she's a girl in mind and a male in body. She's not a transvestite, because a transvestite would have a male inner identity and a female outer identity, and thus act less, well, feminine... She's not transsexual, because she has not (and obviously will never) undergone the necessary operations.

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** I would call Angel a cross-dresser. Generally, transgender people feel uncomfortable appearing or being referred to as their born gender, which is not the case, seeing as we see Angel dressed as a man at least twice, and referring to herself as such in La Vie Boheme. The 'To Sodomy, it's between God and me' choreography also struck me as very un-transgenderlike.un-transgender-like. The term that Mark uses, 'drag queen', doesn't fit either, because a drag queen is specifically a man who dresses as a woman for the purpose of entertainment. Cross-dresser or gender non-comformist non-conformist seem to fit Angel the best.
** This is rather arguable, but she seems to be transgender, based on her behavior. That is, she's a girl in mind and a male in body. She's not a transvestite, because a transvestite would have a male inner identity and a female outer identity, and thus act less, well, feminine... She's not transsexual, transsexual because she has not (and obviously will never) undergone the necessary operations.



*** Also, during the Broadway version of [[spoiler:the funeral scene, Angel's walking around the back of the stage draped in a white bed sheet during the eulogies. During Mark's, when he refers to her as "he", she looks at him like, wtf. When Mark corrects himself and says "she", she looks and smiles like, "Thaaats better ^^"]]

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*** Also, during the Broadway version of [[spoiler:the [[spoiler: the funeral scene, Angel's walking around the back of the stage draped in a white bed sheet during the eulogies. During Mark's, when he refers to her as "he", she looks at him like, wtf. When Mark corrects himself and says "she", she looks and smiles like, "Thaaats better ^^"]]



** S/he self-identifies as female plenty. Collins has probably dated men for a long time, and is not used to the idea of a genderqueer or trans partner, and reverts to the default he by accident, or it could be the fact that the people like Maureen, Joanne, and Mimi, who saw her/im first dressed like a normal (if rather eccentric) woman engaged in conversation fully enveloped in the female persona refer to Angel as 'she' while Collins who saw Angel first in a male persona refers to her/im as a he. Mark and Roger, who saw Angel first in a pretty obvious costume with overdone makeup, vary from he to she. It may be that Angel is genderqueer, and doesn't mind which one is used, so s/he lets her friends call her/im what they want. There's more than three options, and if s/he were a transvestite, s/he would identify as male, and probably have a problem with her/is friends using female pronouns instead of encouraging it. Look up Eddie Izzard's "Transvestite" routine.

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** S/he self-identifies as female plenty. Collins has probably dated men for a long time, and is not used to the idea of a genderqueer or trans partner, and reverts to the default he by accident, or it could be the fact that the people like Maureen, Joanne, and Mimi, who saw her/im first dressed like a normal (if rather eccentric) woman engaged in conversation fully enveloped in the female persona refer to Angel as 'she' while Collins who saw Angel first in a male persona refers to her/im as a he. Mark and Roger, who saw Angel first in a pretty obvious costume with overdone makeup, vary from he to she. her. It may be that Angel is genderqueer, and doesn't mind which one is used, so s/he lets her friends call her/im her/him what they want. There's There are more than three options, and if s/he were a transvestite, s/he would identify as male, and probably have a problem with her/is her/his friends using female pronouns instead of encouraging it. Look up Eddie Izzard's "Transvestite" routine.



** She makes bad decisions, pure and simple. She's a 19 year old kid who's in way over her head but can't really admit it to herself.

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** She makes bad decisions, pure and simple. She's a 19 year old 19-year-old kid who's in way over her head but can't really admit it to herself.



** Mimi's kind of a hedonist / nihilist in terms of her relationship with her condition. Her recklessness is simply part of her character and her attempt to cope with her lot in life.

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** Mimi's kind of a hedonist / nihilist hedonist/nihilist in terms of her relationship with her condition. Her recklessness is simply part of her character and her attempt to cope with her lot in life.



*** Rodger hasn't left the house since he started suffering from withdrawal symptoms, and he didn't stop taking drugs until after April commited suicide. When Collins first arrives at Mark and Rodger's apartment, he says something about Rodger not going out/talking to anyone on the phone in the past seven months, so it's safe to say that it's been quite a while since April died (though he's still bitterly depressed over the whole thing, which is reasonable).
** In the first Tune Up Mark says "(Roger is) just coming back from half a year of withdrawl."

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*** Rodger hasn't left the house since he started suffering from withdrawal symptoms, and he didn't stop taking drugs until after April commited committed suicide. When Collins first arrives at Mark and Rodger's apartment, he says something about Rodger not going out/talking to anyone on the phone in the past seven months, so it's safe to say that it's been quite a while since April died (though he's still bitterly depressed over the whole thing, which is reasonable).
** In the first Tune Up Tune-Up Mark says "(Roger is) just coming back from half a year of withdrawl.withdrawal."



*** The Roger/April heroin flashback only happens in be film. That's a specific artistic choice, but it's not canon to the play.

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*** The Roger/April heroin flashback only happens in be the film. That's a specific artistic choice, but it's not canon to the play.



*** This is actually FridgeBrilliance. The movie is set in 1989 when HIV and AIDS really blew up and people were just learning how it was contracted. AIDS had only been clinically documented in America in 1981 - 8 years before the movie takes place. The fact that a virus precluded AIDS wasn't discovered until 1983. HIV was only used as a clinical term for what people thought were two different viruses in 1986. That's 3 years to know if you get HIV, it becomes AIDS, much less how to prevent it. It's a lot easier to discover how you ''got'' something that knowing all the ways to ''not'' contract something. And Mimi is a 19 year old S and M dancer. The dates I'm using are academic study dates, not when the information became widespread and public. That's kind of the point of the play. There's a break in La Vie Boheme - '''"Actual reality, act up, fight AIDS"''' A lot of them didn't ''have'' the information to prevent contracting the virus.
*** Bingo. The connection with ACT UP is important, because ACT UP were most active during the period before antiretrovirals became available, and splintered later before combination therapy proved to be effective in the mid-90s. At this point they are still operating on pretty bad science. AZT at this point alone was wildly variable in how useful it was from patient to patient, but it was put into mass circulation very quickly because it was cheap and the only viable option available at the time. AZT used alone fell out of favour not long after the period this play is ostensibly set.

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*** This is actually FridgeBrilliance. The movie is set in 1989 when HIV and AIDS really blew up and people were just learning how it was contracted. AIDS had only been clinically documented in America in 1981 - 8 years before the movie takes place. The fact that a virus precluded AIDS wasn't discovered until 1983. HIV was only used as a clinical term for what people thought were two different viruses in 1986. That's 3 years to know if you get HIV, it becomes AIDS, much less how to prevent it. It's a lot easier to discover how you ''got'' something that knowing all the ways to ''not'' contract something. And Mimi is a 19 year old 19-year-old S and M dancer. The dates I'm using are academic study dates, not when the information became widespread and public. That's kind of the point of the play. There's a break in La Vie Boheme - '''"Actual reality, act up, fight AIDS"''' A lot of them didn't ''have'' the information to prevent contracting the virus.
*** Bingo. The connection with ACT UP is important, important because ACT UP were was most active during the period before antiretrovirals became available, and splintered later before combination therapy proved to be effective in the mid-90s. At this point point, they are still operating on pretty bad science. AZT at this point alone was wildly variable in how useful it was from patient to patient, but it was put into mass circulation very quickly because it was cheap and the only viable option available at the time. AZT used alone fell out of favour not long after the period this play is ostensibly set.



* Is anybody else bugged that the entire first act takes place within a couple of hours. Somehow it makes some of the songs ("I'll Cover You" comes to mind) somewhat less meaninful. It also gives me a headache trying to come up with an exact timeline for everything...
** The movie is much worse for this. The movie starts and it's December 24th, 9pm. The sun comes up, goes down, comes up again and it's Christmas Day. What day was in between?

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* Is anybody else bugged that the entire first act takes place within a couple of hours. Somehow it makes some of the songs ("I'll Cover You" comes to mind) somewhat less meaninful.meaningful. It also gives me a headache trying to come up with an exact timeline for everything...
** The movie is much worse for this. The movie starts and it's December 24th, 9pm.9 pm. The sun comes up, goes down, comes up again and it's Christmas Day. What day was in between?



* Just what exactly is Roger so upset about in Another Day?. I understand that he's still carrying a torch for April, and that Mimi probably came on a little strong, along with whatever she was actually suggesting they do but he seems to have over reacted for no real reason.

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* Just what exactly is Roger so upset about in Another Day?. I understand that he's still carrying a torch for April, April and that Mimi probably came on a little strong, along with whatever she was actually suggesting they do but he seems to have over reacted overreacted for no real reason.



*** This is made clearer in the film version, where he's actually sort of into it (he smiles at her when she climbs through his window) BEFORE she pulls out the heroin and brandishes it at him. He's just gone through a painful withdrawal and taking Mimi up on her offer would negate those months of suffering he spent trying to get clean.
*** Not to mention his last girlfriend killed herself (and or died, in the movie version, it's ambiguous) after passing him the virus. If you listen closely, he hasn't even left the apartment in at least seven months. Then in walks this girl he likes with BUT with the thing that is killing him (he contracted the virus sharing drugs and/or through sex, but mostly likely drugs) not to mention he's a ''recovering addict'', he's got HIV and he's worried about passing it to someone else. (I should tell you./I should tell you./ NO!) His last relationship ended brutally and hypothetically his only contact has been with Mark. Mimi may have been the first person he talked to other than Mark for as much as seven months. (Collins was at MIT for at least that long, Maureen had broken up with Mark. He'd literally just saw Collins and Angel earlier that day after meeting Mimi.). I would have thrown her out for one of those reasons, much less ''all'' of them. The only reason his friends seem to take Mimi's side in things is that he's shutting everyone out. They don't know she brought drugs with her. His only fault is in not explaining any of this because he's afraid. (Again, I should tell you/I should tell you.) That's why everyone is so happy when he shows up at the Life Support meeting - because he left the damn house.
** I figured he was really, truly interested and wanted to take her up on her offer, but from his point of view, he had AIDS, and she did not. He didn't want to spread it to her. His anger spill was a quickly, poorly, improvised idea to get her away. He thought about telling her the truth ("I should tell you, I should tell you..."), but was too afraid. Poor decision making on his part, but understandable.
*** I think this is it. Roger is dealing with a lot emotionally around his illness because of the death of his girlfriend, who died because they shared drugs - he might feel a degree of responsibility there. He's also definitely attracted to Mimi (this is clear in "Light My Candle") and from the lyrics to the song he knows something would happen ("our temperatures would climb, there'd be a long embrace..."). It's a breakthrough moment for Roger because not knowing what to do about Mimi is part of what gets him out of the house finally, but he responds aggressively probably because he's as angry at himself as he is at her. It's also justifiable he would be angry that she brought heroin into the apartment at all, since he is only a recently recovered addict.
** I see it as consistent with his (justifiable) emotional issues. He snaps when Collins and Mark try to get him out of the house and to a support meeting - Angel is not offended and calms them all down, saying he's just tired. He's hostile when Mark tries to get him to go out to dinner or reminds him take his medication. He's withdrawn and moody after dealing with his impending death, his girlfriend's suicide, and his withdrawal for the last however many months, then Mimi comes in and he's overwhelmed because he does like her and that's emotionally dangerous to him.

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*** This is made clearer in the film version, where he's actually he's, actually, sort of into it (he smiles at her when she climbs through his window) BEFORE she pulls out the heroin and brandishes it at him. He's just gone through a painful withdrawal and taking Mimi up on her offer would negate those months of suffering he spent trying to get clean.
*** Not to mention his last girlfriend killed herself (and or died, in the movie version, it's ambiguous) after passing him the virus. If you listen closely, he hasn't even left the apartment in for at least seven months. Then in walks this girl he likes with BUT with the thing that is killing him (he contracted the virus sharing drugs and/or through sex, but mostly most likely drugs) not to mention he's a ''recovering addict'', he's got HIV and he's worried about passing it to someone else. (I should tell you./I should tell you./ NO!) His last relationship ended brutally and hypothetically his only contact has been with Mark. Mimi may have been the first person he talked to other than Mark for as much as seven months. (Collins was at MIT for at least that long, Maureen had broken up with Mark. He'd literally just saw Collins and Angel earlier that day after meeting Mimi.). I would have thrown her out for one of those reasons, much less ''all'' of them. The only reason his friends seem to take Mimi's side in things is that he's shutting everyone out. They don't know she brought drugs with her. His only fault is in not explaining any of this because he's afraid. (Again, I should tell you/I should tell you.) That's why everyone is so happy when he shows up at the Life Support meeting - because he left the damn house.
** I figured he was really, truly interested and wanted to take her up on her offer, but from his point of view, he had AIDS, and she did not. He didn't want to spread it to her. His anger spill was a quickly, quick, poorly, improvised idea to get her away. He thought about telling her the truth ("I should tell you, I should tell you..."), but was too afraid. Poor decision making on his part, but understandable.
*** I think this is it. Roger is dealing with a lot emotionally around his illness because of the death of his girlfriend, who died because they shared drugs - he might feel a degree of responsibility there. He's also definitely attracted to Mimi (this is clear in "Light My Candle") and from the lyrics to the song song, he knows something would happen ("our temperatures would climb, there'd be a long embrace..."). It's a breakthrough moment for Roger because not knowing what to do about Mimi is part of what gets him out of the house finally, but he responds aggressively probably because he's as angry at himself as he is at her. It's also justifiable he would be angry that she brought heroin into the apartment at all, all since he is only a recently recovered addict.
** I see it as consistent with his (justifiable) emotional issues. He snaps when Collins and Mark try to get him out of the house and to a support meeting - Angel is not offended and calms them all down, saying he's just tired. He's hostile when Mark tries to get him to go out to dinner or reminds him to take his medication. He's withdrawn and moody after dealing with his impending death, his girlfriend's suicide, and his withdrawal for the last however many months, then Mimi comes in and he's overwhelmed because he does like her and that's emotionally dangerous to him.



*** Well, that's kinda reaching since there's no indication that Benny ''isn't'' HIV positive and just unaware of it. I think the point was the moral implications that Mimi may be not only chancing infecting a clean person, but a ''married'' clean person - so she's risking his wife as well.

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*** Well, that's kinda reaching since there's no indication that Benny ''isn't'' HIV positive and just unaware of it. I think the point was the moral implications that Mimi may be not only chancing infecting a clean person, person but a ''married'' clean person - so she's risking his wife as well.



** It's possible (perhaps even likely) he and his wife are infected, and that this is FridgeBrilliance. After all, it's fair to argue that people only really started to pay attention to and take serious action against HIV/AIDS when it began to spread into the 'normal' and 'respectable' (i.e. straight, middle-class, non-drug abusing etc.) community that Benny is used to represent, and it had to get there somehow.

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** It's possible (perhaps even likely) he and his wife are infected, and that this is FridgeBrilliance. After all, it's fair to argue that people only really started to pay attention to and take serious action against HIV/AIDS when it began to spread into the 'normal' and 'respectable' (i.e. straight, middle-class, non-drug abusing etc.) community that Benny is used to represent, representing, and it had to get there somehow.



* On rewatching the film, isn't there a bit of an incongruity around the lyrics Mimi is singing in Out Tonight when on-shift? "I wanna put on a tight skirt and flirt with a stranger"? Surely that would be a little overdressed for her, seeing that her work attire is G-string, bra and boots? Not so much in the play - but in the film as shot...

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* On rewatching the film, isn't there a bit of an incongruity around the lyrics Mimi is singing in Out Tonight when on-shift? "I wanna put on a tight skirt and flirt with a stranger"? Surely that would be a little overdressed for her, seeing that her work attire is G-string, bra bra, and boots? Not so much in the play - but in the film as shot...



*** Hmm, I'm a little confused with what you are asking? Are you asking if its a bit over dressed for her job, or for her in general? I think she is talking about when her shift is up, she would like to get dressed up and go out to flirt with strangers...

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*** Hmm, I'm a little confused with about what you are asking? Are you asking if its a bit over dressed overdressed for her job, or for her in general? I think she is talking about when her shift is up, she would like to get dressed up and go out to flirt with strangers...



* The show takes place over the course of one year. This is a widely understood fact. Over the course of this single year, every main character except Mimi meets Angel for the first time on Christmas Eve. (I think, at least. Isn't it at least implied that Mimi knew Angel before "December 24th, 9:00 PM"?) Anyway, at [[spoiler:Angel's funeral]] on Halloween, Maureen says that "you'd find an old tablecloth on the street and make a dress and sure enough, they'd be mass-producing them at the GAP a year later." How would Maureen know "what would happen" a year later if she only knew Angel for ten months?

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* The show takes place over the course of one year. This is a widely understood fact. Over the course of this single year, every main character except Mimi meets Angel for the first time on Christmas Eve. (I think, at least. Isn't it at least implied that Mimi knew Angel before "December 24th, 9:00 PM"?) Anyway, at [[spoiler:Angel's [[spoiler: Angel's funeral]] on Halloween, Maureen says that "you'd find an old tablecloth on the street and make a dress and sure enough, they'd be mass-producing them at the GAP a year later." How would Maureen know "what would happen" a year later if she only knew Angel for ten months?



* What really bugs me is that Benny brings his father-in-law/investor to the Life Cafe where all the others are hanging out. "Oh, gee, I have a conservative father-in-law who can make or break my business on a whim. I really need to impress him. I know! I'll take him to dinner at a vegetarian cafe well-known to be a hangout for all my flaky queer artist friends! That couldn't possibly go wrong!" It just seems beyond implausible that the kind of place where a guy like Benny would take a potential investor could also be the kind of place where Mark & company would hang out, and particularly the kind of place that would put up with them hanging around and not buying anything. (And, sure, the waiter tried to kick Mark & company out... but he didn't persist very much, and they were obviously repeat offenders.)

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* What really bugs me is that Benny brings his father-in-law/investor to the Life Cafe where all the others are hanging out. "Oh, gee, I have a conservative father-in-law who can make or break my business on a whim. I really need to impress him. I know! I'll take him to dinner at a vegetarian cafe well-known to be a hangout for all my flaky queer artist friends! That couldn't possibly go wrong!" It just seems beyond implausible that the kind of place where a guy like Benny would take a potential investor could also be the kind of place where Mark & company would hang out, and particularly the kind of place that would put up with them hanging around and not buying buy anything. (And, sure, the waiter tried to kick Mark & company out... but he didn't persist very much, and they were obviously repeat offenders.)



* Mimi seems to break every golden rule of exotic dancers. 1. She uses her real name. 2. She lives within walking distance of her club. 3. She walks home through dark alleyways completely alone and still wearing her sexy outfits. All of those things are practically laws to abide amongst dancers. Hell, lots of girls have to ask a bouncer to walk with her to her car in the parking lot to make sure she's safe, let alone WALKING THROUGH DARK SLEEZY SECTION OF NEW YORK CITY COMPLETELY UNPROTECTED.

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* Mimi seems to break every golden rule of exotic dancers. 1. She uses her real name. 2. She lives within walking distance of her club. 3. She walks home through dark alleyways completely alone and still wearing her sexy outfits. All of those things are practically laws to abide amongst dancers. Hell, lots of girls have to ask a bouncer to walk with her to her car in the parking lot to make sure she's safe, let alone WALKING THROUGH DARK SLEEZY SLEAZY SECTION OF NEW YORK CITY COMPLETELY UNPROTECTED.



*** Mimi is the Italian diminutive of Maria, so I always assumed that her name was really Maria Marquez. Collins possibly knew her last name because of Angel, since it is heavily implied that Mimi and Angel were friends before joining up with Mark and Co. As for the walking home from the club, in the stageplay, the entire Out Tonight sequence takes place in Mimi's apartment, so she's not walking home alone. Plus, the exact location of the Cat Scratch Club in relation to the apartment is (to my knowledge, feel free to correct me) never mentioned. Also, you have to remember that this is New York City. "Walking distance" is a little different for people who are used to walking everywhere, since most people don't own cars and taking a taxi everywhere can get pretty pricey. And it was the 90's. Lame excuse, but, honestly, the world seemed a lot safer to people back then, even if it wasn't. And it stands to reason that a girl like Mimi knows how to defend herself. Of course, this is just what I've come up with after seeing the movie, the Filmed Live version, a local production, and listening to the music. I could be wrong, but yeah. That's my opinion.

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*** Mimi is the Italian diminutive of Maria, so I always assumed that her name was really Maria Marquez. Collins possibly knew her last name because of Angel, since it is heavily implied that Mimi and Angel were friends before joining up with Mark and Co. As for the walking home from the club, in the stageplay, stage play, the entire Out Tonight sequence takes place in Mimi's apartment, so she's not walking home alone. Plus, the exact location of the Cat Scratch Club in relation to the apartment is (to my knowledge, feel free to correct me) never mentioned. Also, you have to remember that this is New York City. "Walking distance" is a little different for people who are used to walking everywhere, since most people don't own cars and taking a taxi everywhere can get pretty pricey. And it was the 90's. Lame excuse, but, honestly, the world seemed a lot safer to people back then, even if it wasn't. And it stands to reason that a girl like Mimi knows how to defend herself. Of course, this is just what I've come up with after seeing the movie, the Filmed Live version, a local production, and listening to the music. I could be wrong, but yeah. That's my opinion.



*** I don't know the background of you guys, but I'll give you mine before I add to this. My mother was a bartender in strip clubs in her youth, I have roomed with, lived with, and partied with dancers in the last 3 years. I have daited dancers, bouncers and djs... Now as per my addition to this.. My best friend is a dancer and aswell as her, most of the girls/men I have met through my social network do go by their stage name within their group of friends. Its funner, easier, and more well known for the people they are around. I cannot say this is true for all dancers but for the most I've met it has been. Also alot of the girls I know have been known to occasionaly wear their work clothes home and even out to the bar or to parties depending on their plans for the night and the time they have.

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*** I don't know the background of you guys, but I'll give you mine before I add to this. My mother was a bartender in strip clubs in her youth, I have roomed with, lived with, and partied with dancers in the last 3 years. I have daited dated dancers, bouncers bouncers, and djs...DJs... Now as per my addition to this.. My best friend is a dancer and aswell as well as her, most of the girls/men I have met through my social network do go by their stage name within their group of friends. Its funner, easier, and more well known for the people they are around. I cannot say this is true for all dancers but for the most I've met it has been. Also alot Also, a lot of the girls I know have been known to occasionaly occasionally wear their work clothes home and even out to the bar or to parties depending on their plans for the night and the time they have.



* Why is ''Joanne'' so ticked off in "Tango: Maureen?" I mean, sure, she told Maureen not to call Mark, but she even says in the song, "... And to top it all off, I'm with ''you''." I would think Mark has the right to be more hacked off, since he's the one who got dumped.

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* Why is ''Joanne'' so ticked off in "Tango: Maureen?" I mean, sure, she told Maureen not to call Mark, but she even says in the song, "... And to top it all off, I'm with ''you''." I would think Mark has the right to be more hacked off, off since he's the one who got dumped.



** I read one fanfic with an alternate explanation: Maureen told Joanne that she had broken up with Mark for some reason other than "I was cheating on him with you," possibly by telling her ''Mark'' had cheated on ''her'' [[WoundedGazelleGambit to gain sympathy]]. Thus, Joanne was feeling vengeful against an ex who (to her knowledge) had not only cheated on her Honey Bear, but was also a big enough influence that Maureen would go crawling to the scumbag for him to fix her sound system. Hence the reason why she hired an engineer herself, and why she yells, "She cheated!" as in, "Maureen said ''you'' cheated!", which fits with the whole "Maureen lies" theme of the song.

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** I read one fanfic with an alternate explanation: Maureen told Joanne that she had broken up with Mark for some reason other than "I was cheating on him with you," possibly by telling her ''Mark'' had cheated on ''her'' [[WoundedGazelleGambit to gain sympathy]]. Thus, Joanne was feeling vengeful against an ex who (to her knowledge) had not only cheated on her Honey Bear, Bear but was also a big enough influence that Maureen would go crawling to the scumbag for him to fix her sound system. Hence the reason why she hired an engineer herself, and why she yells, "She cheated!" as in, "Maureen said ''you'' cheated!", which fits with the whole "Maureen lies" theme of the song.



* Does Joanne have any proof that Maureen cheats on her? I don't recall how explicit it is in the stageplay, but in the movie all we have to go on is Joanne's say-so and Maureen complimenting two women's necklaces.
** In the stage-play, Joanne walks in during La Vie Boheme just in time to see Maureen making out with another girl. Also it's kind of implied during Tango: Maureen that when she starts using the nickname "pookie" on partners, it means she's cheating on them. Cue Joanne getting a phone-call at the end of the song and reacting badly to Maureen calling her "pookie".

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* Does Joanne have any proof that Maureen cheats on her? I don't recall how explicit it is in the stageplay, stage play, but in the movie movie, all we have to go on is Joanne's say-so and Maureen complimenting two women's necklaces.
** In the stage-play, Joanne walks in during La Vie Boheme just in time to see Maureen making out with another girl. Also Also, it's kind of implied during Tango: Maureen that when she starts using the nickname "pookie" "Pookie" on partners, it means she's cheating on them. Cue Joanne getting a phone-call at the end of the song and reacting badly to Maureen calling her "pookie".
"Pookie".



** Possibly also because Musetta's Waltz is simply the most recognisable theme from ''Theatre/LaBoheme''.

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** Possibly also because Musetta's Waltz is simply the most recognisable recognizable theme from ''Theatre/LaBoheme''.



** Or, here's a weird idea, maybe Maureen simply preferred to not get pregnant and thus used condoms when sleeping around. Or alternatively, she preferred to not contract any other STD and thus also used protection when sleeping with other women. Maureen is a bit older than Mimi and pardon me, a bit smarter too. And it's not like you automatically give no shit about your health because you are promiscuous.

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** Or, here's a weird idea, maybe Maureen simply preferred to not get pregnant and thus used condoms when sleeping around. Or alternatively, she preferred to not contract any other STD and thus also used protection when sleeping with other women. Maureen is a bit older than Mimi and and, pardon me, a bit smarter too. And it's not like you automatically give no shit about your health because you are promiscuous.



* This isn't a question so much as an "It Just Bugs Me", but the fact that most of the first Act takes place within a few hours tends to make some of the emotions the characters feel a bit contrived. For example, Angel singing "I'll Cover You" to Collins when they've only just met or the conversation between Benny and Mimi in "La Vie Boheme". "We're taking it slow"? No, not really. In the space of a couple hours, they gave an exposition on their lifestyles, had a dramatic fight, made up and went on a date where she met his closest friends. I'd say that's pretty quick if not completely normal.

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* This isn't a question so much as an "It Just Bugs Me", but the fact that most of the first Act takes place within a few hours tends to make some of the emotions the characters feel a bit contrived. For example, Angel singing "I'll Cover You" to Collins when they've only just met or the conversation between Benny and Mimi in "La Vie Boheme". "We're taking it slow"? No, not really. In the space of a couple hours, they gave an exposition on of their lifestyles, had a dramatic fight, made up and went on a date where she met his closest friends. I'd say that's pretty quick if not completely normal.



* In "Happy New Year B", when Benny asks Mark to film his granting them a key to the building, everybody gets all indignant and Roger says "Oh, I see, this is a photo opportunity." Did it occur to nobody that maybe Benny was trying to put on the record his permission to live in the building. I can see Maureen reacting like that, cause she doesn't think before she speaks, but Roger, Mark, Angel and Collins all heard Benny offer to guarantee on paper their rent-free tenancy, and Joanne is a lawyer. One might expect them to realize that by putting the matter on film, Benny was making it so they could legally be residents and not just squatters. Benny is occasionally a jerk to his former roommates, but most of his actions are motivated by a desire to improve the neighborhood.

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* In "Happy New Year B", when Benny asks Mark to film his granting them a key to the building, everybody gets all indignant and Roger says "Oh, I see, this is a photo opportunity." Did it occur to nobody that maybe Benny was trying to put on the record his permission to live in the building. building? I can see Maureen reacting like that, cause she doesn't think before she speaks, but Roger, Mark, Angel Angel, and Collins all heard Benny offer to guarantee on paper their rent-free tenancy, and Joanne is a lawyer. One might expect them to realize that by putting the matter on film, Benny was making it so they could legally be residents and not just squatters. Benny is occasionally a jerk to his former roommates, but most of his actions are motivated by a desire to improve the neighborhood.



*** Also, Roger is pissed because he's just found out Mimi has had some kind of contact with Benny, since Benny claims (sleazily) it was Mimi who convinced him to let them back in the house.

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*** Also, Roger is pissed because he's just found out Mimi has had some kind of contact with Benny, Benny since Benny claims (sleazily) it was Mimi who convinced him to let them back in the house.



* How much cash does Collins have? On one hand, he's mentioned to (probably) be living in a shantytown circa "Take Me or Leave Me" (Valentine's Day or so?), [[spoiler:needs Benny's help paying for Angel's funeral]], seems to get the cash for gifts from either Angel's gig or hacking ATMs, and has a far better relationship with the rest of the cast than the obviously-rick Benny. On the other hand, he was a professor at MIT and got sacked only just before the play started, which had to have gotten him a solid paycheck.

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* How much cash does Collins have? On one hand, he's mentioned to (probably) be living in a shantytown circa "Take Me or Leave Me" (Valentine's Day or so?), [[spoiler:needs [[spoiler: needs Benny's help paying for Angel's funeral]], seems to get the cash for gifts from either Angel's gig or hacking ATMs, and has a far better relationship with the rest of the cast than the obviously-rick Benny. On the other hand, he was a professor at MIT and got sacked only just before the play started, which had to have gotten him a solid paycheck.



* Joanne graduated from Harvard Law School during an economy when that was still a pretty good shot at a pretty good job. Why is she hanging out with a bunch of underemployed quasi-artists in Alphabet City? Doesn't she have her own friends?

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* Joanne graduated from Harvard Law School during in an economy when that was still a pretty good shot at a pretty good job. Why is she hanging out with a bunch of underemployed quasi-artists in Alphabet City? Doesn't she have her own friends?



** Mark is an observer, living vicariously through his friends. "That night" (Christmas Eve) brought together what elsewhere in the play is referred to as a "family" - Roger and Mimi, but also Angel and Collins, and acquainted Mark and Joanne, and Angel and everyone else (and Angel is the heart and conscience of the play.) This "connection" is what sets everything that happens over the next 12 months in motion, when what Mark might have done every other day was go to the protest with Collins, and then go home to Roger.

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** Mark is an observer, living vicariously through his friends. "That night" (Christmas Eve) brought together what elsewhere in the play is referred to as a "family" - Roger and Mimi, but also Angel and Collins, and acquainted Mark and Joanne, and Angel and everyone else (and Angel is the heart and conscience of the play.) This "connection" is what sets everything that happens over the next 12 months in motion, motion when what Mark might have done every other day was go to the protest with Collins, Collins and then go home to Roger.



** This is one of the elements that hasn't aged well in the play. Interestingly, when the Original Broadway Cast reunited for the film, ten years on, they acknowledged that their read of the play as adults was different - that there is a petulance to the Bohemian characters and their behaviour. But also, Manhattan - and specifically Alphabet City - was financially destitute at this point in time, historically. Artsy types were drawn there purely for the vibes even when they came from better backgrounds (Mark for example is firmly middle class and still in contact with his parents, as is Joanne, whose parents seem to be political figures of some kind), but plenty of people were also living that way out of necessity. The block where the apartment is is described as a "tent city" and is full of homeless and addicts and people dying from a poorly understood, worse-treated disease. Mark and Roger (per the title song) feel like they're witnessing the worst of humanity - their former Bohemian friend Benny trying to run out the homeless and the destitute that he used to live with - and their response is that paying rent is paying "The Man", and the man isn't doing anything for them, so why should they?
** Except that The Man (here personified by Benny) ''is'' doing something for them, by allowing them to live in a building rent-free (a luxury that many people on impossibly low income would die for). He later goes back on his eviction notice despite the protest going ahead, which suggests that it may have been an empty threat all along. He also ends up paying for both Angel's funeral and Mimi's rehab. This whole issue continues to be a point of contention between the show's fans and its detractors: some of the characters often go out of their way to ''avoid'' earning money honestly out of supposed principle or dedication to their art, but are still happy to let rich friends and family pay their way for them, or even re-wire ATM machines to steal from banks. The play even points out that both Mark and Maureen's championing of the homeless is also self-serving, and arguably not actually helping the homeless that much. Whether you sympathise with the main characters or not mostly ends up being a matter of personal perspective.
*** One important point is that Benny isn't asking them to START PAYING rent, he is after "last year's rent" - so charging retrospectively a large sum most wouldn't have up front - and had supposedly said they could live there without paying when he bought the place, having previously been their room mate.

to:

** This is one of the elements that hasn't aged well in the play. Interestingly, when the Original Broadway Cast reunited for the film, ten years on, they acknowledged that their read of the play as adults was different - that there is a petulance to the Bohemian characters and their behaviour.behavior. But also, Manhattan - and specifically Alphabet City - was financially destitute at this point in time, historically. Artsy types were drawn there purely for the vibes even when they came from better backgrounds (Mark (Mark, for example example, is firmly middle class and still in contact with his parents, as is Joanne, whose parents seem to be political figures of some kind), but plenty of people were also living that way out of necessity. The block where the apartment is located is described as a "tent city" and is full of homeless and addicts and people dying from a poorly understood, worse-treated disease. Mark and Roger (per the title song) feel like they're witnessing the worst of humanity - their former Bohemian friend Benny trying to run out the homeless and the destitute that he used to live with - and their response is that paying rent is paying "The Man", and the man isn't doing anything for them, so why should they?
** Except that The Man (here personified by Benny) ''is'' doing something for them, by allowing them to live in a building rent-free (a luxury that many people on impossibly low income would die for). He later goes back on his eviction notice despite the protest going ahead, which suggests that it may have been an empty threat all along. He also ends up paying for both Angel's funeral and Mimi's rehab. This whole issue continues to be a point of contention between the show's fans and its detractors: some of the characters often go out of their way to ''avoid'' earning money honestly out of supposed principle or dedication to their art, but are still happy to let rich friends and family pay their way for them, or even re-wire ATM machines to steal from banks. The play even points out that both Mark and Maureen's championing of the homeless is also self-serving, and arguably not actually helping the homeless that much. Whether you sympathise sympathize with the main characters or not mostly ends up being a matter of personal perspective.
*** One important point is that Benny isn't asking them to START PAYING rent, he is after "last year's rent" - so charging retrospectively a large sum most wouldn't have up front - and had supposedly said they could live there without paying when he bought the place, having previously been their room mate.
roommate.



* Why is Mr Grey appalled enough to make note of Maureen slapping Joanne's ass (or in the film, Joanne groping Maureen's), when he didn't have issue with Maureen slapping her own ass (in the movie, Joanne slapping Maureen's) previously?
** I don't know, maybe homophobia?

to:

* Why is Mr Mr. Grey appalled enough to make note of Maureen slapping Joanne's ass (or in the film, Joanne groping Maureen's), Maureen's) when he didn't have an issue with Maureen slapping her own ass (in the movie, Joanne slapping Maureen's) previously?
** I don't know, maybe homophobia?homophobia?

* If Mark can't pay his rent and doesn't have a job, then how on earth does he afford film for his camera? Especially filming the way he does, with no set script or idea as to what he's even making, just recording endlessly? A 100-foot roll of 16mm film goes for anywhere between $25-40 dollars and that amounts to just under three minutes of screentime.
12th Jan '18 10:18:31 AM thekeyofe
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<<|ItJustBugsMe|>>




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** I always thought "that night" was the second part of Goodbye Love when Mark and Roger fight before Roger leaves for Santa Fe. "For once, the shadows gave way to light/For once, I didn't disengage..." meaning that they both let loose with things they had kept bottled up for months or years.
10th Oct '17 12:23:12 AM DoctorNemesis
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*** As for Mimi's mother in Voicemail 5, she could refer to her as 'Mimi' simply so that the audience knows who is being addressed and doesn't have to spend several moments confusedly wondering "Wait, who is this 'Alejandra' that woman is referring to? Has there been a character called 'Alejandra'? I'm puzzled."

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*** As for ** Mimi's mother in Voicemail 5, she 5 could refer to her as 'Mimi' simply so that the audience knows who is being addressed and doesn't have to spend several moments confusedly wondering "Wait, who is this 'Alejandra' that woman is referring to? Has there been a character called 'Alejandra'? I'm puzzled."
" If Mimi ''did'' change her name, then it's a slight artistic fudge in order to ensure a broader clarity. And if she didn't change her name... well, she's reckless and doesn't care about the future to begin with.




to:

** These ''are'' slightly pretentious boho arty types we're dealing with here.
9th Oct '17 11:42:09 PM DoctorNemesis
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to:

*** As for Mimi's mother in Voicemail 5, she could refer to her as 'Mimi' simply so that the audience knows who is being addressed and doesn't have to spend several moments confusedly wondering "Wait, who is this 'Alejandra' that woman is referring to? Has there been a character called 'Alejandra'? I'm puzzled."
27th Jun '17 1:38:46 AM DoctorNemesis
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** He might also be chafing a bit at Mimi having the nerve to lecture him on how he should live his life and cope with his feelings, given that her own house isn't exactly in order in this regard. After all, well-meant and on-point it may be, a nineteen-year-old heroin-addicted stripper with issues around recklessness (and, not that he at that point knows, also has HIV/AIDS as well) is perhaps not the best person to be acting as a life-coach offering unsolicited and unwanted advice on what people are doing wrong with their lives and how they should go about fixing them. Especially when that life-advice is essentially "Hey, you know what's gonna fix all your problems? Getting absolutely fucked up on heroin with me!"

to:

** He might also be chafing a bit at Mimi having the nerve to lecture him on how he should live his life and cope with his feelings, given that her own house isn't exactly in order in this regard. After all, well-meant and on-point it may be, a nineteen-year-old heroin-addicted stripper with issues around recklessness (and, not that he at that point knows, also has HIV/AIDS as well) is perhaps not the best person to be acting as a life-coach offering unsolicited and unwanted advice on what people are doing wrong with their lives and how they should go about fixing them. Especially when that life-advice is essentially "Hey, you know what's gonna fix all your problems? Getting absolutely fucked up on heroin with me!"
me!" After all, Roger himself notes that if Mimi really had the answers that she claims she does, she probably wouldn't be on heroin in the first place ("if you're so wise then tell me, why do you need smack?").
27th Jun '17 1:33:21 AM DoctorNemesis
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** He might also be chafing a bit at Mimi having the nerve to lecture him on how he should live his life and cope with his feelings, given that her own house isn't exactly in order in this regard. After all, well-meant and on-point it may be, a nineteen-year-old heroin-addicted stripper with issues around recklessness (and, not that he at that point knows, also has HIV/AIDS as well) is perhaps not the best person to be acting as a life-coach offering unsolicited and unwanted advice on what people are doing wrong with their lives and how they should go about fixing them.

to:

** He might also be chafing a bit at Mimi having the nerve to lecture him on how he should live his life and cope with his feelings, given that her own house isn't exactly in order in this regard. After all, well-meant and on-point it may be, a nineteen-year-old heroin-addicted stripper with issues around recklessness (and, not that he at that point knows, also has HIV/AIDS as well) is perhaps not the best person to be acting as a life-coach offering unsolicited and unwanted advice on what people are doing wrong with their lives and how they should go about fixing them. \n Especially when that life-advice is essentially "Hey, you know what's gonna fix all your problems? Getting absolutely fucked up on heroin with me!"
26th Jun '17 12:25:41 AM DoctorNemesis
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** He might also be chafing a bit at Mimi having the nerve to lecture him on how he should live his life and cope with his feelings, given that her own house isn't exactly in order in this regard. After all, well-meant and on-point it may be, a nineteen-year-old heroin-addicted stripper with HIV/AIDS and issues around recklessness is perhaps not the best person to be acting as a life-coach offering unsolicited and unwanted advice on what people are doing wrong with their lives and how they should go about fixing them.

to:

** He might also be chafing a bit at Mimi having the nerve to lecture him on how he should live his life and cope with his feelings, given that her own house isn't exactly in order in this regard. After all, well-meant and on-point it may be, a nineteen-year-old heroin-addicted stripper with HIV/AIDS and issues around recklessness (and, not that he at that point knows, also has HIV/AIDS as well) is perhaps not the best person to be acting as a life-coach offering unsolicited and unwanted advice on what people are doing wrong with their lives and how they should go about fixing them.
26th Jun '17 12:22:16 AM DoctorNemesis
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** He might also be chafing a bit at Mimi having the nerve to lecture him on how he should live his life and cope with his feelings, given that her own house isn't exactly in order in this regard. After all, well-meant it may be, a nineteen-year-old heroin-addicted stripper with HIV/AIDS and issues around recklessness is perhaps not the best person to be acting as a life-coach offering unsolicited and unwanted advice on what people are doing wrong with their lives and how they should go about fixing them.

to:

** He might also be chafing a bit at Mimi having the nerve to lecture him on how he should live his life and cope with his feelings, given that her own house isn't exactly in order in this regard. After all, well-meant and on-point it may be, a nineteen-year-old heroin-addicted stripper with HIV/AIDS and issues around recklessness is perhaps not the best person to be acting as a life-coach offering unsolicited and unwanted advice on what people are doing wrong with their lives and how they should go about fixing them.
26th Jun '17 12:21:13 AM DoctorNemesis
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** He might also be chafing a bit at Mimi having the presumption to lecture him on how he should live his life and cope with his feelings. After all, well-meant it may be, a nineteen-year-old heroin-addicted stripper with HIV/AIDS and issues around recklessness is perhaps not the best person to be offering unsolicited and unwanted life-improvement advice on what people are doing wrong with their lives and how they should go about fixing them.

to:

** He might also be chafing a bit at Mimi having the presumption nerve to lecture him on how he should live his life and cope with his feelings. feelings, given that her own house isn't exactly in order in this regard. After all, well-meant it may be, a nineteen-year-old heroin-addicted stripper with HIV/AIDS and issues around recklessness is perhaps not the best person to be acting as a life-coach offering unsolicited and unwanted life-improvement advice on what people are doing wrong with their lives and how they should go about fixing them.
26th Jun '17 12:19:18 AM DoctorNemesis
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** He might also be chafing a bit at Mimi having the presumption to lecture him on how he should live his life and cope with his feelings. After all, a nineteen-year-old heroin-addicted stripper with HIV/AIDS is perhaps not the best person to be offering unsolicited and unwanted life-improvement advice on what people are doing wrong with their lives and how they should go about fixing them.

to:

** He might also be chafing a bit at Mimi having the presumption to lecture him on how he should live his life and cope with his feelings. After all, well-meant it may be, a nineteen-year-old heroin-addicted stripper with HIV/AIDS and issues around recklessness is perhaps not the best person to be offering unsolicited and unwanted life-improvement advice on what people are doing wrong with their lives and how they should go about fixing them.
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