History Headscratchers / PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians

18th Apr '16 11:44:46 AM ztyran
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* What I don't get about Pan's death is the timeline of it. Thanks to the satyrs he's been on life support for ''two thousand years''!! What I want to know is '''''why''''' did the god of the wilds give up the ghost all those years ago when there was plenty of wild and man didn't looting it until ''after'' his supposed death?
2nd Apr '16 10:33:20 PM fbiuzz
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*** One must remember that this is not Christianity, where the deity is consider an omnipotent benevolent creator. The Greek Gods were considered personified forces of nature, this is why the gods tend to have seemingly bipolar personalities and be kind in one instant and become inhumanly cruel the next - they are not human beings. The Greeks did not worship them as role models or respect, but outright fear that they would blast them with lighting. Zeus is chaotic, temperamental and have hundreds of kids, because storms and lighting are randomly destructive, yet provide rain which fertilizes fields and growth. Poseidon is extremely temperamental, because the ocean can be calm in one second and destructive the next. Apollo, the sun god is said in mythology to shoot invisible arrows that randomly cause people to die, just in the same way that being in the sun too long can cause heatstroke. They are sentient aspects of nature seen through human veils.
26th Jan '16 12:11:58 PM Quanyails
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** If what Zeus said at the end of "The Blood of Olympus" is true then events did not have to end this way. Zeus says there are three fates so prophecies can unfold different ways. That is one reason they tend to be vague. I don't think Percy was mad at them because he realizes that they are not KarmaHoudinis. And there are several stories in Greek Mythology back this up. A fated event can be prevented if the appropriate action is taken. A son of Metis was destined to overthrow Zeus and Zeus prevented it. Troy could have avoided its fate of being destroyed if several things were done differently ,but they were not. At best, the Fates are keepers of balance. They prevent the gods from utterly enslaving mortals and that different sides have a fair shot at succeeding. The Fates do not control absolutely everything. To blame them is to devoid both the gods and mortals of any responsibility. Luke's fate could have been avoided if Hermes had been a better father, if Hades had not chosen to cure the oracle, if Luke' mother had not ignored Hermes's warnings, if this and that. Luke brought his fate upon himself. Percy knows this. So he does not blame them.

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** If what Zeus said at the end of "The Blood of Olympus" is true then events did not have to end this way. Zeus says there are three fates so prophecies can unfold different ways. That is one reason they tend to be vague. I don't think Percy was mad at them because he realizes that they are not KarmaHoudinis.{{Karma Houdini}}s. And there are several stories in Greek Mythology back this up. A fated event can be prevented if the appropriate action is taken. A son of Metis was destined to overthrow Zeus and Zeus prevented it. Troy could have avoided its fate of being destroyed if several things were done differently ,but they were not. At best, the Fates are keepers of balance. They prevent the gods from utterly enslaving mortals and that different sides have a fair shot at succeeding. The Fates do not control absolutely everything. To blame them is to devoid both the gods and mortals of any responsibility. Luke's fate could have been avoided if Hermes had been a better father, if Hades had not chosen to cure the oracle, if Luke' mother had not ignored Hermes's warnings, if this and that. Luke brought his fate upon himself. Percy knows this. So he does not blame them.
13th Jan '16 12:21:35 PM whisperstar13
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** Are you talking about ''Percy Jackson'' or ''The Heroes of Olympus'', or both? In the former of the two, Percy was only able to ride pegasi so well because he was sired by the one who created them, and presumably, a lot of the other people he goes questing with don't know how to ride horses and wouldn't be able to do so unless it was absolutely necessary. Not to mention, in one of the books, the quest involved them travelling into the Bermuda Triangle, and for the son of the sea god, the best way to travel there would be by sea, while another had them travelling through an underground maze, where pegasi wouldn't be useful; in the third book, Thalia was afraid of heights, making a cross-country flight impractical for her, the ''The Lightning Thief'' had Percy ''especially'' high on Zeus's hitlist throughout its duration, even moreso than usual, meaning even a pegasus may not have been safe for him. As for the sequel series, the trip from the Grand Canyon to Camp Half-Blood was done in a chariot, if I recall, and Annabeth did explain that Butch was one of the camp's best equestrians, and didn't he use some sort of faster-than-light travel to get them there? And for the rest of ''The Lost Hero'' and the four books that came after it...I haven't read them, but didn't they have Festus and the ''Argo II'' for those trips?

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** Are you talking I think it's all about ''Percy Jackson'' or ''The Heroes of Olympus'', or both? In how you handle the horses. Percy and Butch are both said to be really good with them, the former of the two, Percy was only able to ride pegasi so well because he was sired by the one who created them, and presumably, a lot of the other people he goes questing with don't know how to ride horses and wouldn't be able to do so unless it was absolutely necessary. Not to mention, in one of the books, the quest involved them travelling into the Bermuda Triangle, and for obvious reasons, being the son of the sea god, the best way Poseidon. Chances are horseback riding isn't a required lesson to travel there learn at camp, so using one ona quest would be by sea, while another out of the question for all but the most experienced campers. In book 3, the heroes had them travelling through an underground maze, where pegasi wouldn't be useful; in the third book, Thalia with them, and while the other quest members didn't know it, she was afraid of heights, making a cross-country flight trip on a winged horse impractical for her, her. And as for the ''The Lightning Thief'' had first book, Percy ''especially'' high was even higher on Zeus's hitlist throughout its duration, even moreso hit-list than usual, he normally was due to the theft of his bolt, meaning even a pegasus may pegasus, which are usually neutral territory, might not have been safe for him. As for the sequel series, the trip from the Grand Canyon him to Camp Half-Blood was done in a chariot, if I recall, and Annabeth did explain that Butch was one of the camp's best equestrians, and ride. (Not to mention, he didn't he use some sort of faster-than-light travel to get them there? And find out about his affinity for horses until the rest middle of ''The Lost Hero'' and his quest to retrieve the four books that came after it...I haven't read them, but didn't they have Festus and bolt, when he used the ''Argo II'' for those trips?connection to talk to a zebra in the back of a truck.)
12th Jan '16 9:11:18 PM whisperstar13
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** Are you talking about ''Percy Jackson'' or ''The Heroes of Olympus'', or both? In the former of the two, Percy was only able to ride pegasi so well because he was sired by the one who created them, and presumably, a lot of the other people he goes questing with don't know how to ride horses and wouldn't be able to do so unless it was absolutely necessary. Not to mention, in one of the books, the quest involved them travelling into the Bermuda Triangle, and for the son of the sea god, the best way to travel there would be by sea, while another had them travelling through an underground maze, where pegasi wouldn't be useful; in the third book, Thalia was afraid of heights, making a cross-country flight impractical for her, the ''The Lightning Thief'' had Percy ''especially'' high on Zeus's hitlist throughout its duration, even moreso than usual, meaning even a pegasus may not have been safe for him. As for the sequel series, the trip from the Grand Canyon to Camp Half-Blood was done in a chariot, if I recall, and Annabeth did explain that Butch was one of the camp's best equestrians, and didn't he use some sort of faster-than-light travel to get them there? And for the rest of ''The Lost Hero'' and the four books that came after it...I haven't read them, but didn't they have Festus and the ''Argo II'' for those trips?
11th Jan '16 11:58:03 PM HeWhoMustNotBeUsernamed
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*** Possibly confirmed. I remember Grover saying the war was fought "mostly" between those factions, implying that it wasn't entirely-A vs. entirely-B. And TheOtherWiki does claim that Stalin was a son of Hades (not cited, though). No idea about Mussolini or Hirohito, though.
























* It WAS his mother, and was referring to how she had to 'save' herself from Gabe. Or, it could have been how she was stuck in Hades. [[spoiler:when Percy goes there, he wasn't able to save her.]] (how do I add spoiler tags?) Either way, it was talking about how Percy wasn't the one that saved her.

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* ** It WAS his mother, and was referring to how she had to 'save' herself from Gabe. Or, it could have been how she was stuck in Hades. [[spoiler:when Percy goes there, he wasn't able to save her.]] (how do I add spoiler tags?) Either way, it was talking about how Percy wasn't the one that saved her.


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** And the logistics of all this? It would be one thing if the Revolutionary War was engineered by the gods Troy-style, but if Washington was really a son of Athena why wasn't he going on quests or getting attacked by monsters his whole life?


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* Is there a reason pegasi aren't used more often on quests? In ''Heroes of Olympus'' they get people from the Grand Canyon to Camp (on ''Long Island'', mind) between chapters. You'd think that would shave a whole bunch of time off of all those quests that take campers all the way to the West Coast in Books 1 and 3.
4th Jan '16 12:57:38 AM whisperstar13
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** You've also got a few things mixed around...Annabeth is the one who looks at Luke like an older sibling - she says as much when he asks her in the fifth book, that he was like a brother to her, but that she didn't love him ''that'' way. Annabeth constantly fretting over Luke's status as the villain was due to the sense of family that had existed between them in the past.
25th Dec '15 9:55:05 AM whisperstar13
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* Yes, I know the movie was bad, but I'd really like an actual explanation for this...What would be peoples' reaction to seeing a ten-headed stone statue of a Hydra sitting inside the Parthenon replica when it opens the next morning? Would they just assume it's some sort of ''extremely'' elaborate prank or...? (And by the way, if anyone knows this, does the Parthenon have security cameras?)

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* Yes, I know Is the movie doorman for the Empire State Building just a mortal that was bad, but I'd really like brought up to speed on the existence of the Greek gods, or he is an actual explanation for this...What would be peoples' reaction figure with a base in Greek lore and legends? I ask because, to seeing a ten-headed stone statue my recollection, I don't recall any of a Hydra sitting inside the Parthenon replica when it opens the next morning? Would they just assume it's some books ellaborating upon who he is, nor do I remember Olympus having any sort of ''extremely'' elaborate prank or...? (And by gatekeeper in the way, if anyone knows this, does the Parthenon have security cameras?)myths.
21st Dec '15 12:17:35 PM whisperstar13
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* Yes, I know the movie was bad, but I'd really like an actual explanation for this...What would be peoples' reaction to seeing a ten-headed stone statue of a Hydra sitting inside the Parthenon replica when it opens the next morning? Would they just assume it's some sort of ''extremely'' elaborate prank or...? (And by the way, if anyone knows this, does the Parthenon have security cameras?)
19th Dec '15 8:41:03 PM whisperstar13
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** Did the book clarify that Ariadne was dying at the time Dionysus made her immortal?. But even if he did, if he saw it coming, then he would've had time to make the change, or possibly, ask Zeus to make the change. Hades didn't have time to do this because Maria was killed suddenly, by a thunderbolt, that no one saw coming until it had already struck. That's why he couldn't do anything - once she's dead, she's moving on to the afterlife. Ariadne may have been ''close to death'', but she was still alive when Dionysus changed her. Her spirit hadn't left her body yet.
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