History Headscratchers / NorseMythology

16th Apr '16 3:07:58 AM Luppercus
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***Also donít believe everything you see in fiction, the idea that warriors who die of old age are rejected is not entirely true.
30th Jan '16 9:05:08 AM Sharlee
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** You have to take the myths with a grain of salt. Remember that most of this was written in the thirteen century, where most of northern Europe was being christianize, and most of the myths were originally oral. One version of the myths written by Sax Germanicus made a century earlier tells of how Baldar fought this guy name Hrodr over her foster sister, and Hrodr had to use a magic sword named Mistiltienn in order to kill Baldr, since being a god was just simply MadeofDiamonds. Personally I believed in this version since Baldr in Edda seems like Jesus with another name.

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** You have to take the myths with a grain of salt. Remember that most of this was written in the thirteen century, where most of northern Europe was being christianize, and most of the myths were originally oral. One version of the myths written by Sax Germanicus made a century earlier tells of how Baldar fought this guy name Hrodr over her foster sister, and Hrodr had to use a magic sword named Mistiltienn in order to kill Baldr, since being a god was just simply MadeofDiamonds. Personally I believed in this version since Baldr in Edda seems like Jesus with another name.name.

* Loki bargains with a dwarf, cheats, but still winds up owing the dwarf his head. The dwarf wants to decapitate him, but Loki successfully argues that his neck wasn't part of the deal. So why didn't the dwarf just remove ''most'' of Loki's head?
29th May '15 7:12:24 AM fbiuzz
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* Okay, so first Frigga makes everything and everyone promise not to harm Balder, and then Hel sets the condition that everyone cry for him before he can come back to life. The only thing that didn't promise was the mistletoe, and the only one who refused to cry was (disguised) Loki. So... does that mean even the likes of Jormungand and Fenrir agreed to this? Was he just ''that'' likable?

to:

* Okay, so first Frigga makes everything and everyone promise not to harm Balder, and then Hel sets the condition that everyone cry for him before he can come back to life. The only thing that didn't promise was the mistletoe, and the only one who refused to cry was (disguised) Loki. So... does that mean even the likes of Jormungand and Fenrir agreed to this? Was he just ''that'' likable?likable?
** You have to take the myths with a grain of salt. Remember that most of this was written in the thirteen century, where most of northern Europe was being christianize, and most of the myths were originally oral. One version of the myths written by Sax Germanicus made a century earlier tells of how Baldar fought this guy name Hrodr over her foster sister, and Hrodr had to use a magic sword named Mistiltienn in order to kill Baldr, since being a god was just simply MadeofDiamonds. Personally I believed in this version since Baldr in Edda seems like Jesus with another name.
18th May '15 5:27:06 PM Teakay
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** It wasn't so much that they wanted warriors that had died as they wanted particular warriors, and them dying was how they got them. Possibly they remain in whatever state they were when they died -- you want to grab Grapthar the Destroyer when he's still hale and hearty and capable of destroying. There's also the idea that dying in battle proves you're willing to give everything to the fight. Plus, in the myths, the valkyries would subtly arrange things to make the chosen warriors die -- so Grapthar might well have lived to the age of Cohen the Barbarian, but Odin needs him now, so that one arrow that would've grazed him is moved a liiiiiiittle to the left.

to:

** It wasn't so much that they wanted warriors that had died as they wanted particular warriors, and them dying was how they got them. Possibly they remain in whatever state they were when they died -- you want to grab Grapthar the Destroyer when he's still hale and hearty and capable of destroying. There's also the idea that dying in battle proves you're willing to give everything to the fight. Plus, in the myths, the valkyries would subtly arrange things to make the chosen warriors die -- so Grapthar might well have lived to the age of Cohen the Barbarian, but Odin needs him now, so that one arrow that would've grazed him is moved a liiiiiiittle to the left.left.
* Okay, so first Frigga makes everything and everyone promise not to harm Balder, and then Hel sets the condition that everyone cry for him before he can come back to life. The only thing that didn't promise was the mistletoe, and the only one who refused to cry was (disguised) Loki. So... does that mean even the likes of Jormungand and Fenrir agreed to this? Was he just ''that'' likable?
12th May '15 8:13:33 AM MrDeath
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* Why would the gods want humans who had ''died'' in battle to help them during Ragnarok? If someone dies in battle hasn't he, by definition, lost the fight? Wouldn't the best warriors be the ones who had survived to old age despite having been in many battles? But, as I understand it, those who die peacefully are rejected.

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* Why would the gods want humans who had ''died'' in battle to help them during Ragnarok? If someone dies in battle hasn't he, by definition, lost the fight? Wouldn't the best warriors be the ones who had survived to old age despite having been in many battles? But, as I understand it, those who die peacefully are rejected.rejected.
** It wasn't so much that they wanted warriors that had died as they wanted particular warriors, and them dying was how they got them. Possibly they remain in whatever state they were when they died -- you want to grab Grapthar the Destroyer when he's still hale and hearty and capable of destroying. There's also the idea that dying in battle proves you're willing to give everything to the fight. Plus, in the myths, the valkyries would subtly arrange things to make the chosen warriors die -- so Grapthar might well have lived to the age of Cohen the Barbarian, but Odin needs him now, so that one arrow that would've grazed him is moved a liiiiiiittle to the left.
11th May '15 5:36:26 PM UmbraFractus
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** While not an expert on Old Norse, I believe the letter eth (ð) is typically pronounced more like the 'th' in 'the' or 'father', and is occasionally translated as 'th' rather than 'd'. In addition, the name means 'dread biter', 'malice striker', or possibly 'striker in the dark'.

to:

** While not an expert on Old Norse, I believe the letter eth (ð) is typically pronounced more like the 'th' in 'the' or 'father', and is occasionally translated as 'th' rather than 'd'. In addition, the name means 'dread biter', 'malice striker', or possibly 'striker in the dark'.dark'.
* Why would the gods want humans who had ''died'' in battle to help them during Ragnarok? If someone dies in battle hasn't he, by definition, lost the fight? Wouldn't the best warriors be the ones who had survived to old age despite having been in many battles? But, as I understand it, those who die peacefully are rejected.
14th Mar '15 3:31:21 PM grimnir9
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* Pronounciations: Just as a matter of curiosity, I want to know how the names in the character page are supposed to be pronounced. For example, Níðhöggr is a really badass dragon, but it's name is anglicized to Nidhogg. It bugs me that his name is pronounced in english as "Nid-hog" and gives me a very FluffyTheTerrible vibe here. Presumably, the name sounds more badass in it's native language.

to:

* Pronounciations: Just as a matter of curiosity, I want to know how the names in the character page are supposed to be pronounced. For example, Níðhöggr is a really badass dragon, but it's name is anglicized to Nidhogg. It bugs me that his name is pronounced in english as "Nid-hog" and gives me a very FluffyTheTerrible vibe here. Presumably, the name sounds more badass in it's native language.language.
** While not an expert on Old Norse, I believe the letter eth (ð) is typically pronounced more like the 'th' in 'the' or 'father', and is occasionally translated as 'th' rather than 'd'. In addition, the name means 'dread biter', 'malice striker', or possibly 'striker in the dark'.
17th Jan '15 1:00:02 AM Jerkass
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* Pronounciations: Just as a matter of curiosity, I want to know how the names in the character page are supposed to be pronounced. For example, Níðhöggr is a really badass dragon, but it bugs me that his name is pronounced in english as "Nid-hog-ger", which gives me a very FluffyTheTerrible vibe here. Presumably, the name sounds more badass in it's native language.

to:

* Pronounciations: Just as a matter of curiosity, I want to know how the names in the character page are supposed to be pronounced. For example, Níðhöggr is a really badass dragon, but it it's name is anglicized to Nidhogg. It bugs me that his name is pronounced in english as "Nid-hog-ger", which "Nid-hog" and gives me a very FluffyTheTerrible vibe here. Presumably, the name sounds more badass in it's native language.
16th Jan '15 9:20:50 PM Jerkass
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*** One interpretation of this is that, yes, the world is going to end, but it already did and we're here afterwards, so life may continue even after ''this world'' ends.

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*** One interpretation of this is that, yes, the world is going to end, but it already did and we're here afterwards, so life may continue even after ''this world'' ends.ends.

* Pronounciations: Just as a matter of curiosity, I want to know how the names in the character page are supposed to be pronounced. For example, Níðhöggr is a really badass dragon, but it bugs me that his name is pronounced in english as "Nid-hog-ger", which gives me a very FluffyTheTerrible vibe here. Presumably, the name sounds more badass in it's native language.
23rd Jun '14 1:41:12 PM WaterBlap
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*** [[FridgeHorror And it is going to happen again...]]

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*** [[FridgeHorror And it is going to happen again...]]]]
*** One interpretation of this is that, yes, the world is going to end, but it already did and we're here afterwards, so life may continue even after ''this world'' ends.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Headscratchers.NorseMythology